Author Topic: Hop Aroma In The Final Product  (Read 1541 times)

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2014, 02:11:06 PM »
I routinely brew IPA's and IIPA's with between 12 ad 16 oz of hops to 6 gallons.  I mostly do a large dry hop at 5 days but sometimes do a 7 and 3 day dry hop, splitting the amounts in half and the aroma is killer.  Sadly, it doesn't last very long so drink up.

+1.  I use a lb in an AIPA pretty regularly.

OP -   For reference, 2 -2.5 oz dry hops (5 gallons) is fairly common for APA-level hop character. I use 5 -6+ oz dry hops for AIPA, 7 days.  8- 12 oz dry hops for IIPA, half each in separate 5 day hopping additions.

As for hop stands/whirlpool/steeping, you have to decide what you want to accomplish. If you're looking to pick up some bitterness as well as some hop flavor and aroma, adding the hops from flameout down to 185F will accomplish that. I prefer to get basically all of my bitterness from the boil addition, so I like to cool to 170F before adding the hops. You get very little to no noticeable bitterness at this temp, and additionally less of the volatile oils are driven off as compared to adding at flameout, leaving better flavor and aroma IMO. Good luck !
Jon H.

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2014, 08:52:10 PM »
I agree with the other about increasing the dry hops. I tend to use upwards of six ounces over two phase for up to six days on most of my big IPAs or showcase hop-blasted APA. Also, I'll echo the advice of increasing the flameout hop additions. I tend to use at least 30% of my hops at flameout for a hop steep.

Offline gevans73

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2014, 05:57:07 AM »
I've found that no matter the dry hop amounts, the aroma always fads too fast.  I've gone to late additions, steep and whirlpool, then use a hop rocket to keg or bottle with.  Makes a huge difference.  If you really want a lot of aroma, connect your hop rocket or randle to your serving tap.

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2014, 08:24:28 AM »
If the hop aroma fades fast, make sure you minimize air exposure during racking and packaging. O2 will oxidize those aromas quickly.
Jeff Rankert
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2014, 08:25:43 AM »
If the hop aroma fades fast, make sure you minimize air exposure during racking and packaging. O2 will oxidize those aromas quickly.

+1
Jon H.

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2014, 11:44:58 AM »
Manage your expectations, because that is a ton of hops.

+1

That's more hops than I use in three batches.

When it comes to hop aroma, the oil content and quality matters more than the weight of the hops.   One of the things that I used to like about Mark Garetz's hops is that each package carried an oil rating that made achieving consistent aroma profiles much easier.


Offline mattybrass

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2014, 11:47:04 AM »
i've heard of lots of people using 6-8 oz of dry hops in IIPAs

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2014, 07:05:27 AM »
i've heard of lots of people using 6-8 oz of dry hops in IIPAs

 +1. 8-12 oz for me. While it would be overkill and not to style in a British IPA, it works very nicely in IIPA.
Jon H.

Offline fmader

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2014, 10:45:52 AM »
I found recipe for my last ipa here. It has 2oz FWH, 2oz at 60, 4oz at 10,&0 as well as 4 oz dry hop. I can smell the beer from across the room. Columbus for 60, each other addition was equal parts Amarillo, Citra, centennial, and simcoe. Loving every sip and smell!

+1.... This is my general hop schedule with an IPA. I almost always use Columbus at 60 in an IPA. The other 3-4 hop breeds will vary, but I usually use equal parts of each at FWH, 10, 0, and Dry hop.

Actually... This is exactly what I do. Did somebody actually take advice from me?!?!  :P
« Last Edit: August 23, 2014, 11:24:09 AM by fmader »
Frank

Offline 69franx

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2014, 11:06:40 AM »
Actually Frank, I (frank as well,) did take your advice. I absolutely love this schedule. Unfortunately I am going to run out before the next batch is ready. I ran it at 1.060 and can say it is a recipe I will make over and over now! Thanks and sorry I did not quote you, just could not remember who had posted it


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Frank Laske
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Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2014, 11:08:33 AM »
+1 to that schedule and varieties. Damn good stuff !  I've done something similar many times.
Jon H.

Offline fmader

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2014, 11:22:25 AM »
Actually Frank, I (frank as well,) did take your advice. I absolutely love this schedule. Unfortunately I am going to run out before the next batch is ready. I ran it at 1.060 and can say it is a recipe I will make over and over now! Thanks and sorry I did not quote you, just could not remember who had posted it


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No need to apologize at all. I just had to take a double take of it haha. I agree. I find 1.060-1.070 a solid range for this schedule. I tend to narrow it down to about 1.065-1.067. I've also used this schedule for APA's as well. Instead of using a pound, I cut the hops down to about half (8 oz). Then I sub C40 (I use 5% C40 and 5% munich in my IPA's) with C60 for the APA's. Then of course shoot for a lower gravity.... say 1.058ish.
Frank

Offline 69franx

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Re: Hop Aroma In The Final Product
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2014, 02:36:47 PM »
Just punched all that into beersmith and will have to give it a try


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Frank Laske
Franx Brew Workz
Fermenting:
Conditioning:  You're my Hero Hazelnut Double Brown, Evil Twin, Cherrywood Smoked Porter, Sour Saison on raspberries and something WILD
In Bottles: House IPA, The Queen's Diamonds EBW
In the works: Ballantine Style IPA, Lots of ideas involving impending delivery of WLP 835 Lager X this month