Author Topic: Fermenting cooler than specified  (Read 2302 times)

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6306
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2010, 08:21:50 AM »
I am bottling my IIPA this afternoon, I had wanted to harvest some of the yeast. I really like the way that the S-05 behaved.
Once I harvest into a sterile container, should I leave a quantity of sterile water on the yeast cake in the fridge for storage?
Gcam

I wouldn't recommend harvesting yeast from much higher OG than 1.065.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline richardt

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1227
    • View Profile
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2010, 08:38:11 AM »
I wouldn't recommend harvesting yeast from much higher OG than 1.065.

Why not? 
Wouldn't pitching it into a starter help "rejuvenate" the yeast before it actually makes it into the next batch of wort?
I've read that high gravity worts result in high ABV beers and that high alcohol and CO2 levels are detrimental to yeast.
Is there a study or article or link that discusses this in better detail that you can point me to?

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6306
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2010, 08:44:05 AM »
Perhaps if you made a starter before it would be alright - I'm speaking pitching slurry. But yeast is stressed after a high gravity fermentation and tends to not be as healthy. I have used it at around 1.075 or so and it has definitely seemed more sluggish. 1.065-1.070 is usually the highest I will go. As far as an article or study, there are plenty out there. Its pretty much industry standard not to reuse yeast much higher than 1.065 - though some Belgian brewers do.

And, another thing to consider is collecting yeast from a very hoppy beer can cause problems as well. Hop resins can coat yeast cells and cause problems in budding. Personally I would never reuse yeast from a IIPA.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2010, 08:45:41 AM by majorvices »
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline gcam333

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2010, 08:50:33 AM »
Thanks Major,
I will try harvesting from another batch later on.
Gcam

Offline bellebouche

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
    • Blog
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2010, 02:35:02 AM »
I pitched a starter of Safale S05 into a 1066 Scottish 80/- recipe at 59f and it as stayed fairly constantly within a 57f-61f range for twelve days where the beer has now settled down to 1012.

I mashed fairly high so I'm not expecting it to fall a great deal further but the recipe calls for a one month fermentation so I'll be leaving it alone. I guess the extra couple of weeks sat on the yeast cake might help clear up any DMS in the beer?

Irrespective, first time I've used this strain and I have to say I've been impressed with the ability to ferment well at such low temperatures.


Offline dean

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 922
  • Me and Hayden, my newest grandson.
    • View Profile
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2010, 08:19:49 AM »
I pitched a starter of Safale S05 into a 1066 Scottish 80/- recipe at 59f and it as stayed fairly constantly within a 57f-61f range for twelve days where the beer has now settled down to 1012.

I mashed fairly high so I'm not expecting it to fall a great deal further but the recipe calls for a one month fermentation so I'll be leaving it alone. I guess the extra couple of weeks sat on the yeast cake might help clear up any DMS in the beer?

Irrespective, first time I've used this strain and I have to say I've been impressed with the ability to ferment well at such low temperatures.



I've had US05 ferment at 55 degrees WORT temperture, its slower but clean with a little more malt flavor perhaps.  Did this more than once, big beers too, just pitch the appropriate amount.  I never rehydrate dry yeast either, just sprinkle it on dry.  I think I tried rehydrating it once but there wasn't any noticeable difference.

Offline bellebouche

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
    • Blog
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2010, 02:23:47 PM »
The datasheet from Fermentis on this yeast says it's fine to sprinkle it on dry if the wort is warm enough but I always like to ease things along by rehydrating and then feeding on a starter culture - irrespective of the yeast and temperature

http://www.fermentis.com/FO/pdf/HB/EN/Safale_US-05_HB.pdf


Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6306
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2010, 03:35:55 PM »
I brew 10 gallon batches and side by side I haven't really ever noticed any difference between hydrating and not hydrating as far as the quality of the beer is concerned.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline brewmichigan

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 454
    • View Profile
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2010, 08:03:55 AM »
To reply to the OP about pitching and fermenting US-05 on the cool end, I do it all the time. I usually pitch the US-05 lower than 60, in the 57-59 range, and let the temp of fermentation take it up to 61-62. I get amazingly clean beers this way that allow the hops to shine through. I have done this with other yeasts as well. I have done this with wyeast 1450, and 1056. So far the US-05 works the best. I noticed Denny's yeast seemed to slow down a lot under 60. Once I ramped the temp back up into the lower 60s it took right back off.

I have also never had a problem with attenuation because I pitched too low. Good luck and keep pitching low!
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Online Kaiser

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1797
  • Imperial Brewing Geek
    • View Profile
    • braukaiser.com
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2010, 08:34:45 AM »
I have also never had a problem with attenuation because I pitched too low. Good luck and keep pitching low!

A good idea, especially when pitching on the low end of the temperature range, is the Fast Ferment Test. This test shows you how far the yeast can go and tells you if the yeast in your colder beer fermentation is done or just gave up and may require warming up the beer.

Kai

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8678
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2010, 09:43:06 AM »
I have also never had a problem with attenuation because I pitched too low. Good luck and keep pitching low!

A good idea, especially when pitching on the low end of the temperature range, is the Fast Ferment Test. This test shows you how far the yeast can go and tells you if the yeast in your colder beer fermentation is done or just gave up and may require warming up the beer.

Kai

Do you know if any commercial breweries use this method of QC?
Ron Price

Online Kaiser

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1797
  • Imperial Brewing Geek
    • View Profile
    • braukaiser.com
Re: Fermenting cooler than specified
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2010, 12:31:20 PM »
Do you know if any commercial breweries use this method of QC?

All large breweries in Germany do this and I would also expect smaller ones to use it. I have also seen it used in the AB lab when I toured one of their plants. It's such an easy QC check that I would expect many commercial brewers to use it.

Kai