Author Topic: Post your water report  (Read 136607 times)

Offline tshearer

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #435 on: June 19, 2019, 02:24:54 PM »
Would love any advice.  Just got my Ward Labs report.  This water is from the ‘Water Store’ downtown.  Is 7.2 pH too high?  Anything look out of range?   -Thx

7.2 pH
28 Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm
0.05 Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm
.3 / .3 Cations / Anions, me/L

6 Sodium, Na
< 1 Potassium, K
< 0 Calcium, Ca
< 1 Magnesium, Mg
< 1 Total Hardness, CaCO3
0.4 (SAFE) < 1 Nitrate, NO3-N
< 1 Sulfate, SO4-S
2 Chloride, Cl
< 1 Carbonate, CO3
15 Bicarbonate, HCO3
13 Total Alkalinity, CaCO3


Online Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #436 on: June 19, 2019, 02:47:30 PM »
Looks like typical RO. (Very close to the profile Bru'n Water assumes for RO.)  Happy brewing!
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline Virwill

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #437 on: June 25, 2019, 07:08:01 PM »
New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #438 on: June 25, 2019, 10:29:22 PM »
Would love any advice.  Just got my Ward Labs report.  This water is from the ‘Water Store’ downtown.  Is 7.2 pH too high?  Anything look out of range?   -Thx

7.2 pH
28 Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm
0.05 Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm
.3 / .3 Cations / Anions, me/L

6 Sodium, Na
< 1 Potassium, K
< 0 Calcium, Ca
< 1 Magnesium, Mg
< 1 Total Hardness, CaCO3
0.4 (SAFE) < 1 Nitrate, NO3-N
< 1 Sulfate, SO4-S
2 Chloride, Cl
< 1 Carbonate, CO3
15 Bicarbonate, HCO3
13 Total Alkalinity, CaCO3
pH of the water does not count for much, the malt will take that pH down in the mash. You want to add some Calcium for most beers.

A water spreadsheet will help you decide what to do for the beer you are brewing.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Megary

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #439 on: June 26, 2019, 12:51:32 AM »
From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #440 on: June 26, 2019, 01:16:39 AM »
From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes, gypsum. You can add some Epsom salt, but keep those Mg levels low.
Jeff Rankert
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AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Online Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #441 on: June 26, 2019, 01:21:31 AM »


From a 500’ well in NE PA. This is what I got back from Ward Labs:



So what’s the best way to add sulfate?  Gypsum?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Yes, gypsum. You can add some Epsom salt, but keep those Mg levels low.

Agree.  Malt itself provides all the magnesium that's really needed, and it can lend an unpleasant taste in any quantity.  Calcium is the magic dust of brewing anyway, so gypsum is the way to go.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Online Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #442 on: June 26, 2019, 01:35:46 AM »


New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

You'll definitely need to eliminate the chlorine, of course.   It would help if you knew whether your water plant used chlorine or chloramine.   A carbon block filter run at <1 gpm (gal/min) will eliminate chlorine, but you'll need to go up to10 times slower to eliminate chloramine, and a chlorine test kit to periodically confirm that the filter is still in good shape would be prudent.  Otherwise, Campden tablets or another form of potassium or sodium metabisulfite will eliminate either chlorine or chloramine instantaneously (1 tablet to ~20 gal) but be aware this will add small amounts of both sulfate and chloride, as well of course as sodium or potassium.  I would favor gypsum for adding calcium (you'll want at least 50 ppm) since you already have a fair amount of chloride.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Virwill

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #443 on: June 26, 2019, 10:46:16 AM »


New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

You'll definitely need to eliminate the chlorine, of course.   It would help if you knew whether your water plant used chlorine or chloramine.   A carbon block filter run at <1 gpm (gal/min) will eliminate chlorine, but you'll need to go up to10 times slower to eliminate chloramine, and a chlorine test kit to periodically confirm that the filter is still in good shape would be prudent.  Otherwise, Campden tablets or another form of potassium or sodium metabisulfite will eliminate either chlorine or chloramine instantaneously (1 tablet to ~20 gal) but be aware this will add small amounts of both sulfate and chloride, as well of course as sodium or potassium.  I would favor gypsum for adding calcium (you'll want at least 50 ppm) since you already have a fair amount of chloride.

Thanks, Robert. I've spoken w/the supervisor over there, and it's definitely chlorine. Still, running 6+ gallons of water through my countertop Brita is not my idea of time well spent. I understand that setting a large kettle-full out all night, or boiling same for X minutes, can also eliminate chlorine. Ever tried either one? Re gypsum - and forgive, please, but after almost 2 years back in the hobby and concentrating on sanitation, process and flavor, I've just discovered how much I do not know about water - is there a calculator or test for calcium so that I hit 50 ppm but don't go overboard? And re Campden tabs, I read where one treats 20 gallons. Best to use a pill splitter and just use a quarter or a third? Appreciate the help.

