Author Topic: CO2 outside fridge  (Read 1583 times)

Offline goschman

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2337
    • View Profile
CO2 outside fridge
« on: June 26, 2014, 08:53:09 AM »
My 20# CO2 tank is currently in the fridge with 3 kegs. I am planning to move it out so I have room for 4 kegs. What should I use to seal the hole that I drill for hose from the CO2 tank?

My buddy suggested plumbers putty?
On Tap/Bottled:                       
Kolsch / Mexican Vienna / Asian Lager / XPA #5 / Baltic Porter / LeRye Golsch
              
Fermenting: American Extra Bitter
Up Next: Summer Ale, Pale Lager, XPA #6: Comet/Cascade/Ahtanum

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4692
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2014, 08:54:42 AM »
Plumbers putty would work, or silicone sealant. Another option would be to drill the hole a bit smaller than the gas line and wedge it through with some keg lube.

Offline Jeff M

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 821
  • Currently upgrading to Brewery 3.0
    • View Profile
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4692
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2014, 09:10:34 AM »
That's nice. I've seen others do the same thing with three pieces. Single piece = less points of failure.

Offline goschman

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2337
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2014, 09:14:00 AM »
Cool! So I would just need another hose to connect to the manifold...
On Tap/Bottled:                       
Kolsch / Mexican Vienna / Asian Lager / XPA #5 / Baltic Porter / LeRye Golsch
              
Fermenting: American Extra Bitter
Up Next: Summer Ale, Pale Lager, XPA #6: Comet/Cascade/Ahtanum

Offline Jeff M

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 821
  • Currently upgrading to Brewery 3.0
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2014, 09:16:46 AM »
Correct, a flare fitting on each side will work perfect.  Id just call them and verify the length of the bulkhead to make sure it will fit your needs.  ive seen a few different legnths ont he market, 3 inch and 4.25.  Make the calla nd make sure its what you need.
Cheers
Jeff
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline beersk

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3008
  • In the night!
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2014, 11:13:09 AM »
I have 9/16" OD gas line, and I just drilled the hole 9/16". The hose fits pretty snug and I doubt it's a problem.
None More Black!

Jesse

Offline Jeff M

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 821
  • Currently upgrading to Brewery 3.0
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2014, 11:20:50 AM »
I have 9/16" OD gas line, and I just drilled the hole 9/16". The hose fits pretty snug and I doubt it's a problem.

The biggest issue with this is that its not air tight.  Because the inside of the cooler is cold and the outside is warmer and more humid, the cooler will essentially suck in moisture from the outside causing more condensation build up.  If you go this route make sure you chalk around the hose and get it as airtight as possible.

Cheers,
Jeff
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline Slowbrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2164
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2014, 11:28:14 AM »
Use this.

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/1-4-mfl-bulkhead-adapter.html

ITs even on sale

this is what it looks like
http://www.homebrewing.org/14-MFL-Bulkhead-Adaptor-4-Long_p_3373.html

That would have worked great on my build years ago.  Very cool.  On my build I added a gas-in keg connector on the outside and use a standard QD from the regulator. 

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline BrewArk

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
  • Rick - Newark, California
    • View Profile
    • BrewArk
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2014, 11:53:49 AM »
I have 9/16" OD gas line, and I just drilled the hole 9/16". The hose fits pretty snug and I doubt it's a problem.

The biggest issue with this is that its not air tight.  Because the inside of the cooler is cold and the outside is warmer and more humid, the cooler will essentially suck in moisture from the outside causing more condensation build up.  If you go this route make sure you chalk around the hose and get it as airtight as possible.

Cheers,
Jeff

I never sealed mine.  I drilled the hole the same size as my line.  I could get the line through, but it is snug.  I suppose I could silicone seal it but there is so little transfer that I haven't had a problem.

Disclaimer:
I keep the cooler relatively warm for serving, and I live in a dry climate.  Your results may vary.
Beer...Now there's a temporary solution!

Na Zdraví

Offline Jimmy K

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3646
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2014, 12:04:53 PM »
I have 9/16" OD gas line, and I just drilled the hole 9/16". The hose fits pretty snug and I doubt it's a problem.

The biggest issue with this is that its not air tight.  Because the inside of the cooler is cold and the outside is warmer and more humid, the cooler will essentially suck in moisture from the outside causing more condensation build up.  If you go this route make sure you chalk around the hose and get it as airtight as possible.

Cheers,
Jeff

I never sealed mine.  I drilled the hole the same size as my line.  I could get the line through, but it is snug.  I suppose I could silicone seal it but there is so little transfer that I haven't had a problem.
Me too. I think opening the door is going to cause far more air exchange. If the temp inside decreases, it will suck in air. But if the temp inside doesn't change and pressures are equalized it is not going to continually draw in air. The only exception would be a newer fridge/freezer that uses a pump to draw a slight vacuum to seal the door.
Delmarva United Homebrewers - President by inverse coup - former president ousted himself.
AHA Member since 2006
BJCP Certified: B0958

S. cerevisiae

  • Guest
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2014, 12:45:39 PM »
I used an MFL bulkhead with a female flare to keg post adapter and a ball lock gas plug for my CO2 tank to refrigerator connection. I used a nut and a stem in the inside to connect gas line to a manifold.   I use my CO2 tank while cleaning kegs, so this type of setup is perfect for me.  It also allows me to disconnect my CO2 tank from the refrigerator and take it to a function.



[/URL]


Offline Jeff M

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 821
  • Currently upgrading to Brewery 3.0
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2014, 12:50:07 PM »
Looks nice and clean.  Not sure id drill threw the refridgerator body myself.  with my luck id need a new fridge:D
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

S. cerevisiae

  • Guest
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2014, 01:41:32 PM »
I owned this brewing refrigerator for 15 years before I mustered the courage to take a drill to it. 

Offline wedwards

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 outside fridge
« Reply #14 on: June 30, 2014, 07:13:51 AM »
Awesome idea.  How did you work out how to find a spot to drill a hole that doesn't cut through the cooling elements in the wall of the refrigerator? I want to do this with my freezer but I'm pretty sure the walls are full of cooling pipes and stuff.