Author Topic: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?  (Read 1733 times)

Offline neilrobinson

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Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« on: April 08, 2010, 12:50:24 AM »
     I have recently brewed my first all-grain batch of beer. It was a basic hoppy APA. All the readings hit within the target range for the beer style. The first gravity reading was a little in the heavy side for the beer style but within limits. The alcohol content was high though at about 7% BV. Now when it came time to bottle the beer, I did everything like I usually do when I bottle beer made with extract. I used the same amount of priming sugar and took all the same precautions as usual. However, two weeks later my beer seems to still be flat. Should there be any difference in all-grain beer and extract beer when bottling? I have researched extensively brewing all-grain vs extract, but not the bottling aspect. Should I just give it more time? Would adding more priming sugars help? Does the high alcohol content have anything to do with it? ( This is the highest content I have had.) Any suggestion about boosting the carbonation when bottling would be good.

Thank you

Offline tygo

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 03:45:23 AM »
There aren't any differences between bottling extract and bottling all-grain.  What yeast did you use?  What were the original and final gravities?  How long was the beer in the fermenter?
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Offline denny

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 08:36:27 AM »
I think you just need to be patient. 
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Offline dhacker

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2010, 10:45:27 AM »
Neil . . I assume you're talking about the "Leaky Kettle" APA. I opened the 1st of the sixer you gave me this past weekend. It had moderate carbonation but seemed just ever so slightly sweet. I figured the carbonating sugar just hadn't been eaten up fully. After I saw your post, I popped the top on another bottle. I slowly poured it into my hydrometer sample tube so I could take a reading. Surprisingly, it took awhile because there was significant carbonation. Finally got it to settle enough to drop the hydrometer in and then shook it up to knock out the carbonation. Let it stand for about two hours and most of the bubbles finally stopped rising. I got a reading of 1.006 which means it would have started about 1.060 to get a 7% ABV. The beer needs a little aging, but in my opinion is pretty well balanced now and the last bottle was nicely carbed. I might mention they've been stored at room temperature since you gave them to me.

    
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 03:46:13 PM by dhacker »
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Offline euge

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2010, 10:50:45 AM »
Well there you go!

Hopefully the sugar was well mixed in the beer before bottling. That could leave you with some duds and some heavy carbers or even some bombs.

Sounds like it'll be ok... Time to start drinking them to see... one at a time LOL. :D
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Offline micsager

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2010, 02:20:29 PM »
Well there you go!

Hopefully the sugar was well mixed in the beer before bottling. That could leave you with some duds and some heavy carbers or even some bombs.

Sounds like it'll be ok... Time to start drinking them to see... one at a time LOL. :D

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Offline neilrobinson

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2010, 01:37:23 AM »
Neil . . I assume you're talking about the "Leaky Kettle" APA. I opened the 1st of the sixer you gave me this past weekend. It had moderate carbonation but seemed just ever so slightly sweet. I figured the carbonating sugar just hadn't been eaten up fully. After I saw your post, I popped the top on another bottle. I slowly poured it into my hydrometer sample tube so I could take a reading. Surprisingly, it took awhile because there was significant carbonation. Finally got it to settle enough to drop the hydrometer in and then shook it up to knock out the carbonation. Let it stand for about two hours and most of the bubbles finally stopped rising. I got a reading of 1.006 which means it would have started about 1.060 to get a 7% ABV. The beer needs a little aging, but in my opinion is pretty well balanced now and the last bottle was nicely carbed. I might mention they've been stored at room temperature since you gave them to me.

    

That was what my readings were. I guess I will have to pop a few more tops. (You know for research purposes.) You are the only one who got a six pack so I have plenty to sample.

I used Wyeast 1764  Pacman yeast from Rogue. It worked nice on my last beer. Had a few foamers in the last batch I used that yeast so I was confident in the yeast building up carbonation. As far as my notes go, I can not see where I did anything different than usual when bottling. I guess in retrospect, it could have been that I did not mix the priming sugar adequately. I did not think there was a difference in the bottling of all-grain versus extract, but I did not want to rule it out as an option. Trying to be thorough in my research. Thank you, everyone.   

Offline dhacker

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2010, 04:34:52 AM »
As a matter of curiosity, what temp did you target in your mash, and how long did you rest it there?
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Offline neilrobinson

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2010, 09:14:06 AM »
It was around 220 degrees, just above boiling and held it for 90 min.

Offline hokerer

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2010, 09:20:17 AM »
It was around 220 degrees, just above boiling and held it for 90 min.

He was asking about your mash temp and time, not boil
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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2010, 09:23:31 AM »
Although if your thermometer is reading 220 degrees at boil, it's at least 8°F high (unless you boil under pressure). Which means you were most likely mashing in the 140s. Doesn't have anything to do with bottle conditioning, but it certainly explains the 90% AA.
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Offline euge

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2010, 10:19:55 AM »
Does a heavy sugar solution only boil at 212F? I've always assumed it affected the boiling point since I've had reads as high as 220 with an accurate thermometer.
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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2010, 12:41:56 PM »
Does a heavy sugar solution only boil at 212F? I've always assumed it affected the boiling point since I've had reads as high as 220 with an accurate thermometer.

Your thermometer must not be too accurate. At wort gravities the boiling point elevation is a couple degrees at most. To get to 220°F you'd need a 65% sucrose solution, apparently: http://chestofbooks.com/food/science/Experimental-Cookery/The-Boiling-Point-Of-Water-And-Solutions.html
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Offline dhacker

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2010, 02:23:09 PM »
Although if your thermometer is reading 220 degrees at boil, it's at least 8°F high (unless you boil under pressure). Which means you were most likely mashing in the 140s. Doesn't have anything to do with bottle conditioning, but it certainly explains the 90% AA.

Interesting thoughts here. I will say the beer certainly did not give the dry as a chip character one might have expected from a mash in the 140s.
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Offline denny

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Re: Bottling All-grain vs Extract?
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2010, 08:29:56 AM »
Does a heavy sugar solution only boil at 212F? I've always assumed it affected the boiling point since I've had reads as high as 220 with an accurate thermometer.

I'm only a few hundred feet above sea level and the highest I think I've ever seen mine is 220.  BTW, this kinda goes with the discussion of caramelization in another thread.  You need temps above 360 for caramelization and you can't get those in your kettle.
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