Online Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #444 on: June 26, 2019, 11:36:25 AM »


New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

You'll definitely need to eliminate the chlorine, of course.   It would help if you knew whether your water plant used chlorine or chloramine.   A carbon block filter run at <1 gpm (gal/min) will eliminate chlorine, but you'll need to go up to10 times slower to eliminate chloramine, and a chlorine test kit to periodically confirm that the filter is still in good shape would be prudent.  Otherwise, Campden tablets or another form of potassium or sodium metabisulfite will eliminate either chlorine or chloramine instantaneously (1 tablet to ~20 gal) but be aware this will add small amounts of both sulfate and chloride, as well of course as sodium or potassium.  I would favor gypsum for adding calcium (you'll want at least 50 ppm) since you already have a fair amount of chloride.

Thanks, Robert. I've spoken w/the supervisor over there, and it's definitely chlorine. Still, running 6+ gallons of water through my countertop Brita is not my idea of time well spent. I understand that setting a large kettle-full out all night, or boiling same for X minutes, can also eliminate chlorine. Ever tried either one? Re gypsum - and forgive, please, but after almost 2 years back in the hobby and concentrating on sanitation, process and flavor, I've just discovered how much I do not know about water - is there a calculator or test for calcium so that I hit 50 ppm but don't go overboard? And re Campden tabs, I read where one treats 20 gallons. Best to use a pill splitter and just use a quarter or a third? Appreciate the help.

I had always heard that letting it stand would gas off the chlorine.  Then last year one of us here on the forum did an experiment and found that heating does drive off the chlorine, but letting it stand uncovered doesn't:  https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=32589.msg419126#msg419126  Learn something every day!  Campden tabs is obviously the quickest way.  There are spreadsheets and calculators that can help with mineral profiles etc.  Bru'n Water is a comprehensive spreadsheet that, even if you don't use it, it's worth reading the Water Knowledge page -- everything you'll ever need to know about the subject.   The free Water Chemistry (Advanced) calculator at Brewer's Friend is also a great stand alone product, comprehensive as you want it to be and easy to use.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Virwill

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #445 on: June 27, 2019, 12:18:01 PM »


New Castle, DE - Municipal Services Commission
June 1, 2019
4 wells, 1 treatment facility, carbon-filtered

Avg. Fluoride reading: 0.80 ppm
Avg. Chlorine reading: 1.20 ppm
Avg. pH: 7.5 (annual range: 6.7-8.2)
Temperature range: 50º-60.8º
Alkalinity, annual range: 18.3-18.9 ppm
Most recent test for water hardness: 26.6 mg/liter, considered soft (less than 60 mg/l)
Calcium: 12.2-16.1 ppm
Chloride: 61.2-95.6 ppm
Chlorine: 0.54-2.08 ppm
Manganese: 0.0021-0.0021 ppm
Magnesium: Not tested for
Sodium: 22.9-25.5 ppm
Sulfate: 9.5-14.2
Zinc: 0.0278-0.0278

It's fairly tasteless water but there's something that my Brita filters out of our drinking water, so it's probably the chlorine. I've brewed only with spring and distilled water so far but I'm going to give this stuff a go in a test batch this summer. Thoughts, anyone?

You'll definitely need to eliminate the chlorine, of course.   It would help if you knew whether your water plant used chlorine or chloramine.   A carbon block filter run at <1 gpm (gal/min) will eliminate chlorine, but you'll need to go up to10 times slower to eliminate chloramine, and a chlorine test kit to periodically confirm that the filter is still in good shape would be prudent.  Otherwise, Campden tablets or another form of potassium or sodium metabisulfite will eliminate either chlorine or chloramine instantaneously (1 tablet to ~20 gal) but be aware this will add small amounts of both sulfate and chloride, as well of course as sodium or potassium.  I would favor gypsum for adding calcium (you'll want at least 50 ppm) since you already have a fair amount of chloride.

Thanks, Robert. I've spoken w/the supervisor over there, and it's definitely chlorine. Still, running 6+ gallons of water through my countertop Brita is not my idea of time well spent. I understand that setting a large kettle-full out all night, or boiling same for X minutes, can also eliminate chlorine. Ever tried either one? Re gypsum - and forgive, please, but after almost 2 years back in the hobby and concentrating on sanitation, process and flavor, I've just discovered how much I do not know about water - is there a calculator or test for calcium so that I hit 50 ppm but don't go overboard? And re Campden tabs, I read where one treats 20 gallons. Best to use a pill splitter and just use a quarter or a third? Appreciate the help.

