Author Topic: IPA Recipe  (Read 1300 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2014, 11:13:57 AM »
Much of this may have to do with Climate. It's hot and sticky where I am and what I want is a dry beer that will quench my thirst, especially when I drink IPAs.

I think that's part of it for me too. It's already hot and humid here, and a dry IPA just quenches the thirst a lot better (to me) when it's sticky, aside from my feelings on lots of crystal and 'C' hops.
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Offline Kinetic

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2014, 01:45:34 PM »
Quote
Depends on what you're after. If the goal in a low mash temp is to attenuate well (with a low FG) and have,for example, what the Belgians call a 'digestible' beer , then it seems counterproductive to drive the FG back up with unfermentables. I'm not saying it can't ever have a place in beer, but I'd rather control body with mash temp most times. YMMV.

8oz of Carapils in a 5.5 gallon batch will increase FG by 0.001 gravity point at a low mash temp without increasing subjective sweetness while adding more body than the same beer mashed higher that finishes at the same gravity and sweeter.

Like you said.  It all depends on what you want to achieve.  Carapils can achieve things that can't be duplicated by the same grist without Carapils at a higher mash temp.






Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2014, 03:36:28 PM »
Quote
Depends on what you're after. If the goal in a low mash temp is to attenuate well (with a low FG) and have,for example, what the Belgians call a 'digestible' beer , then it seems counterproductive to drive the FG back up with unfermentables. I'm not saying it can't ever have a place in beer, but I'd rather control body with mash temp most times. YMMV.

8oz of Carapils in a 5.5 gallon batch will increase FG by 0.001 gravity point at a low mash temp without increasing subjective sweetness while adding more body than the same beer mashed higher that finishes at the same gravity and sweeter.

Like you said.  It all depends on what you want to achieve.  Carapils can achieve things that can't be duplicated by the same grist without Carapils at a higher mash temp.







I'm not (and wasn't) saying that Carapils has no place in brewing. I've used it and get its potential uses clearly. But there are a lot of options in AG brewing to get to an end result, and the cool thing is we can all choose our own approach. 
Jon H.

Offline majorvices

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2014, 05:27:06 AM »
Quote
Depends on what you're after. If the goal in a low mash temp is to attenuate well (with a low FG) and have,for example, what the Belgians call a 'digestible' beer , then it seems counterproductive to drive the FG back up with unfermentables. I'm not saying it can't ever have a place in beer, but I'd rather control body with mash temp most times. YMMV.

8oz of Carapils in a 5.5 gallon batch will increase FG by 0.001 gravity point at a low mash temp without increasing subjective sweetness while adding more body than the same beer mashed higher that finishes at the same gravity and sweeter.

Like you said.  It all depends on what you want to achieve.  Carapils can achieve things that can't be duplicated by the same grist without Carapils at a higher mash temp.

I brewed an all Pilsner base malt IPA with carapils to bump up the body inspired by this thread yesterday. :) But I stick by my original remarks... I don't "think" you need the carapils in this recipe. Not am absolute, just a suggestion. I think that there are too many IPAs out there with too much perceived body. And there is no suggested mash temp. So in reality, in this recipe, I'm not sure what the carapils would be for. But maybe it's exactly what the OP wants.

First time I used cara pils in an IPA recipe was 10 years ago in a Russian River Pliny cone and that turned out pretty good, but Ive not used it in an IPA recipoe since and they've turned out purdy good, too.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2014, 09:12:14 AM »
Quote
Depends on what you're after. If the goal in a low mash temp is to attenuate well (with a low FG) and have,for example, what the Belgians call a 'digestible' beer , then it seems counterproductive to drive the FG back up with unfermentables. I'm not saying it can't ever have a place in beer, but I'd rather control body with mash temp most times. YMMV.

8oz of Carapils in a 5.5 gallon batch will increase FG by 0.001 gravity point at a low mash temp without increasing subjective sweetness while adding more body than the same beer mashed higher that finishes at the same gravity and sweeter.

Like you said.  It all depends on what you want to achieve.  Carapils can achieve things that can't be duplicated by the same grist without Carapils at a higher mash temp.

I brewed an all Pilsner base malt IPA with carapils to bump up the body inspired by this thread yesterday. :) But I stick by my original remarks... I don't "think" you need the carapils in this recipe. Not am absolute, just a suggestion. I think that there are too many IPAs out there with too much perceived body. And there is no suggested mash temp. So in reality, in this recipe, I'm not sure what the carapils would be for. But maybe it's exactly what the OP wants.

First time I used cara pils in an IPA recipe was 10 years ago in a Russian River Pliny cone and that turned out pretty good, but Ive not used it in an IPA recipoe since and they've turned out purdy good, too.

You will have a very nice beer. For the record I really like 100% Pilsner malt Pilsners. No problems with body or head retention.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2014, 02:31:03 PM »
For the record I really like 100% Pilsner malt Pilsners. No problems with body or head retention.

+1.  I have 2 Pilsners on tap now (Bo and German) and used 100% Pils malt in both. I'm pleased with the body and head retention on both.  As a derail, I used all Avangard pils for the first time on the German pils - my LHBS dropped Weyermann in favor of Avangard, so I gave it a shot. And I think it's a very nice pilsner malt. I'll be using it again.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2014, 03:21:26 PM »
Yep. My pils recipe is 100% pils malt. Haven't brewed that one in a while though.
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Offline nicosan1

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2014, 03:26:11 PM »
One other question I had was on Water for this IPA. I live in Brooklyn so our water is pretty soft. I just picked up John Palmer's book on Water to get a better understanding of what water additions are appropriate for my beer, still have much to read.  Suggestions on what I should add and when I should add it?  Had gypsum in the kettle. 

This is the Water profile I get from the city, averages obviously.

pH - 7.3
Calcium - 5.8
Chloride - 9
Phosphate - 2.3
Sulfate - 4.4
Magnesium - 1.3

What are your suggestions? Add 5grams gysum? Calcium?  When: Mash or Kettle? I want my hops to be profiled and add a bit of dryness without say mashing at 148 and getting a thin beer. thinking about 150-151.

Welcome your suggestions.

Offline Steve in TX

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2014, 03:31:33 PM »
I use McDole's water profile for all of my hoppy beers. You would add both mash and kettle salts. It requires gypsum, Epsom, canning salt (I use kosher) and calcium chloride.

Bru'n water is indispensable.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2014, 03:33:00 PM »
In my opinion there isn't really a noticable difference between mashing at 148 and 151.

You want to bump your sulfate up above 300ppm. do this with a combo of gypsum and epsom salts to prevent overloading with calcium.

If you need more calcium in the mash to control pH then add some gypsum there, otherwise go ahead and add it to the kettle.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2014, 03:37:54 PM »
One other question I had was on Water for this IPA. I live in Brooklyn so our water is pretty soft. I just picked up John Palmer's book on Water to get a better understanding of what water additions are appropriate for my beer, still have much to read.  Suggestions on what I should add and when I should add it?  Had gypsum in the kettle. 

This is the Water profile I get from the city, averages obviously.

pH - 7.3
Calcium - 5.8
Chloride - 9
Phosphate - 2.3
Sulfate - 4.4
Magnesium - 1.3

What are your suggestions? Add 5grams gysum? Calcium?  When: Mash or Kettle? I want my hops to be profiled and add a bit of dryness without say mashing at 148 and getting a thin beer. thinking about 150-151.

Welcome your suggestions.

I highly recommend downloading Bru'nWater. It has a 'Pale Ale Profile' that will lay out the amounts of gypsum to add based on your batch size and grist makeup, to achieve a good pH (first and foremost) and secondly to get the level of dryness that you and I like in IPA. Using gypsum will also raise your calcium level btw, which you need since yours is low.
Jon H.

Offline nicosan1

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2014, 04:28:11 PM »
In my opinion there isn't really a noticable difference between mashing at 148 and 151.

You want to bump your sulfate up above 300ppm. do this with a combo of gypsum and epsom salts to prevent overloading with calcium.

If you need more calcium in the mash to control pH then add some gypsum there, otherwise go ahead and add it to the kettle.

With this, I entered the info into Brewer Friend Calculator and got my levels as the following if I add 5 grams of Gypsum and about 3 grams of Epsom Salts to the kettle.

Ca+2 - 50
   
Mg+2 - 13
   
SO4-2 - 153
   
Na+ - 8
   
Cl-9
   
HCO3-0
   


Does that look about where I want to be? seems to be fairly close to the range of most, maybe slightly low on calcium for light ale hoppy

Offline nicosan1

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Re: IPA Recipe
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2014, 04:32:02 PM »
One other question I had was on Water for this IPA. I live in Brooklyn so our water is pretty soft. I just picked up John Palmer's book on Water to get a better understanding of what water additions are appropriate for my beer, still have much to read.  Suggestions on what I should add and when I should add it?  Had gypsum in the kettle. 

This is the Water profile I get from the city, averages obviously.

pH - 7.3
Calcium - 5.8
Chloride - 9
Phosphate - 2.3
Sulfate - 4.4
Magnesium - 1.3

What are your suggestions? Add 5grams gysum? Calcium?  When: Mash or Kettle? I want my hops to be profiled and add a bit of dryness without say mashing at 148 and getting a thin beer. thinking about 150-151.

Welcome your suggestions.

I highly recommend downloading Bru'nWater. It has a 'Pale Ale Profile' that will lay out the amounts of gypsum to add based on your batch size and grist makeup, to achieve a good pH (first and foremost) and secondly to get the level of dryness that you and I like in IPA. Using gypsum will also raise your calcium level btw, which you need since yours is low.

I downloaded and will play around with this excel file.  Thanks!