Author Topic: Safbrew Abbaye Ale  (Read 25512 times)

Offline JT

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2015, 10:35:59 AM »
I've a Honey Brown in primary since last weekend. Pitched with Safbrew/Fermentis Abbaye and held at 24°C (75°F) for 5 days now. Upper end of what Fermentis recommends for this yeast but I picked up from other people's experiences that it doesn't produce much phenolic character so I decided to ferment warm.

Took a grav sample yesterday: from 1050 tot 1008, meaning apparent attenuation of 82% and climbing.

Smelled horrible. I got a faint whiff of the honey (2 lbs in a 5 gal batch), which got swamped by a dreadful sulphury stink. Worse: the sulphur's in the taste as well.
I've no idea what's causing the stink, but I'm suspecting the yeast. Maybe it'll clear up in time but I've got a bad bad feeling about this one...
If the sulphur smell is a byproduct of the yeast it will fade out during storage.  Your description of dreadful sulphur stink though makes me think infection.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2015, 02:32:22 PM by JT »

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2015, 11:50:51 AM »
What kind of infection would leave a sulphur smell, I wonder?
All truth is fiction.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #47 on: February 06, 2015, 02:12:15 PM »
Sulfur is very normal.  Give it a month, and the sulfur will probably be gone.
Dave

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Offline JT

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2015, 02:36:14 PM »
What kind of infection would leave a sulphur smell, I wonder?
Personally, never experienced it with an infection, just referencing How to Brew there.  I agree with Dave, I would hang on to any beer with a sulfur problem because IME it doesn't stay with the final product. 

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2015, 03:22:29 PM »
What kind of infection would leave a sulphur smell, I wonder?
Personally, never experienced it with an infection, just referencing How to Brew there.  I agree with Dave, I would hang on to any beer with a sulfur problem because IME it doesn't stay with the final product.

+3

A couple of weeks of cold lagering should take care of it.
Frank C.

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heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #50 on: February 06, 2015, 09:25:22 PM »
Yeah. I realise the beer is still extremely green (5 days in primary) but it's the first time I've encountered such an off-putting initial stage in brewing. I swear, my pukey gose was more appealing than this.

Hanging on to it. Time will tell.
All truth is fiction.
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Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #51 on: February 08, 2015, 02:26:56 PM »
Please update and let us know how it turns out.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2015, 09:57:43 AM »
Please update and let us know how it turns out.

Will do :)

Whatever I've to say about the yeast, it sure is a chomper. For 12 days now it's been slowly eating away at the brew, with the airlock still showing activity at a steady 77°F. The air inside my fermentation-fridge doesn't smell bad at all, quite banana-ish actually. My estimate is to rack sometime next week, after slowly bringing her down to 40°F so the yeast can flocc. I've a suspicion part of the sulphur flavour comes from the yeast itself.
All truth is fiction.
--Don Quichote

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #53 on: February 13, 2015, 02:06:23 AM »
Please update and let us know how it turns out.

Will do :)

Whatever I've to say about the yeast, it sure is a chomper. For 12 days now it's been slowly eating away at the brew, with the airlock still showing activity at a steady 77°F. The air inside my fermentation-fridge doesn't smell bad at all, quite banana-ish actually. My estimate is to rack sometime next week, after slowly bringing her down to 40°F so the yeast can flocc. I've a suspicion part of the sulphur flavour comes from the yeast itself.

Thanks. When did it turn the corner? Mine still stinks, and it has been almost two weeks in primary.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2015, 05:54:33 AM »
FWIW, stinky brew usually fades with time.  I have used this yeast with good results.  It is a bit different than an other yeast I have used.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #55 on: February 13, 2015, 09:40:57 AM »
When did it turn the corner? Mine still stinks, and it has been almost two weeks in primary.

It hasn't. Yet. I think.
It never smelled bad in the fermentor-fridge. Just the sample itself. The CO2 it's burping out doesn't seem to smell off.
All truth is fiction.
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Offline stevecrawshaw

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #56 on: February 16, 2015, 09:57:49 AM »
I brewed an american barley wine with this yeast a couple of months ago and sampled it last night. It has come out well, with no dominant phenolic or belgian esters, but a good US hop character. It has fully attenuated and is crystal clear. I can confirm that it is a good attenuator and tolerant of high alcohol levels (10%).
I like to keep a bottle of stimulant handy in case I see a snake, which I also keep handy.

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2015, 02:28:30 AM »
I brewed an american barley wine with this yeast a couple of months ago and sampled it last night. It has come out well, with no dominant phenolic or belgian esters, but a good US hop character. It has fully attenuated and is crystal clear. I can confirm that it is a good attenuator and tolerant of high alcohol levels (10%).

That's encouraging news. Thanks!
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #58 on: February 18, 2015, 09:01:46 PM »
Reporting for duty.

18 days later, things have much improved. Primary's been nearing completion, and since 4 days, I've been slowly bringing her down from 75 F to 40 with 5 degree decrements.
Beer dropped bright clear now, and the sulphur's gone. In its place came honey notes, as well as toasty biscuity flavours. The honey hints of sweetness which is actually not really there (1.050 to 1.006) and the 25-ish IBUs give a nice complementary bitterness. El Dorado turned slightly marzipany-almondy.

Goes to show you can't hurry beer, and a beer one week into primary is nothing like its eventual mature form.

Now: secondary for a couple weeks and then, into the bottle. Bee keeper's getting restless for her beers.

All truth is fiction.
--Don Quichote

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Safbrew Abbaye Ale
« Reply #59 on: February 22, 2015, 02:33:17 PM »
Reporting for duty.

18 days later, things have much improved. Primary's been nearing completion, and since 4 days, I've been slowly bringing her down from 75 F to 40 with 5 degree decrements.
Beer dropped bright clear now, and the sulphur's gone. In its place came honey notes, as well as toasty biscuity flavours. The honey hints of sweetness which is actually not really there (1.050 to 1.006) and the 25-ish IBUs give a nice complementary bitterness. El Dorado turned slightly marzipany-almondy.

Goes to show you can't hurry beer, and a beer one week into primary is nothing like its eventual mature form.

Now: secondary for a couple weeks and then, into the bottle. Bee keeper's getting restless for her beers.



Thanks for the update. Mine is coming along as well. I kegged yesterday, and the sulphur was almost gone. I figure another week or two in the keg at 34F. will do it. As it was it tasted good. Smooth pilsner with a touch of honey. The yeast has just a faint Belgian peppery character.Pretty much just what I was shooting for.

More to come at tapping time.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'