Author Topic: Roeselare  (Read 5109 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Roeselare
« Reply #45 on: September 03, 2014, 01:19:30 AM »
Good tangent. Can a bug pro answer his question about bugs eating the sac yeast? If they do, what is the point of racking off the trub to secondary? Especially if secondarying for a long period of time?
I am not a pro, but with these styles of beers my thinking is that everything you know is wrong (comparing to normal brewingpractices).

Conduct a mash that leaves a lot of starch. Use 3 year old hops exposed to the air.
Expose wort to the air overnight.
Put into barrels that are inoculated.
Allow Pedio to do its thing, but depend on Brett to clean up Diacetyl after the Pedio.
And the bugs and critters will eat the leftovers from the yeast as the autolysis happens.

Compare and contrast to usual practice.

Jeff Rankert
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Roeselare
« Reply #46 on: September 03, 2014, 01:20:36 AM »
Good tangent. Can a bug pro answer his question about bugs eating the sac yeast? If they do, what is the point of racking off the trub to secondary? Especially if secondarying for a long period of time?
I am not a pro, but with these styles of beers my thinking is that everything you know is wrong (comparing to normal brewingpractices).

Conduct a mash that leaves a lot of starch. Use 3 year old hops exposed to the air.
Expose wort to the air overnight.
Put into barrels that are inoculated.
Allow Pedio to do its thing, but depend on Brett to clean up Diacetyl after the Pedio.
Allow a little O2 into the beer as it ages in the barrels.
And the bugs and critters will eat the leftovers from the yeast as the autolysis happens.

Compare and contrast to usual practice.

Jeff Rankert
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Roeselare
« Reply #47 on: September 03, 2014, 02:35:19 PM »
Good tangent. Can a bug pro answer his question about bugs eating the sac yeast? If they do, what is the point of racking off the trub to secondary? Especially if secondarying for a long period of time?
I am not a pro, but with these styles of beers my thinking is that everything you know is wrong (comparing to normal brewingpractices).

Conduct a mash that leaves a lot of starch. Use 3 year old hops exposed to the air.
Expose wort to the air overnight.
Put into barrels that are inoculated.
Allow Pedio to do its thing, but depend on Brett to clean up Diacetyl after the Pedio.
Allow a little O2 into the beer as it ages in the barrels.
And the bugs and critters will eat the leftovers from the yeast as the autolysis happens.

Compare and contrast to usual practice.

Unconverted starch is metabolized by pedio (and potentially brett, but much slower, if at all).

In Flanders-style sours, you're looking to get most of the acidity from Lactobacillus, so residual starch is unnecessary. For the same reason, aged hops should not be used, since their purpose in lambic is to inhibit Lacto.

These beers hit their peak earlier than lambic, and so the wort is brewed to accommodate. You don't want starch or the level of unfermentables produced by a turbid mash w/ lots of unmalted wheat. You DO want dextrin and flavor from crystal malts, and increased body/foam from a touch of oats or wheat.

It's on its way to be good for a first try. Unless the sour really comes on from behind, I think next time I will pitch lactic warm for the first week, then the roesalare. Or better yet, lactic then abbey then age on Brett.

This has become my SOP. I've actually started leaving sacch. out of the mix altogether and conducting 'primary' (alcoholic) fermentation with bretta (unless a gnarly bottling strain has survived in my mixed culture, which I doubt).
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Recipes, Brett/Bacteria Experiments: http://SouthHouseBeer.com/