Author Topic: dry hoping process  (Read 1190 times)

Offline hulkavitch

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dry hoping process
« on: May 13, 2014, 08:41:04 AM »
I have a ten gallon batch right now in two fermenters and I dont have enough secondary vessels to transfer both to secondary. Can you dry hop in primary or is that ill advised?

Offline yso191

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2014, 08:55:27 AM »
I never use a secondary, so I always dry hop in the primary.  I wait until primary fermentation is done and drop them in.

It does help a bit if you can remove the yeast before dry hopping (like in a conical fermenter), but the yeast will only absorb a small amount of hoppy goodness - just compensate by adding more!

*note* absorb is probably the wrong term, but you get it.
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Offline bbesser

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2014, 09:26:52 AM »
I am lazy, and like yso, do not bother with transferring to a secondary.  I let primary finish, give it a couple days, then throw the dry hops in with a mesh bag.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2014, 09:37:22 AM »
If you are kegging the beer you can dry hop in the keg. However, if you are bottling I recommend dry hopping near the end of the primary fermentation in the primary vessel.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2014, 09:41:30 AM »
If you are kegging the beer you can dry hop in the keg.

+1.  I dry hop in a purged keg.  Away from the yeast and in a purged environment - win-win.
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Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2014, 09:43:15 AM »
I never use a secondary, so I always dry hop in the primary.  I wait until primary fermentation is done and drop them in.

It does help a bit if you can remove the yeast before dry hopping (like in a conical fermenter), but the yeast will only absorb a small amount of hoppy goodness - just compensate by adding more!

*note* absorb is probably the wrong term, but you get it.

I've found that the issue is not so much that it "absorbs" it as that it changes the hop character.
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Offline hulkavitch

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2014, 09:53:40 AM »
so it changes the character of the aroma?  My keg is still full so that is a no go...Wouldn't prolonged time in the keg produce grassy character to the beer.?

Offline bbesser

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2014, 09:58:18 AM »
If you are kegging the beer you can dry hop in the keg.

+1.  I dry hop in a purged keg.  Away from the yeast and in a purged environment - win-win.

When you guys dry hop in the keg, are you using the keg as a secondary and not dispensing from that keg?  Or do you dry hop in a bag in the keg, remove the bag, then carb and serve?
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Offline dkfick

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2014, 10:04:46 AM »
I typically dry hop in the keg for 3-4 days and then pull my hops out out... There is often a little hop residue in teh bottom but it typically comes out after the first few pints.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2014, 10:10:11 AM »
If you are kegging the beer you can dry hop in the keg.

+1.  I dry hop in a purged keg.  Away from the yeast and in a purged environment - win-win.

  Or do you dry hop in a bag in the keg, remove the bag, then carb and serve?

I usually dry hop in a fine mesh bag, leave it in, carb and serve. Sometimes I use Blatz' trick and tie teflon tape around the bag and pull it, then carb and serve.  Seals better than fishing line.
Jon H.

Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2014, 11:20:03 AM »
so it changes the character of the aroma?  My keg is still full so that is a no go...Wouldn't prolonged time in the keg produce grassy character to the beer.?

Not in my experience, or that of many others.  I leave the dry hops in the serving keg for 2-3 months and they don't get grassy.

In the primary, hops and yeast can interact and give you kind of a rose scent.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2014, 06:19:35 PM »
I never use a secondary, so I always dry hop in the primary.  I wait until primary fermentation is done and drop them in.

It does help a bit if you can remove the yeast before dry hopping (like in a conical fermenter), but the yeast will only absorb a small amount of hoppy goodness - just compensate by adding more!

*note* absorb is probably the wrong term, but you get it.

I've found that the issue is not so much that it "absorbs" it as that it changes the hop character.

Well, my experience is a bit different. Possibly because I can taste the beer via a zwickle during different phases. In my experience a beer with yeast in suspension can taste fantatastic after dry hopped but as the beer drops clean and brightens the hop aroma is stripped.

I recommend dropping as much yeast as possible before dry hopping. You don't have to get it sparkly clear, but a yeast haze can be a problem if you dry hop too early. I'm not convinced that it has to be done in a secondary.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2014, 06:22:58 PM by majorvices »
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Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2014, 06:40:49 PM »
Well, my experience is a bit different. Possibly because I can taste the beer via a zwickle during different phases. In my experience a beer with yeast in suspension can taste fantatastic after dry hopped but as the beer drops clean and brightens the hop aroma is stripped.

I recommend dropping as much yeast as possible before dry hopping. You don't have to get it sparkly clear, but a yeast haze can be a problem if you dry hop too early. I'm not convinced that it has to be done in a secondary.

Yeah, that makes sense.
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Offline hulkavitch

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2014, 07:20:49 AM »
would you recommend cold crashing, then dry hoping (in order to clarify the beer)? Also, what is the typical duration to leave the hops in? I have read anywhere from 3-4 days, up to a week. Thx

Offline denny

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Re: dry hoping process
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2014, 07:53:19 AM »
would you recommend cold crashing, then dry hoping (in order to clarify the beer)? Also, what is the typical duration to leave the hops in? I have read anywhere from 3-4 days, up to a week. Thx

Yeah, that sounds good to me.  I typically dry hop for 1-2 weeks in a fermenter, months in a keg.
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