Author Topic: Trying to decide what to call a beer that stradles the style divide.  (Read 874 times)

Offline Steve L

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I recently brewed an IPA that I wanted to enter into a comp. The hop flavor and aroma was right  but I think it lacks the resinous hop flavor of an IPA. It does have the right bitterness and hop aroma but has a more pronounced caramel flavor much in the style of an ESB. Essentially I've brewed a hoppy ESB. I can adjust it on future brews but it's a darn nice beer.

I feel like this most likely fits more in the English IPA category as opposed to the American IPA. I know it's difficult for anyone to decide without a taste test but I'm looking for suggestions. Have you ever brewed a beer and when all was said and done it became a different style than you aimed for?

My final recipe and results were as follows:

batch size - 2.5 gal.
IBU-63
ABV-6.3%
SRM-7

5 lbs Pale Malt, Maris Otter
13.2 oz Vienna Malt (Weyermann)
3.3 oz Cara-Pils/Dextrine
3.3 oz Caramel Malt - 40L (Briess)

0.35 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Boil 75.0 min Hop 5 24.8 IBUs
0.23 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Boil 45.0 min Hop 6 14.5 IBUs
0.23 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Boil 30.0 min Hop 7 12.2 IBUs
0.35 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Boil 15.0 min Hop 8 11.8 IBUs
0.23 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Boil 0.0 min
0.42 oz Cascade [5.50 %] - Dry Hop 14.0 Days Hop 11 0.0 IBUs
0.42 oz Centennial [10.70 %] - Dry Hop 14.0 Days Hop 12 0.0 IBUs

 
Corripe Cervisiam

Offline gman23

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What yeast?

I assume that because of the Centennial and Cascade hops as well as the figures that it would have to be American IPA. Pretty sure you cannot use American hops in an English IPA...
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 11:25:10 PM by goschman »
On Tap/Bottled: Hopfenbier, Kurbis Marzen, Red Rye, Vienna Lager,      

Fermenting: Imperial Porter
Up Next: Maibock, Braunbier

Offline Steve L

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What yeast?

I assume that because of the Centennial and Cascade hops as well as the figures that it would have to be American IPA
That was what I was shooting for, but I didn't count on the malt flavor coming through quite as much as it did... Although it is quite nice.

I used WLP001. It's night quite as bright a malt flavor as say a Fuller's ESB but that's the general malt flavor I'm getting... in a subdued form.
My OG was 1.060 and it fermented down to 1.012.
Corripe Cervisiam

Offline HoosierBrew

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Is it bottled yet ?  If you fill from keg you could bring it to room temp and dry hop some more.
Jon H.

Offline Steve L

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Is it bottled yet ?  If you fill from keg you could bring it to room temp and dry hop some more.
Unfortunately we are bottled. about 3 weeks ago. Essentially I've got a Bell's Two Hearted with a bit more malt flavor. I feel like it needs a tad more bittering hops to balance the malt. unfortunately it seems that will have to come on the next brew. Just not sure if I should call it an American IPA. It seems to be in that grey area between styles.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 11:36:39 PM by swlusk »
Corripe Cervisiam

Offline brewinhard

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Could it not fit as an american pale ale?  Albeit maybe on the bigger side, but who knows?

Offline dmtaylor

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I am calculating 71 IBUs.  That sir is an American IPA, whether it's got malt balance or not.  Might not score perfectly in competition, but then again, American IPA is the most crazily bloated and competitive category in existence, so don't feel bad.
Dave

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Offline Steve L

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I am calculating 71 IBUs.  That sir is an American IPA, whether it's got malt balance or not.  Might not score perfectly in competition, but then again, American IPA is the most crazily bloated and competitive category in existence, so don't feel bad.
True. It is a tough and popular category. This weekend will be 4 weeks in the bottle. Competition is about 4 weeks away. I'm storing them in the fridge now... I wonder if that malt flavor will fade a bit, and will the hop flavor hold up? time will tell I suppose. I'm also beginning to wonder if my hop utilization may be a bit low due to my equipment. I am a stove top boiler. I get a good rolling boil but not a super vigorous one.
Corripe Cervisiam

Offline erockrph

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I bet you'll do better calling it an APA than an IPA in a comp. Regardless what the IBU's calculate as, if it tastes a bit caramelly and it's a bit more malt-forward than it fits the APA category better. If you're in a comp, you'll be up against a bunch of "Enjoy By" clones and similar if you go the IPA route.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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If the competition has an east coast IPA category then that might be a good place for it. Otherwise I would consider American pale ale as the best place for it, especially if a couple months passes between brewing and competition.
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Offline udubdawg

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the concept of allowing American citrusy hops in English Pale Ale and not in English IPA is one I find silly.  I believe it has to do with what was being brewed at the time of the guidelines, and note that the new draft guidelines include "A moderate to moderately-high hop aroma of floral, spicy-peppery or citrus-orange in nature is typical."  If a beer had the other aspects of a 2008 14A I'd not consider this a killer flaw.

If I were going this route I'd definitely use a little more characterful English yeast though, to drive home that it wasn't 'Merican.