Author Topic: Fermentation Timing  (Read 1047 times)

Offline flbrewer

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Fermentation Timing
« on: April 15, 2014, 02:45:47 PM »
The more often I brew, the more frequently I've seen my fermentation ending in just over a week (too small of batch to test by hydro). Of course I'm just going on what it looks like, but I'm curious how many others have < 2 weeks primary fermentation regularly.

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2014, 02:47:10 PM »
Almost always, except cider.
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Offline Jeff M

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2014, 03:05:58 PM »
About 95% of my beers have a finished fermentation within 4-6 days.  I do a few things to help this along,  Aerate, Proper Pitch Rate, and proper fermentation temperatures.  the only things that take longer tend to be Bigger beers.
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S. cerevisiae

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2014, 03:12:40 PM »
I rarely have an ale fermentation that takes more than a week to reach final gravity. Fermentation is usually over in four days when I repitch.  Outside of monster gravity worts, long ale fermentations are usually an indication that one has under-pitched or is fermenting at a temperature that is slowing yeast metabolism to a crawl.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 03:14:17 PM by S. cerevisiae »

Offline kramerog

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2014, 03:36:57 PM »
Less than two weeks of fermentation is the norm for me.  Big beers and finicky yeasts are the major exceptions.

Offline euge

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2014, 03:38:23 PM »
Usually 3-4 days after signs of fermentation appear. I let it sit for longer- especially now that I'm fermenting cooler. Once the krausen starts to subside I often raise the temp to 68-70F for ales to finish the ferment.

After 2 weeks but usually three I'll rack the beer.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 03:54:45 PM »
my last brew was in my glass (if a bit flat still) 8 days after brew day. 1.041 dry stout.
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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2014, 04:51:44 PM »
A reasonable rule of thumb is 2°P/day of attenuation for ales, and 1°P/day for lagers. If you're seeing significantly less than that, then like SC said, you're likely under-pitching and/or fermenting too cool.

But without checking the gravity, I wouldn't assume anything.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2014, 05:59:39 PM »
A reasonable rule of thumb is 2°P/day of attenuation for ales, and 1°P/day for lagers. If you're seeing significantly less than that, then like SC said, you're likely under-pitching and/or fermenting too cool.

But without checking the gravity, I wouldn't assume anything.

+1
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Offline Steve L

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2014, 01:14:06 AM »
Usually 3-4 days after signs of fermentation appear. I let it sit for longer- especially now that I'm fermenting cooler. Once the krausen starts to subside I often raise the temp to 68-70F for ales to finish the ferment.

After 2 weeks but usually three I'll rack the beer.
+1. I like to ferment my ales in the 67-68 range. Depending on the OG, My primary usually has a 12-24 hour lag and is winding down after 3-5 days. once my primary is almost finished, I raise the temp to around 72 and go another week or two so the yeast can clean up after themselves. I'm not often in a hurry so I do a minimum of 2 weeks, though 3 is better for me :D
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 01:18:34 AM by swlusk »
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rabeb25

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2014, 03:04:48 PM »
I have been working with(and having good luck) a somewhat accelerated fermentation time schedule.

It looks like this:
chill to 60-63 aerate/pitch yeast
 Day 1   64.5   
 Day 2   65   
 Day 2.5   66   
 Day 3   67   
 Day 3.5   68   
 Day 4   68   
 Day 4.5   68   
 Day 5   68   
 Day 5.5   65   
 Day 5.75   60   
 Day 6   55   
 Day 6.25   50   
 Day 6.5   45   
 Day 6.75   40   
 Day 7   33   
 Day 8   keg/fine/carbonate

I built a fermentation controller to do this, I load a "profile" and it runs the program. It has 2 probes, one in the center of the wort (Beer), and one in the chamber(fridge). It will then heat/cool to keep the temps to the .1 of a degree( and does a fine job of that). If you look at the logging you will see at the height of fermentation at least 10f of difference.  This is on just a 1.040 cream ale with 1056. I then have a camera on the airlock to give me an idea of fermentation, but the controller is really good at telling me. If you look you will see the lag time in the beginning ( no heating or cooling going on) it will then start kicking on much less frequently. When I see little to no airlock movement, and the cycling slow down, I will then pull a sample for a gravity reading. Seems to work pretty much like clockwork.

If you want to see what I am talking about go to http://taplist.noip.me (that is my digital tap list) if you click on the top right corner (whats fermenting) it will take you to the controller. I am currently in day 5 of the schedule. The camera is here: http://brewcam.noip.me

Cheers,

Bryan

Offline euge

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2014, 03:25:04 PM »
Awesome!
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2014, 11:25:18 AM »
That is controlled fermentation Dude!  Well done and I am so jealous.  I wouldn't begin to know how to do that set up...you are very talented.  Goodonya!!!
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rabeb25

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Re: Fermentation Timing
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2014, 02:31:17 PM »
Thanks guys!

Just wanted to add, as of last evening FG was hit (1.008), sample tasted great. now the decline begins.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 02:42:41 PM by rabeb25 »