Author Topic: High pitch temperature  (Read 1074 times)

Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2014, 06:46:43 PM »
Well I kind of winged it based on memory from previous success, but all the recipes I have worked with use fruit right at the beginning.  I love what it does to the flavor.  It comes off very natural just like a good balance between hops and malt.  I don't like overly flavored fruit beers ie Sam Adams cherry wheat( I really dislike that beer).   Anyway the idea is to get the fruit over 160 before chilling and putting into the wort and pitching. Then after about 5 days you strain out the fruit and rack to secondary.


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Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2014, 07:02:42 PM »
It's a raspberry wit based on my success on a few grand Cru recipes  ... minus the coriander and orange. 


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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2014, 07:28:13 AM »
Cool, stand corrected guys. I always thought that ~ or not much over 100F was pretty near to yeast cell death.

That's one of those things that gets passed around without any evidence. If that were true then all yeast would die every summer. At least here, where the summer can go over 100F for a month or two straight.
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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2014, 09:12:28 AM »
Cool, stand corrected guys. I always thought that ~ or not much over 100F was pretty near to yeast cell death.

That's one of those things that gets passed around without any evidence. If that were true then all yeast would die every summer. At least here, where the summer can go over 100F for a month or two straight.

Yeah, I think it's probably something I picked up from one the sub-par brewing books or articles back in the 90s and it stuck in my head. I guess if it taught me to be extra sure to pitch and ferment cool, it could be worse.
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Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2014, 07:23:57 PM »
SO ... the beer turned out quite well, the swamp cooler must have saved the day?  It is getting a lot of attention and being drunk very vast.  Three different people have tasted it and stated it tasted like a lighter Frambrose minus the sour.  I can only conclude that  if there are off flavors, they are covered up well.  Yet I must say, given its very smooth finish ( thanks to low hops and 2 lbs of honey), I am surprised I cannot detect any.  So this brings me a few points/questions,

1) Given my risk for off flavor, when would I taste them in this particular beer?  When I smell it, at the beginning, throughout,  after I swallow etc?

2) I used honey to create a dry smooth finish and thus one of my biggest fears was that this would get over shadowed by off flavors.  Yet what I got was similar to a previous cru ( the base for this raspberry) that I have made, very mild all but unnoticeable esters with a tiny bit of spice to bring it home.  But with the cru the fermentation temp never got past 66 and took forever ( two months... I only used one starter ).  I know this wit strain is known for low ester with mild spice flavor,  but I still feel like I got away with murder.  Has anyone has similar experiences with this yeast?  Is this what I should have expected?

Here is my Ingredient list:

5 lbs Briess Pilsen light
2 lbs Weyerman pale wheat malt
2 lbs organic wildflower honey ( could care less about organic, but wildflower definitely has a different taste)

1 oz whole Hallertauer hops (boiling)
1/2 oz Hallertauer hops whole flavor
1/2 Hallertauer hops ( aroma)
5 lbs of raspberries held a little over 160 for 20 minutes before being added post boil

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Offline pete b

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #20 on: June 10, 2014, 07:45:41 PM »
SO ... the beer turned out quite well, the swamp cooler must have saved the day?  It is getting a lot of attention and being drunk very vast.  Three different people have tasted it and stated it tasted like a lighter Frambrose minus the sour.  I can only conclude that  if there are off flavors, they are covered up well.  Yet I must say, given its very smooth finish ( thanks to low hops and 2 lbs of honey), I am surprised I cannot detect any.  So this brings me a few points/questions,

1) Given my risk for off flavor, when would I taste them in this particular beer?  When I smell it, at the beginning, throughout,  after I swallow etc?

2) I used honey to create a dry smooth finish and thus one of my biggest fears was that this would get over shadowed by off flavors.  Yet what I got was similar to a previous cru ( the base for this raspberry) that I have made, very mild all but unnoticeable esters with a tiny bit of spice to bring it home.  But with the cru the fermentation temp never got past 66 and took forever ( two months... I only used one starter ).  I know this wit strain is known for low ester with mild spice flavor,  but I still feel like I got away with murder.  Has anyone has similar experiences with this yeast?  Is this what I should have expected?

Here is my Ingredient list:

5 lbs Briess Pilsen light
2 lbs Weyerman pale wheat malt
2 lbs organic wildflower honey ( could care less about organic, but wildflower definitely has a different taste)

1 oz whole Hallertauer hops (boiling)
1/2 oz Hallertauer hops whole flavor
1/2 Hallertauer hops ( aroma)
5 lbs of raspberries held a little over 160 for 20 minutes before being added post boil

Wyeast 3944 - 2 packs
I wonder if the honey was the saving grace. If you ever made mead you know honey takes quite a while to ferment. I wonder if having honey as a significant part of the fermentables slowed things down enough to not produce fusels etc?
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Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #21 on: June 10, 2014, 07:53:13 PM »
Did not know that,  very thankful if this is the case.



Offline morticaixavier

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #22 on: June 10, 2014, 08:11:17 PM »
I think you got the temp down quickly enough to prevent any major problems. It's possible that if someone who is very sensitive to fusels tried it they would get a bit headachy but possibly not even that.

(and just on the pedantic side of things, 'I could care less' means that something is at least somewhat important to you while 'I could NOT care less' means that something is the least important thing possible to you)
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Offline pete b

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2014, 08:40:19 PM »
I think you got the temp down quickly enough to prevent any major problems. It's possible that if someone who is very sensitive to fusels tried it they would get a bit headachy but possibly not even that.

(and just on the pedantic side of things, 'I could care less' means that something is at least somewhat important to you while 'I could NOT care less' means that something is the least important thing possible to you)
I agree that getting this cooled down fast helped. In the future I could care both less and more if you pitch your yeast at that temperature.
Renunciation is not giving up the things of the world, but accepting that they go away.
Suzuki Roshi

Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2014, 08:45:38 PM »
So my pitch temperature is at least somewhat important to you?   :)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2014, 09:16:16 PM »
YOUR pitching temp is why we are here.

Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2014, 09:18:51 PM »
 Just responding to the pedantry above,  should have put a quote in. Thank you all for your insight,  it has been very helpful.


« Last Edit: June 11, 2014, 12:38:23 AM by frochild »

Offline a10t2

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2014, 05:53:53 AM »
Technically, it's spelled pœdantry...
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Offline frochild

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2014, 06:02:39 AM »
:)



Offline morticaixavier

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Re: High pitch temperature
« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2014, 07:50:41 AM »
Technically, it's spelled pœdantry...
gah!
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time"
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