I had always heard that letting it stand would gas off the chlorine.  Then last year one of us here on the forum did an experiment and found that heating does drive off the chlorine, but letting it stand uncovered doesn't:  https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=32589.msg419126#msg419126  Learn something every day!  Campden tabs is obviously the quickest way.  There are spreadsheets and calculators that can help with mineral profiles etc.  Bru'n Water is a comprehensive spreadsheet that, even if you don't use it, it's worth reading the Water Knowledge page -- everything you'll ever need to know about the subject.   The free Water Chemistry (Advanced) calculator at Brewer's Friend is also a great stand alone product, comprehensive as you want it to be and easy to use.

Thanks, Robert. I joined last year but missed that report. Going to try the heating method for sure. Will be interesting because and my avg. level detected (by the supplier) is 1.20 ppm and the max is 2.08, well beyond ≤0.20 ppm. Will play w/the Campden tabs as well - at least, a portion of one for 6ish gallons, but will also check the refs you supplied. Any other numbers in the report stand out? Looking forward to cutting $10-$15 out of my brew day costs!

Offline Richard

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #446 on: July 02, 2019, 11:47:25 PM »
Hetch Hetchy water from snowmelt in the Sierra Nevada mountains.

My municipal water report lists some pretty wide ranges for ions, and using the averages doesn't give anion/cation balance. I finally decided to get some water tested by Ward Labs. It looks almost like RO! Everything is at the very low end of the ranges. I knew the water is soft, but this is well below the numbers I have been using in Bru'nWater. They are so low they almost don't matter.

pH 8.3
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 46
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.08
Cations / Anions, me/L 0.6 / 0.5

ppm
Sodium, Na 7
Potassium, K < 1
Calcium, Ca 5.14
Magnesium, Mg < 1
Total Hardness, CaCO3 17
Nitrate, NO3-N < 0.1 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S 1
Chloride, Cl 4
Carbonate, CO3 < 1.0
Bicarbonate, HCO3 21
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 17
Total Phosphorus, P < 0.01
Total Iron, Fe 0.02
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 03:36:23 PM by Richard »
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline Lost Nutz Garage

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #447 on: July 06, 2019, 02:26:59 AM »
Garrettsville, OH     municipal water sourced from a well.    treated for Fe and Mn only

I'm building a house and have the opportunity and budget to install water treatment which will be needed to deal with the hardness.   Any suggestions for assuring I have decent brewing water too?

mg/l
hardness Ca+ Mg = 296
Ca 84.1
Mg 20.9
Na 11.6

Alkalinity total    213
Cl 13.2
SO4  89.6
TDS   405
pH 7.8

Ed
aka/ Lost Nutz Garage (& Brewery)

Online Robert

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #448 on: July 06, 2019, 03:17:45 AM »
Garrettsville, OH     municipal water sourced from a well.    treated for Fe and Mn only

I'm building a house and have the opportunity and budget to install water treatment which will be needed to deal with the hardness.   Any suggestions for assuring I have decent brewing water too?

mg/l
hardness Ca+ Mg = 296
Ca 84.1
Mg 20.9
Na 11.6

Alkalinity total    213
Cl 13.2
SO4  89.6
TDS   405
pH 7.8

The calcium is at a really nice level for brewing, and the sulfate and sodium aren't excessive by any means.  You really don't need any mineral additions.  You say iron and manganese aren't an issue.  I suppose you'll be running it through an ion exchange softener for utility water.  My inclination would be to simply bypass the softener and use the straight well water (maybe filtered for sediment etc.) for brewing, just using acid additions to neutralize alkalinity as needed for a given grain bill.  At that pH, your alkalinity is almost entirely easily handled bicarbonate.  You're a lucky man in my estimation.  (Maybe the water's part of the secret to those good Don Hermann's pickles there in Garrettsville.)

EDIT I take it you're indicating it's not chlorinated?  If it is, a carbon block filter would take care of that as well as sediment.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 03:29:11 AM by Robert »
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Post your water report
« Reply #449 on: July 06, 2019, 12:15:09 PM »
Garrettsville, OH     municipal water sourced from a well.    treated for Fe and Mn only

I'm building a house and have the opportunity and budget to install water treatment which will be needed to deal with the hardness.   Any suggestions for assuring I have decent brewing water too?

mg/l
hardness Ca+ Mg = 296
Ca 84.1
Mg 20.9
Na 11.6

Alkalinity total    213
Cl 13.2
SO4  89.6
TDS   405
pH 7.8

Not too bad.

Cheap and Easy buy a gallon of phosphoric acid to treat the alkalinity.

More expensive buy an RO system.

Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!