General Category > Ingredients

Domestic vs Continental Pilsner Malt

(1/4) > >>

ncbluesman:
I bought a bag of Rahr Premium Pilsner. Has anyone compared this with continental Pilsner malts? I recognize that if I make a Bo-Pils, it won't be authentic, but how would it differ from one?

The price difference was compelling.

brewinhard:
I find continental pilsner malt (ie Bestmalz which I usually use for german styles or Dingemanns for Belgians) to have a bit fuller body than our North American pilsner malt.  They seem to have a touch more sweetness and roundness to them.  I have also noticed that especially when using the Rahr that the beers tend to dry out more from attenuation than when using the Continental versions in the same recipe using the same mash temps and specs.  YMMV...

morticaixavier:
It's a subtle thing. perhaps too subtle for me. I mostly use domestic ingredients out of a desire to minimize the distance travelled by my beer and mostly it's not even noted in competition. in fact one of the beers that made it through to the second round was an amber lager brewed with domestic ingredients. I entered the same beer in another contest and a grand master 4 judge was on that panel. he picked it out. The first time anyone has.

beersk:
I think there is a difference, but it's quite subtle. There's a certain sumpin' sumpin' that German pils malt has over domestic pils. I prefer to use authentic ingredients for my brewing, but I don't know if it'd matter much in something like a schwarzbier. I do typically use Rahr white wheat for my hefes though...so I wonder much different it'd be with something like Weyermann or Best. Guess I'll find out since I've got a sack of Best wheat comin'. My guess is it won't be much different as hefes are mainly driven by the yeast.

reverseapachemaster:

--- Quote from: beersk on May 09, 2014, 08:41:25 AM ---I think there is a difference, but it's quite subtle. There's a certain sumpin' sumpin' that German pils malt has over domestic pils.
--- End quote ---

Definitely a difference. I think the Belgian/French pils is most different from domestic sources but German pils is subtly different but in a way that really seems to matter. I find the Belgian and French pils is more crackery than domestic and German is similar in overall taste to domestic but more complex.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version