Author Topic: Green malt  (Read 642 times)

Offline pete b

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Green malt
« on: July 07, 2014, 02:15:42 AM »
Anyone ever do anything with green (unkilned) malt? I haven't found much info online other than vague warnings of "green negative flavors" or more specific potential problems that are really theoretical, because no one commenting  seems to have tried it. It seems possible that there could be some positive traits that, in moderation, would be worth the potential downsides. I'm thinking of doing some small batch experiments when my barley is ready to malt. I'm not sure how I will crush it. I understand some distillers use green malt when making whisky.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2014, 02:47:08 AM »
It's going to be highly enzymatic with no drying our kilning. Which is why I imagine distillers would use it. Particularly if you are trying to convert 51% corn mash
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Offline pete b

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2014, 01:36:19 PM »
It's going to be highly enzymatic with no drying our kilning. Which is why I imagine distillers would use it. Particularly if you are trying to convert 51% corn mash
So maybe it would improve sugar extraction in a mash?
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Offline kramerog

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2014, 02:15:51 PM »
It's going to be highly enzymatic with no drying our kilning. Which is why I imagine distillers would use it. Particularly if you are trying to convert 51% corn mash
So maybe it would improve sugar extraction in a mash?

In a 100% malt beer it is unlikely to improve extraction but would likely increase attenuation with a lower temp mash, possibly dramatically, as green malt should have much higher amounts of beta-amylase and limit dextrinase.

In an adjunct mash, it might also improve extraction.

Green malt likely will have a ton of the DMS precursor.

Offline pete b

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2014, 03:20:41 PM »

Green malt likely will have a ton of the DMS precursor.
[/quote]
I have read that green malt would have more dms precursor. I was thinking of doing a long boil to mitigate that.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2014, 03:22:06 PM »
It's an interesting experiment for sure. I don't think that it would gain you anything unless you were using a very high percentage of non-ezymatic adjuncts that needed to be converted.

That being said, I think you should go for it and see what happens.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Green malt
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2014, 03:41:58 PM »
It's an interesting experiment for sure. I don't think that it would gain you anything unless you were using a very high percentage of non-ezymatic adjuncts that needed to be converted.

That being said, I think you should go for it and see what happens.
I think I might make a gallon with just green to check out the taste and see what gravity x amount gets me. I expect it to be bland since a lot of the flavor in malt comes from the maillard reactions during kilning. What I would hope for is an unusual flavor that is appropriate for some styles. even if it turns out to not add any interesting (in a good way) flavors I think I could do some interesting things combining it with adjuncts, assuming no strong off flavors are produced.
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