Author Topic: quasi CAP recipe help  (Read 397 times)

Offline goschman

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quasi CAP recipe help
« on: April 24, 2014, 03:03:35 PM »
In continuation of my post regarding possible 'non-standard' CAP ingredients I thought I better check to see if I am even on the right track with my recipe.

75% pilsner
20% flaked corn
5% carapils/light crystal

Mash at 148 for 75 min

14 g Magnum 60 min
21 g Willamette 20 min
21 g Willamette 0 min

OG 1.053
IBU ~32
SRM 4

Yeast TBD. WY2112 or WY2007? Ferment around 60F.

So I know this is not a traditional intrepretation but my goal is mainly to get close and make something classic american pilsneresque. Other than things addressed prior, is there an issue with using magnum for bittering?

Any input? Again...my goal is not necessarily to make an authentic CAP but something resembling it. I wouldn't know the difference anyway...haha
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 03:15:44 PM by goschman »

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2014, 03:23:45 PM »
Well my light colored lagerish house recipe is 80% GW Pils and 20% Vienna, and 14 g magnum at 60. Seems to be a hit with the coors light folk. You're in the right neighborhood I think. I'm not a fan of corn personally, but to each his own. I just don't think pils is an overpowering flavor. Plus yours is going to be covered by Willamettiness anyway.

Offline goschman

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2014, 03:29:10 PM »
My light colored beers seem to come out better than anything else for some reason. Maybe water? My Kolsch, blonde, and wheat are my best beers. This will be my first attempt at something 'lagerish' but I might just go with US05 if it is too much trouble or if I can't do it properly.

I honestly don't think I have ever used any type of corn. I thought it was a traditional ingredient. I contemplated splitting it with flaked rice so it isn't too much.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 03:32:38 PM by goschman »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2014, 03:46:37 PM »
Here is by far(  IMO) the best CAP recipe out there. The corn is appropriate for the style and gives a little pleasant sweetness. Using 6 -row is traditional and gives extra diastatic power to convert the flaked maize. Using Cluster hops was common for bittering, but in a pinch I'm sure Magnum would be fine. Regardless of the yeast you choose ( though WLP833 is great), I say   1/  go cool as you can manage, 2/  use the flaked maize, and 3/ use some 6 -row. Here you go:

http://brewery.org/brewery/cm3/recs/02_41.html
Jon H.

Offline goschman

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2014, 03:53:09 PM »
Thanks! Looks like I should back off on my late hop additions and rely mainly on the bittering addition. The step mash will prove difficult in my igloo cooler but it looks like I have all the information needed.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2014, 04:03:50 PM »
Actually, current BJCP guidelines give CAP 25-40 IBUs, so you don't necessarily need to scale back your hop additions at all. I usually go toward the upper end. I mostly posted the recipe to give you an idea of typical ingredients.
Jon H.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2014, 07:24:24 PM »
I learned from denny to ask why for each ingredient. Because, or its what the rules say, is not good enough for me. Corn does two things, bumps perceived sweetness (maybe) and reduces malt flavor. With american pils there isn't that much maltiness, and if you're hopping beyond an ounce, it will cover that little bit of maltiness. But I dont make money by talking people out of using corn, I'm just sayin...

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2014, 07:34:35 PM »
Actually, current BJCP guidelines give CAP 25-40 IBUs, so you don't necessarily need to scale back your hop additions at all. I usually go toward the upper end. I mostly posted the recipe to give you an idea of typical ingredients.

I'm curious to see if CAP changes in the new guidelines. Seems like "classic" should not evolve over time. The problem is that most people alive today have not actually tasted one, other than a homebrewed version. Almost like its becoming a mythical beer like some ancient Egyptian recipe written in cuneiform

Offline wingnut

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Re: quasi CAP recipe help
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2014, 05:05:49 AM »
From the ask 7 brewers, get 7 different answers department....   ;) 

I basically agree with Jim... it can both enhance the flavors of the malt, and take them away!

Corn does two things, bumps perceived sweetness (maybe) and reduces malt flavor

In my experience, corn provides a subtle flavor, one that I think I can taste if you tell me corn is used, but I don't pick it out on it's own.  I do not think corn adds the flavor of  sweetness per se, but... to me, it does round out the flavor profile in my opinion.  (I actually think it dries the beer out and helps the more subtle flavors of the malt "pop".  In other words, I think it helps un-muddle the malt flavors from the residual sugars, letting the characteristics of the different malts... like Vienna and Pils, be more distinctive )   However, too much corn and the body of the beer gets thinner, and the flavors go "flat" again... so it is a balancing act...

I have substituted corn/rice/dextrose and table sugar in my "lagerish ales" (like cream ale and sometimes ale yeast fermented American Pils) and I find I can use Corn, rice and sugars interchangeably.   A more experienced taster may be able to pick out corn...but I cannot.

Bottom line, I think you have a great base recipe for a CAP, and one that is simple enough, that you can play with different ingredients each time you brew it, and you can see what each ingredient does for YOU.

Enjoy!   
-- Wingnut - Cheers!