Author Topic: Sour mash  (Read 450 times)

Offline petermmitchell

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Sour mash
« on: July 17, 2014, 06:59:04 AM »
Is there any need to have a separate mash tun for sour mashes?  Just wondering if there would be any sanitation issues with using my normal mash tun for sour mashes as well.  Thanks!


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Offline dkfick

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2014, 07:05:51 AM »
No. You're good to go.
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Offline Steve in TX

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2014, 07:09:35 AM »
The smell might be hard to get out if you are using a cooler tun. I left some grains overnight once out of laziness. I yacked while dumping them out and had to let the cooler soak with oxyclean for a few days to get the smell down. That was an extreme case.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2014, 11:12:09 AM »
It may retain the smell, affecting the taste of subsequent batches, but it shouldn't "infect" a subsequent mash which would be quickly boiled following the mash...but another extended sour mash could be affected in theory.
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Offline WhiteWolfBrewery

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2014, 12:27:25 PM »
Don't think I am getting this right.  Isn't the mash the same as any other beer?

Offline Steve in TX

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2014, 12:31:59 PM »
A sour mash uses lacto in the mash before boiling to sour a beer. Typically it is allowed to sour for a day or two, but maybe longer. It can leave some funky smells from the lacto and other bugs that were already on the grain.

Offline WhiteWolfBrewery

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2014, 03:43:41 PM »
Ok. Why do you sour the mash prior to boil and not in the fermenter?

Offline Steve in TX

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2014, 03:50:03 PM »
A sour mash in the kettle or mashtun helps to keep all your equipment downstream bug free. It also allows for greater control over how sour a beer will be in the end. A brewer can pour lacto into a warm (~100°) mashtun and taste daily to find the level of tartness they like.

All this talk is making me want to brew a berliner.

Souring in the kettle post sparge is a good option as well. A good fitting lid is required, but I have heard of others laying plastic wrap on the mash surface. From what I have heard, if you kettle is small enough, an oven with the light on is a good way to hold a warm mash over a day or two.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2014, 04:00:00 AM »
And with the lactobacillus on the grain husks as you mash, adding lactobacillus to the mash may be unnecessary.  It still can be added, of course.
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Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2014, 04:20:36 AM »
Grain is already covered in lacto and other bugs, so I wouldn't worry about contamination. But like others said you might not get the smell out. I doubt the smell alone would absorb enough to affect future batches but I might be wrong.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Sour mash
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2014, 05:29:26 AM »
In my experience the smell will be gone after your next batch.  No worries.  I have done that several times.
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