Author Topic: Starter for Tomorrow?  (Read 766 times)

Offline lazydog79

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Starter for Tomorrow?
« on: May 09, 2014, 09:59:45 PM »
This is a new one for me.  I kind of screwed up before I even started brewing  >:(  I'm planning on brewing a five gallon batch of ESB tomorrow.  The planned OG is 1.059.  Mrmalty tell me I need about a liter and a half starter (205 billion).  I usually like to get my starters going at least 48 hours prior so they finish out before crashing, decanting and pitching.  Unfortunately, I got busy and forgot to get yeast earlier this week.  I'm thinking 24 hours isn't long enough for a starter.  Should I pony up and get two vials and forgo the starter or would I get enough out of a 24 hour starter?

Oh, forgot to mention the yeast.  I was planning on using White Labs 002: English Ale.  I have a satchet of Dantstar Windsor in the fridge that was to go for a later brew.  Thinking I might just go with that.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2014, 10:07:15 PM by lazydog79 »

Offline Stevie

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Re: Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2014, 10:44:20 PM »
I would make a 1 liter starter and pitch without decanting. If you have the Windsor as a backup, that might be the best option

Offline a10t2

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Re: Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2014, 11:44:27 PM »
I'd just wait to pitch Sunday or Monday, rather than rush the starter. The potential problem is that the starter may show that the yeast isn't viable, but you have a backup in the Windsor.
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S. cerevisiae

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Re: Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2014, 12:30:58 AM »
The number of cells in a yeast culture doubles roughly every ninety minutes after the lag phase is complete.  Even if the tube only contains 35 billion viable cells, the culture should not take more than 12 hours to reach 205 billion cells. 

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2014, 10:48:07 PM »

The number of cells in a yeast culture doubles roughly every ninety minutes after the lag phase is complete.  Even if the tube only contains 35 billion viable cells, the culture should not take more than 12 hours to reach 205 billion cells.

Do you have an opinion on which yeast starter growth model is correct Chris White's versus Kaiser's? They give different results.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2014, 02:51:12 PM »
I am sorry for not getting back to you sooner.  When in doubt, always go with Chris White's data.  Chris has been propagating yeast professionally for a long time; therefore, he and his team have had lot of time to collect growth data.   

Offline tommymorris

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Starter for Tomorrow?
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2014, 10:52:01 PM »
I am sorry for not getting back to you sooner.  When in doubt, always go with Chris White's data.  Chris has been propagating yeast professionally for a long time; therefore, he and his team have had lot of time to collect growth data.


According to the time stamp on these posts you got back to me in less than 24 hours. I can't get some people who work for to give me that kind of response time.

By the way, thanks! I never even thought to connect Chris White to White Labs. You make a great point.