Author Topic: Water  (Read 1362 times)

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Water
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2014, 07:51:05 AM »
I buy RO water and adjust it in Bru'n Water. I have pretty good luck using the basic profiles for most beers. On a few beers I use specific location profiles (like Plzen) or modify one of the basic profiles. It is far and away the best water adjustment software I have used.
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Offline markpotts

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Re: Water
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2014, 04:31:30 AM »
I use my domestic water supply.
I have this tested for the relevant brewing ions once per year at a lab. And I also use a Hannah alkalinity checker to test my liquor before starting each brew.
I use campden tablets to remove chlorine and chloramine. What I do next will depend on the type of beer I am brewing. I use Bru'nWater to predict my mash pH and adjust the alkalinity usually with 35% sulphuric acid (have also used 80% phosphoric). Calcium sulphate and/or calcium chloride is then added to balance the profile towards hops or malt as the beer style dictates.
 
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Offline dkfick

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Re: Water
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2014, 08:07:54 AM »
I have a small portable RO filter system I use for all my water.  I occasionally use tap but I didn't like it being variable throughout the year so I use RO water so I pretty much know where my starting point it everytime.
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Water
« Reply #18 on: July 31, 2014, 08:51:24 AM »
I use RO water so I pretty much know where my starting point it everytime.

+1.  Yep.
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Offline 69franx

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Re: Water
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2014, 09:04:51 AM »
I use RO water so I pretty much know where my starting point it everytime.

+1.  Yep.
+2: Right where I am at now too
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Offline quattlebaum

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Re: Water
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2014, 07:01:35 AM »
Idaho Falls Water (Fall water supply)
Ca  66ppm
Mg  20ppm
Na  24ppm
Sulfate  39ppm
Chloride  14ppm
Bicarb  307ppm
Total Hardness 247ppm
Alkalinity  254ppm

I have sampled my water throughout the year at different times with very little variance.
My bicarb/alkalinity sucks so i cut with store bought RO at $2 for 5 gal for most beers.
Use 88% lactic to adjust mash to desired PH with respect to the grist. acidify sparge if needed with 88% lactic.
I defiantly use water software (brunwater), its a must.
Adjust ion concentration as desired for style
Monitor PH with 2 pt calibrated meter of mash, sparge, pre boil, post boil and finial beer PH
   

« Last Edit: August 02, 2014, 07:14:29 AM by quattlebaum »

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Water
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2014, 10:27:57 AM »
Spokane Valley water
Sodium 6
Potassium 2
Calcium 35
Magnesium 12
Total Hardness 138
Nitrate 1.5 (SAFE)
Sulfate 4
Chloride 7
Carbonate < 1
Bicarbonate 151
Total Alkalinity 124

My city water supply has fairly high bicarbonate level, but it is still low enough to be acidified using 70% or 85% phosporic acid when required without causing off flavors.  Also, this water does not contain chlorine or chloramines, so I usually brew straight from the tap.  Hoppy, light colored beers typically get gypsum, calcium chloride and the phosphoric acid, dark beers might get a little pickling lime rather than phosphoric acid.

I do 50/50 with bulk purchased RO water for beers calling for soft water, such as Czech pilsner.

And I also use the paid version of Bru'n Water  ;D.  I haven't lab tested my tap water different times of the year, but have talked with the water district who've told me it varies little throughout the year, which has been confirmed by my experience of hitting my pH year round based on the single water profile I use in Bru'n Water.  I always check my mash pH with ColorpHast strips, estimating the actual pH as .3 higher than indicated per Kai's and others' tests.

Offline HobsonDrake

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Re: Water
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2014, 10:37:24 AM »
Just started playing with water profiles. I found a water report that someone else posted from my city. I use the BeerSmith and adjust as needed for style.
Went a little crazy when I found my LHBS had additives in bulk. Like $.10-.25 an ounce. So I have more than I will ever use. :)
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Offline brick pig

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Re: Water
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2014, 02:26:52 PM »
I use my plain old ordinary municipal tap water. It tastes fine and my beers taste fine, so I don't question it.

Offline leejoreilly

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Re: Water
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2014, 06:55:32 AM »
I use my plain old ordinary municipal tap water. It tastes fine and my beers taste fine, so I don't question it.

