Author Topic: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?  (Read 1211 times)

Online Jimmy K

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2014, 09:17:37 AM »


Oh sure...now they have them.  Do you know how many times I've passed out after a night of drinking waiting for my Ramen noodles to cook?

LMAO.  Yeah, shaving the 3 minute cooking time down to a minute and a half makes all the difference to me. I wonder if it makes them taste any better.
Soo... according to their website http://rapidramen.com/ it takes three minutes. Maybe it's because 1 is half of 1/2 and they're dividing by half of half - so dividing by 1? Right?
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Offline mattybrass

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #16 on: August 11, 2014, 11:19:08 AM »


Oh sure...now they have them.  Do you know how many times I've passed out after a night of drinking waiting for my Ramen noodles to cook?

LMAO.  Yeah, shaving the 3 minute cooking time down to a minute and a half makes all the difference to me. I wonder if it makes them taste any better.

Id wager you dont get as much of that "cooked ramen" taste that can happen with a lot of noodles in a long boil. thats why a lot of the craft ramen places are moving towards adding most of the noodles towards the end of the boil, this limits the chance of that happening.

Offline S. cerevisiae

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2014, 06:31:26 PM »
From spike brewing regarding why they do not sell clad kettles.
<snip>

While I am not a huge fan of the guy who runs Spike Brewing, he does have a point.   The 27-quart Vollrath stock pot from which I built my 3.5-gallon batch size kettle has a tri-ply, induction-ready bottom.  I also own American-made Polar Ware 321BP (8 gallon) 361BP (10 gallon) factory manufactured brewing kettles that only have single-ply bottoms. The Polar Ware kettles are more efficient kettles when it comes to heating wort.  In fact, they are significantly more efficient when it comes to heating wort.
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Offline dcbc

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2014, 08:40:21 PM »
From the FAQ in the Boilermaker section of Blichmann's site:


Do I need a clad bottom?

Clad bottoms are great for cooking viscous foods like spaghetti or gravies, especially on an electric stove. Because these foods don't convect like thinner liquids (such as beer wort), scorching is more likely. With the full rolling boil of a wort boil, and the use of a gas/propane burner, scorching is not an issue, even on the lightest worts. Our research and development team has thoroughly tested the BoilerMaker™ pots on high-BTU burners with very light beers (Koelsch, Pils, etc.) and experienced no discoloration or scorching whatsoever. While the clad bottoms look impressive, they add cost, but no real benefit, to the brewer. Because we designed the BoilerMaker™ from a clean sheet, we added cost only where it added specific benefits to the brewer. The stepped bottom, quality level gauge, adjustable BrewMometer™, and snap-in dip tube are a few examples.


I use 3 of the Morebeer type kettles (from various sources), each with the triclad bottoms.  All work great and I have not scorching.  As for the cost, they are less than the comparable boilermakers despite having the more robust bottom sections.  I direct fire my MLT with a Blichmann Tower of Power.  So it's extra insurance there as far as I'm concerned.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 08:42:44 PM by dcbc »
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Offline mugwort

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2014, 10:31:40 AM »
I use 3 of the Morebeer type kettles (from various sources), each with the triclad bottoms.  All work great and I have not scorching.  As for the cost, they are less than the comparable boilermakers despite having the more robust bottom sections.  I direct fire my MLT with a Blichmann Tower of Power.  So it's extra insurance there as far as I'm concerned.

Thanks for the post.  Yeah, I've never had a problem with wort boils, but using the Blichmann as a direct-fire mash tun can be a whole different story.  Flame restraint is crucial.

I love those heavy duty MoreBeer pots as well.  Armored vehicles of the brewing vessel world.
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Online Jimmy K

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Re: Why are boilermaker kettle bottoms so dang thin?
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2014, 06:46:16 AM »
I use 3 of the Morebeer type kettles (from various sources), each with the triclad bottoms.  All work great and I have not scorching.  As for the cost, they are less than the comparable boilermakers despite having the more robust bottom sections.  I direct fire my MLT with a Blichmann Tower of Power.  So it's extra insurance there as far as I'm concerned.

Thanks for the post.  Yeah, I've never had a problem with wort boils, but using the Blichmann as a direct-fire mash tun can be a whole different story.  Flame restraint is crucial.

I love those heavy duty MoreBeer pots as well.  Armored vehicles of the brewing vessel world.
I imagine with liquid trapped under a false bottom (assuming you have the false bottom) that you'd have to be careful even with a clad bottom. It's just a very small amount of liquid trapped over a high heat source.
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