Author Topic: Efficiency Confusion  (Read 930 times)

Online MDixon

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2014, 05:35:07 AM »
One thing to keep in mind is sugars are never boiled away, they are conserved. So what you wanted in the kettle post boil was 1.052 with 3 gallons or 52 x 3 = 156 points

You got 4 x 48 = 192 points

6lbs of grain has the potential of 6 x 36 = 216

So 192/216 = 89%

My gut tells me there is quite a bit of imprecision in your measurements based on that high efficiency so early in your AG brewing career. If you actually had 4 gallons even after all was said and done then based on your gravity measurement you had 4.68 gallons in the kettle (192/41)

If you want to hit a gravity precisely you can calculate exactly how long to boil once you establish your boil off rate. If you boil off a little too much, you can calculate how much water to add to end with a particular gravity. Of course all the measurements need to be precise. HTH
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Offline sbruening

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2014, 09:59:03 AM »
One thing to keep in mind is sugars are never boiled away, they are conserved. So what you wanted in the kettle post boil was 1.052 with 3 gallons or 52 x 3 = 156 points

You got 4 x 48 = 192 points

6lbs of grain has the potential of 6 x 36 = 216

So 192/216 = 89%

My gut tells me there is quite a bit of imprecision in your measurements based on that high efficiency so early in your AG brewing career. If you actually had 4 gallons even after all was said and done then based on your gravity measurement you had 4.68 gallons in the kettle (192/41)

If you want to hit a gravity precisely you can calculate exactly how long to boil once you establish your boil off rate. If you boil off a little too much, you can calculate how much water to add to end with a particular gravity. Of course all the measurements need to be precise. HTH

Hitting a specific gravity every time doesn't concern me as much as knowing what specific gravity I need to base my recipes off of to meet approximate style guidelines.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2014, 10:16:15 AM »
This may sound funny, but tasting like the style is more important than the numbers. (If your competing) Otherwise, tasting the way YOU like is most important

Offline 69franx

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2014, 12:03:00 PM »
This may sound funny, but tasting like the style is more important than the numbers. (If your competing) Otherwise, tasting the way YOU like is most important
+1
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2014, 01:16:08 PM »
I would dedicate a ruler or make lines on a nylon spoon or use some method to gauge your water precisely.  Use a bottle with a known specific volume to incrementally fill up your mash tun and boil kettle (unless they are virtually the same type of vessel - then just do it for one of them), going say, a gallon at a time and marking it on your ruler or spoon or stick or whatever, so that you can have a reasonably good gauge of volumes.  This will allow you to know your volumes as you go and allow for differing boil off rates given differing humidity levels, etc....  I have found this to be invaluable even now after many, many batches.  Once you get things dialed in, you will hit specific marks based on grain amounts almost without thinking.

Cheers! and welcome to the forum. Read Denny's bottom line for what most people think about this forum - a great place.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2014, 03:04:12 PM »
I would dedicate a ruler or make lines on a nylon spoon or use some method to gauge your water precisely.  Use a bottle with a known specific volume to incrementally fill up your mash tun and boil kettle (unless they are virtually the same type of vessel - then just do it for one of them), going say, a gallon at a time and marking it on your ruler or spoon or stick or whatever, so that you can have a reasonably good gauge of volumes.  This will allow you to know your volumes as you go and allow for differing boil off rates given differing humidity levels, etc....  I have found this to be invaluable even now after many, many batches.  Once you get things dialed in, you will hit specific marks based on grain amounts almost without thinking.



+1 to all of this.
Jon H.

Offline sbruening

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2014, 05:20:56 AM »
I would dedicate a ruler or make lines on a nylon spoon or use some method to gauge your water precisely.  Use a bottle with a known specific volume to incrementally fill up your mash tun and boil kettle (unless they are virtually the same type of vessel - then just do it for one of them), going say, a gallon at a time and marking it on your ruler or spoon or stick or whatever, so that you can have a reasonably good gauge of volumes.  This will allow you to know your volumes as you go and allow for differing boil off rates given differing humidity levels, etc....  I have found this to be invaluable even now after many, many batches.  Once you get things dialed in, you will hit specific marks based on grain amounts almost without thinking.

Cheers! and welcome to the forum. Read Denny's bottom line for what most people think about this forum - a great place.

This will be very helpful.  How would you go about marking the nylon rod for measurements?  Permanent marker?  Wouldn't that get into the beer?  Thanks.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2014, 05:31:39 AM by sbruening »

Offline brewcrew7

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2014, 06:55:37 AM »
You could look up "acid etching kettle" to find a way to make permanent markings on your kettle. Be sure to do the research before considering this (health caution, etc). I've done it on one pot of mine and like it so far.

About efficiency, I would agree with the others about volume/gravity measurements. You can be off by 1 qt anywhere in the process and be off your efficiency by 5% or so. That can also translate to 0.5lb base malt in a 5 gallon batch. Remember hot wort/water expands in volume 3-4%. Is that worth concern? You can weigh the practicality of seeking those lost or gained volumes against your sanity and the quality of your beer, it's up to you!

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Efficiency Confusion
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2014, 11:34:21 AM »

This will be very helpful.  How would you go about marking the nylon rod for measurements?  Permanent marker?  Wouldn't that get into the beer?  Thanks.

I used a magic marker on a nylon spoon, but it is in the wort so little time (I use it only for measuring gallons to the right level) that it can't make much of a difference.  Plus, I make 10 gallon batches almost exclusively, so I don't have it marked below 5 gallons.

Cheers!
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"