Author Topic: Wyeast 1272 American II  (Read 7423 times)

Offline a10t2

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #30 on: October 15, 2015, 07:39:09 PM »
Mark, could you define "slow starter"?  I haven't used 1272 in years but I don't recall it being any slower than anything else.  So I'm wondering if slow starts are normal for me.

I don't note lag time, but I can't recall ever not seeing active fermentation the next morning. So maybe 18 hours max. I don't brew with other strains nearly as often but I think that's more or less normal for my other ales.
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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2015, 07:54:24 PM »
I do not like using the phrase "lag time" because what most home brewers refer to as lag time is actually composed of the lag phase and the exponential phase.  A fermentation is usually well into the exponential phase before we start seeing signs of fermentation.

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #32 on: October 15, 2015, 08:22:06 PM »
Mark, could you define "slow starter"?  I haven't used 1272 in years but I don't recall it being any slower than anything else.  So I'm wondering if slow starts are normal for me.

I don't note lag time, but I can't recall ever not seeing active fermentation the next morning. So maybe 18 hours max. I don't brew with other strains nearly as often but I think that's more or less normal for my other ales.

Yeah, that's normal for me and about what I recall from 1272.  Not really any different than anything else.
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Offline neddles

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2015, 09:34:17 PM »
Mark, could you define "slow starter"?  I haven't used 1272 in years but I don't recall it being any slower than anything else.  So I'm wondering if slow starts are normal for me.

I don't note lag time, but I can't recall ever not seeing active fermentation the next morning. So maybe 18 hours max. I don't brew with other strains nearly as often but I think that's more or less normal for my other ales.


Yeah, that's normal for me and about what I recall from 1272.  Not really any different than anything else.
+1 Takes off like almost every other yeast I've used.

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2015, 09:45:02 PM »
Yeah, that's normal for me and about what I recall from 1272.  Not really any different than anything else.

I think that the difference is due to your proximity to Wyeast.   What I have noticed is that BRY 97 seems to lose viability quicker than other strains.   I have only repitched this strain one time.  The time to active fermentation on the repitch was twelve hours.  The initial time to active fermentation was 26 hours with WLP051 (the same strain).   I did not pitch a huge amount of yeast on the repitch.  I have had BRY 97 dry take over 48 hours to start.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2015, 09:54:51 PM »
Mark, could you define "slow starter"?  I haven't used 1272 in years but I don't recall it being any slower than anything else.  So I'm wondering if slow starts are normal for me.

I don't note lag time, but I can't recall ever not seeing active fermentation the next morning. So maybe 18 hours max. I don't brew with other strains nearly as often but I think that's more or less normal for my other ales.


Yeah, that's normal for me and about what I recall from 1272.  Not really any different than anything else.
+1 Takes off like almost every other yeast I've used.

Agreed. I can't claim to have used BRY97 but 1272 has taken off for me comparable to most any liquid ale culture I've used. I've used it many times.
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Offline dzlater

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2015, 10:39:21 AM »
.............. If using dry Bry 97, it is important to pitch at least 1 gram per liter (i.e., two packages in a 5-gallon batch).

I usde this yeast quite often and am wondering why two packets?
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2015, 12:48:01 PM »
.............. If using dry Bry 97, it is important to pitch at least 1 gram per liter (i.e., two packages in a 5-gallon batch).

I usde this yeast quite often and am wondering why two packets?
Im going to guess the Mark will say due to 50% attrition rate from osmotic pressure of the solute

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2015, 12:53:22 PM »
.............. If using dry Bry 97, it is important to pitch at least 1 gram per liter (i.e., two packages in a 5-gallon batch).
I usde this yeast quite often and am wondering why two packets?
I missed this statement initially, but that may explain why the dry BRY-97 behaved so well for me. The one time I used it I pitched a full pack into 2 gallons of wort. I was also aware of some issues with lag time, so I went heavy on the oxygen to see if that helped. Fermentation started a little slower than US-05 in a similar batch, but nothing drastic.
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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #39 on: October 16, 2015, 01:45:52 PM »
I usde this yeast quite often and am wondering why two packets?

Lallemand suggests a pitching rate of 100 grams per 100 liters, which is a pitching rate of 1 gram per liter.  BRY 97 is the only strain dry strain that I heed their advice because it is such a slow starter.

http://www.danstaryeast.com/system/files/pdfs/tds-bry-97-american-west-coast-yeast-english.pdf?download=1



Offline dilluh98

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2015, 03:49:23 PM »
I prefer Bry 97 (Wyeast 1272 and White Labs WLP051) to Bry 96 (Wyeast 1056 and White Labs WLP001) as well.

I recently split a batch of a pretty straightforward IPA (based on the BCS AIPA) between WLP051 and WLP090 (which I consider to be WLP001 on steroids). My west coast IPA loving wife enjoyed the WLP090 obviously but she hated the WLP051 and I can’t say I was enamored with it either. This is the first time I’ve brewed with it and it was the first pitch so I’ll hold further judgement until I get to the 2nd and 3rd pitches but it really muted a lot of the flavors and made everything kind of just meld together in a way I don’t like for a standard IPA. I’m thinking of trying it on an APA that’s meant to taste more round and “juicy” so to speak. I think its character might play well there - at least for my tastes.

Offline hopshead

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2015, 07:07:55 PM »


There is a picture of my top crop plus some beer in a gallon glass jug for what it's worth.

Offline JKBREWINGJPKT

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #42 on: October 29, 2015, 03:20:21 PM »
BRY 97 is slow to start, and the use of a stir plate did not improve the situation.  Stir plates can stress yeast cells.

Well, there is about an inch high krausen ring in the carboy and after the first couple days I noticed that the stopper had been pushed up and wasn't fully seated. So not sure if it was briefly vigorous then lost pressure and had some air leak in and slowed up or what. Never was vigorously bubbling when I observed it but it fermented continuously slowly for two weeks. It has ended up at about 1.017 now so only about 4% but that may be attributable to the mash temp of 154/55ish.  It tastes normal if a bit malty but to be expected with that gravity. Balanced well with hops and dry hopping now so hopefully it worked out ok. Just don't remember fermentation being that slow last time we made this.

Offline 69franx

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #43 on: October 29, 2015, 08:58:27 PM »
If pitching 2 packs of bry97 into 5 gallons and it's a slow starter, is rehydration necessary or recommended? This will be for my attempt at Steele's Ballantine recipe from his book, targeting 1.074 IIRC
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Wyeast 1272 American II
« Reply #44 on: October 29, 2015, 09:09:18 PM »
If pitching 2 packs of bry97 into 5 gallons and it's a slow starter, is rehydration necessary or recommended? This will be for my attempt at Steele's Ballantine recipe from his book, targeting 1.074 IIRC

Necessary, no; recommended, yes. Not much point in doubling up on the pitching rate if you're going to kill off half the cells.
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