Author Topic: Crashing  (Read 720 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Crashing
« on: July 20, 2014, 09:57:52 PM »
I was just listening to some guy who coauthored the yeast book. He claimed that he found a study during his research that reports up to 30% increase in fruity ester production if you rapidly cool or cold crash at the end of fermentation as compared to gently cooling by dropping the temp a couple degrees per day. (June 3 14 Jamil Show)

Last winter I worked on lagers a bit. They got to be pretty good but still, what I called too aley, probably due to my cold crashing. When the beers were done I would set my temp at 32° and it would get there over night.

Any comments from experience on this? I'm looking forward to making this change when lager season comes around. If it's true, I think my lagers will reach that magic level I just couldn't find last year.

Offline beersk

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2014, 02:52:15 AM »
I haven't noticed it, but maybe because I haven't done the slow cooling method. There are many people who say it doesn't make a difference, but I don't know for sure.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2014, 12:06:59 PM »
I made a couple pilsners in the spring that came out very clean, and I didn't step down to lagering temps. Sampled both after D-rest and put the kegs in a 32F fridge to lager.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2014, 03:17:10 PM »
I wonder if that included a warm d-rest before crashing or if the research looked at beers going from fermentation temp directly to lagering.
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Offline denny

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2014, 03:23:37 PM »
I was just listening to some guy who coauthored the yeast book. He claimed that he found a study during his research that reports up to 30% increase in fruity ester production if you rapidly cool or cold crash at the end of fermentation as compared to gently cooling by dropping the temp a couple degrees per day. (June 3 14 Jamil Show)

Last winter I worked on lagers a bit. They got to be pretty good but still, what I called too aley, probably due to my cold crashing. When the beers were done I would set my temp at 32° and it would get there over night.

Any comments from experience on this? I'm looking forward to making this change when lager season comes around. If it's true, I think my lagers will reach that magic level I just couldn't find last year.

My experience differs.  I guess if you didn't allow enough time for fermentation to fully finish and clean up it could be possible.  OTOH, I have a batch of Rye IPA on tap where I did something very much like that.  Hit FG in 6 days so I crashed at 40F to drop the yeast out.  It had no increase in esters and actually was better than batches where I wait 3 weeks for the yeast to drop on its own.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2014, 04:12:50 PM »
I am learning to not trust single data points, even from notable people, especially if they don't reference the "study". But I might try this slow step down chilling next time I do a lager just to see if it fixes my issue. If it does, it could still be circumstantial because it won't be a side by side.

Thanks for the interesting replies guys

Offline denny

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Re: Crashing
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2014, 04:24:22 PM »
I am learning to not trust single data points, even from notable people, especially if they don't reference the "study". But I might try this slow step down chilling next time I do a lager just to see if it fixes my issue. If it does, it could still be circumstantial because it won't be a side by side.

You are a wise man.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell