Author Topic: maris otter in stout  (Read 1153 times)

Offline hospter81

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maris otter in stout
« on: May 21, 2014, 03:49:39 PM »
Hi! i am planning to do a stout (OG 1080) with this malt bill soon:

80% maris otter
11% rye malt
3% cararye
3% midnight wheat
3% roasted barley

I have done this recipe before using 2h as base malt, mashing at 146ºF for 60 minutes and step it at 161ºF for 20 minutes for a very fermentable wort. This is the first time using MO, i have readed that MO is very good only for single infusion. steping at 146-161 will only carry me problems at lautern creating a very sticky grist? a 154ºF single infusion for 60 minutes would be better? can MO will convert the other grains in the grist? someone told me it has very low diastatic power...

thanks for your advises guys :)

Offline brewinhard

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2014, 04:02:01 PM »
Most base malt nowadays is fully modified and can be brewed with single infusion mashes including Maris otter.  step mashes can be used if you are looking to increase fermentabilty or enhance clarity of your wort.  Maris otter has enough diastatic power to convert all of your other grains in your bill.  Depending on how dry you want your beer to be you can mash that Maris otter at your desired temps with no ill effects (even at 146F).

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2014, 07:13:05 AM »
I've used Maris Otter in almost every mash schedule out there and never gotten stuck.

That seems like a really low amount of roasted barley for a stout.
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Offline hospter81

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2014, 08:01:20 AM »
I've used Maris Otter in almost every mash schedule out there and never gotten stuck.

That seems like a really low amount of roasted barley for a stout.

Yes :) im planning to add a shot of coffee at secondary

Offline blatz

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2014, 08:52:23 AM »
I've used Maris Otter in almost every mash schedule out there and never gotten stuck.

That seems like a really low amount of roasted barley for a stout.

Yes :) im planning to add a shot of coffee at secondary

even so, that looks way too low for a stout, especially one at 1.080.  I use ~ 16% dark roasted grains at 1.070.  YMMV
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Offline majorvices

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2014, 05:50:06 PM »
I've used Maris Otter in almost every mash schedule out there and never gotten stuck.

That seems like a really low amount of roasted barley for a stout.

Yes :) im planning to add a shot of coffee at secondary

even so, that looks way too low for a stout, especially one at 1.080.  I use ~ 16% dark roasted grains at 1.070.  YMMV

Agree. The Maris Otter is fine. Perhaps preferred. But you have no where near the roasted barley you need to brew a stout. Even with coffee or espresso.

And when adding the coffee or espresso, consider adding whole crushed beans to a secondary, or doing a combination of strong coffee and "dry bean".
« Last Edit: May 29, 2014, 05:53:21 PM by majorvices »
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Offline Don Deckert

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2014, 08:28:37 AM »
And when adding the coffee or espresso, consider adding whole crushed beans to a secondary, or doing a combination of strong coffee and "dry bean".



Can you elaborate on what you mean by "whole crushed beans" I'm as much a coffee snob as I am a beer snob, and "whole" and "crushed" have never been in the same sentence that I'm aware of.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2014, 07:04:11 PM »
And when adding the coffee or espresso, consider adding whole crushed beans to a secondary, or doing a combination of strong coffee and "dry bean".



Can you elaborate on what you mean by "whole crushed beans" I'm as much a coffee snob as I am a beer snob, and "whole" and "crushed" have never been in the same sentence that I'm aware of.

Course, Fresh ground. Sorry for the err in semantics.
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Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2014, 06:10:51 AM »
I've used Maris Otter in almost every mash schedule out there and never gotten stuck.

That seems like a really low amount of roasted barley for a stout.
To give another experience point, I had one bag of Crisp MO that stuck every time, even for single infusion ordinary bitter will a low amount of grist in the mash ton. I thought it was my process until I got a new bag. A very accomplished pro said that he finds that MO can be sticky.
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2014, 09:37:02 AM »
And when adding the coffee or espresso, consider adding whole crushed beans to a secondary, or doing a combination of strong coffee and "dry bean".



Can you elaborate on what you mean by "whole crushed beans" I'm as much a coffee snob as I am a beer snob, and "whole" and "crushed" have never been in the same sentence that I'm aware of.

Course, Fresh ground. Sorry for the err in semantics.

When I hear about it at Homebrew Club or otherwise, it is usually taking whole bean coffee, and just lightly crushing it into big pieces, rather than grinding it like you would for coffee. makes it easier to filter out, and the alcohol seems to do fine with the very coarse crush.
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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2014, 09:40:35 AM »
When I hear about it at Homebrew Club or otherwise, it is usually taking whole bean coffee, and just lightly crushing it into big pieces, rather than grinding it like you would for coffee. makes it easier to filter out, and the alcohol seems to do fine with the very coarse crush.

Yeah, that's the way I do it.
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2014, 09:43:10 AM »
When I hear about it at Homebrew Club or otherwise, it is usually taking whole bean coffee, and just lightly crushing it into big pieces, rather than grinding it like you would for coffee. makes it easier to filter out, and the alcohol seems to do fine with the very coarse crush.

Yeah, that's the way I do it.

Its the next method on my list for coffee flavor. Probably will do a Coffee Stout this fall. So far, I have done straight espresso (1 shot per pint, in the bottle at bottling) and cold brewed. Cold brewed has been my favorite so far, but I would like a bit more aroma than I got out of the cold brewed.
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: maris otter in stout
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2014, 09:44:02 AM »
When I hear about it at Homebrew Club or otherwise, it is usually taking whole bean coffee, and just lightly crushing it into big pieces, rather than grinding it like you would for coffee. makes it easier to filter out, and the alcohol seems to do fine with the very coarse crush.

Yeah, that's the way I do it.

+2. Same here. It doesn't leave sediment that way, and using it in keg I think the alcohol extracts really nice flavor. It's cold steeping in beer.
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