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Curious about hop flavor and yeast attenuation...

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Brewtweak:
I am constantly studying different techniques and phenomena in brewing. I have a question. let's say I'm brewing an IPA for a competition. Theoretically, hop compounds can potentially cling to yeast and drop out of solution during flocculation. This of course is dependent on a lot of factors. Would it be better to use a slightly less attenuative yeast strain and mash a little lower.., leaving a slightly more cloudy beer and keep more hop compounds in the beer or is it better to add additional hops to the beer and use a more attenuative yeast.  Since appearance is only 3 points on a scoresheet, is hop flavor more important than clarity? Just curious what you guys think...

HoosierBrew:
Actually, less attenuative strains like 1968 often (not always) drop clearer quicker than more attenuative, powdery ones that stay in solution until they finally finish their job and settle out. IMO the very easiest way to avoid yeast absorbing more of your hop character is to remove as much of the yeast from your beer as possible before dry hopping. As in :   1/   Leaving the beer in primary for say 2 - 3 weeks, rack to secondary or keg and dry hop , or
2/   After fermentation is verified done, cold crash the yeast ~ 32F for a few days, then rack to secondary or keg and dry hop.
Either way, you've effectively separated your beer from a lot of yeast. I've done this with 1056, not a terribly flocculent strain, many,many times.

Brewtweak:

--- Quote from: HoosierBrew on August 06, 2014, 05:13:00 PM ---Actually, less attenuative strains like 1968 often (not always) drop clearer quicker than more attenuative, powdery ones that stay in solution until they finally finish their job and settle out. IMO the very easiest way to avoid yeast absorbing more of your hop character is to remove as much of the yeast from your beer as possible before dry hopping. As in :   1/   Leaving the beer in primary for say 2 - 3 weeks, rack to secondary or keg and dry hop , or
2/   After fermentation is verified done, cold crash the yeast ~ 32F for a few days, then rack to secondary or keg and dry hop.
Either way, you've effectively separated your beer from a lot of yeast. I've done this with 1056, not a terribly flocculent strain, many,many times.

--- End quote ---
Do you think there are any issues with bottle conditioning with either of these approaches?

HoosierBrew:
Not at all. There is always yeast in beer, but below a certain threshold it just doesn't appear as cloudy. More than enough in any beer to carb your bottles though. Good luck !

duboman:
IME with competitions, you're more apt to get dinged for not enough flavor/aroma than clarity if the style calls for hop presence

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