I think that, after mastering a few basic techniques like sanitation, mashing/sparging, hitting fermentation temps, etc, most brewers are producing "pretty good" beers. Improvement beyond that point will be subtler, and require smaller, more detailed changes - the brewing equivalent of the law of diminishing returns. That's sort of where I am with water additions; my beer is pretty good (sometimes better than that), and I think I have the basics down, but further improvement may come from paying attention to mash pH, and making a few (minor) mineral and acid additions (to my municipal tap water). I have to admit, I'm excited just by the prospect of developing new expertise, but I also look forward to continually improving my beers. I guess at some point I'll be satisfied, and if that's where you are, that's great. But, in the mean time, I'm enjoying the process as much as the results.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Water
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2014, 07:34:23 AM »
I use my plain old ordinary municipal tap water. It tastes fine and my beers taste fine, so I don't question it.

I think that, after mastering a few basic techniques like sanitation, mashing/sparging, hitting fermentation temps, etc, most brewers are producing "pretty good" beers. Improvement beyond that point will be subtler, and require smaller, more detailed changes - the brewing equivalent of the law of diminishing returns. That's sort of where I am with water additions; my beer is pretty good (sometimes better than that), and I think I have the basics down, but further improvement may come from paying attention to mash pH, and making a few (minor) mineral and acid additions (to my municipal tap water). I have to admit, I'm excited just by the prospect of developing new expertise, but I also look forward to continually improving my beers. I guess at some point I'll be satisfied, and if that's where you are, that's great. But, in the mean time, I'm enjoying the process as much as the results.

well said!
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Water
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2014, 07:40:55 AM »
I use my plain old ordinary municipal tap water. It tastes fine and my beers taste fine, so I don't question it.

I think that, after mastering a few basic techniques like sanitation, mashing/sparging, hitting fermentation temps, etc, most brewers are producing "pretty good" beers. Improvement beyond that point will be subtler, and require smaller, more detailed changes - the brewing equivalent of the law of diminishing returns. That's sort of where I am with water additions; my beer is pretty good (sometimes better than that), and I think I have the basics down, but further improvement may come from paying attention to mash pH, and making a few (minor) mineral and acid additions (to my municipal tap water). I have to admit, I'm excited just by the prospect of developing new expertise, but I also look forward to continually improving my beers. I guess at some point I'll be satisfied, and if that's where you are, that's great. But, in the mean time, I'm enjoying the process as much as the results.

well said!

+2
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Water
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2014, 10:51:57 AM »
I am enjoying the process almost to the same extent of the result, but not quite as much.... ;D
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Water
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2014, 11:13:00 AM »
I am enjoying the process almost to the same extent of the result, but not quite as much.... ;D

I feel the same  :D    Almost, but not quite as much !
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Offline sambates

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Re: Water
« Reply #29 on: August 06, 2014, 11:30:07 AM »
I use my plain old ordinary municipal tap water. It tastes fine and my beers taste fine, so I don't question it.

I think that, after mastering a few basic techniques like sanitation, mashing/sparging, hitting fermentation temps, etc, most brewers are producing "pretty good" beers. Improvement beyond that point will be subtler, and require smaller, more detailed changes - the brewing equivalent of the law of diminishing returns. That's sort of where I am with water additions; my beer is pretty good (sometimes better than that), and I think I have the basics down, but further improvement may come from paying attention to mash pH, and making a few (minor) mineral and acid additions (to my municipal tap water). I have to admit, I'm excited just by the prospect of developing new expertise, but I also look forward to continually improving my beers. I guess at some point I'll be satisfied, and if that's where you are, that's great. But, in the mean time, I'm enjoying the process as much as the results.

well said!

Agreed! I have really hard water in my area, so for dark beers I usually do 100% tap water with cambden tablets and open container overnight to evaporate the chloramines. If it's an amber or golden beer, I will split my water with tap and distilled water. Sometimes I'm 50/50, other times I'm 80/20, and even shoot for 100% distilled if I'm rocking a helles. I also use Bru'n Water and it helps with putting in the local water profile and combating it with hitting your pH values without overdosing. I've dumped some of my first "salt-altered" beers that I added multiple minerals to because it tasted horrible. I suggest using a minimalistic approach and only starting with one or two types of different brewing salts. You'll get tons of answers, but go with what you feel is best. If it doesn't work, revamp and try again.
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