Author Topic: Using Lactose in RIS  (Read 866 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2014, 04:45:49 AM »
Like some, I wonder about pH astringency. Dark beers can be tricky, and if pH got too low from the dark malts (which is common), there could be an acrid, astringent dryness. With that FG the beer should be sweet, if anything.
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Offline kdziok

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2014, 08:18:34 AM »
You know after giving it another taste last night, I think it may be the oak that's giving it the "dry" perception! There was a lot of oakie, barrel char taste that I was getting up front which I think was overpowering the sweeter tastes of the malts. Looking back over my notes, I had soaked 1.5oz of med toast French Oak cubes in my bourbon which turned the bourbon jet black. I added everything to secondary when it was time to age and I am assuming that a lot of that char flavor came off the newly toasted cubes. This is only my second attempt at "oak aging"  a beer so I know I still have a ton more to learn with that art form!  I think for now I may take a gallon and and still experiment with a little lactose just to see what happens. Thanks again for all the suggestions!

Offline majorvices

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2014, 09:33:43 AM »
the oak tannins will definitely give the perception of being drier.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2014, 09:45:56 AM »
I agree.  Oak tannins can be really astringent lending a percievable dry sensation in the mouth. This may be causing your perception o "lack of sweetness". You can try taking a sample of the beer and dosing it with a couple drops of lactose at a time until you are satisfied, then scale up from that point.
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Online morticaixavier

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2014, 09:46:50 AM »
however, remember that with ageing a lot of those oak tannins will drop out of the beer. if you sweeten now it may be too sweet later.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2014, 10:40:52 AM »
1.5 oz of medium toast French oak is not too much.  But six months is longer than I've gone on oak.

I'd pull it from the chips and age it for another six months before making a decision.

1.030 is a pretty high finishing gravity, so I can't imagine adding any more sweetness.
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Using Lactose in RIS
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2014, 12:00:08 PM »
Since I didn't see a reply from the op on m y previous suggestion, let's just say he pulled a small final gravity sample using a refractometer instead of a hydrometer.  Using sean's calculator http://seanterrill.com/2012/01/06/refractometer-calculator/ that translates to a final gravity of 1.0012, which is decidedly dry.  I'm not saying he did use a refractometer, but if he did, I think this might explain it.
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