Author Topic: mash temp for porter  (Read 4546 times)

Offline goschman

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mash temp for porter
« on: September 17, 2014, 06:26:55 PM »
I plan for less attenuation when doing darker beers but I usually get less than I want. Is it necessary to mash above 154 for a porter if it is naturally less fermentable? I am thinking about mashing lower to find a compromise.

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Offline Jimmy K

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2014, 06:38:49 PM »
I feel like the answer is in your question. If you want more attenuation then by all mean mash lower.

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Offline goschman

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2014, 06:41:47 PM »
Haha yeah I tend to do that. I don't brew many dark beers. Am I correct in that it will be naturally less fermentable from the dark/roasted malts correct?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2014, 06:46:12 PM »
+1.  If you really like that grist, then take good notes and keep trying until you hit that magic mash temp.
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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2014, 06:49:15 PM »
yes, I find darker malts to provide more unfermentables. I'm always surprised by how low my AA% can get with lots of roast in the grist. my session stout is 1.040ish to 1.015ish with irish ale or dry english.
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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2014, 06:52:07 PM »
yes, I find darker malts to provide more unfermentables. I'm always surprised by how low my AA% can get with lots of roast in the grist. my session stout is 1.040ish to 1.015ish with irish ale or dry english.

+1.  Plus, most porters or stouts (non-Irish) have a decent amount of crystal as well.
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Offline goschman

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2014, 06:55:12 PM »
Okay thanks guys. Most of my beers are highly attenuated and finish under 1.010. I obviously don't want that for a porter but also don't want under 70% apparent attenuation.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2014, 08:31:14 PM »
I have not noticed any attenuation problems from dark roasted malts.  Attenuation is more dependent on the mash temperature and time, and the yeast strain used.  Often times, a porter or stout will specify use of English or Irish strains of yeast.  These typically are poor attenuators.  So, consider whether the yeast is more your "problem" than anything else.

Also consider that some folks like me mash ALL their beers low at 148-151 F.  It's just what I like best, and might be what you like too.
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Offline goschman

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2014, 08:42:37 PM »
Thanks.

For the most part, I mash between 148 and 152. Seems like I should go with the norm and see what I get. I will be using S04 for this batch which seems to get me about 80% apparent attenuation with my current practices.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2014, 09:16:33 PM »
I went through the phase where I wanted lower attenuation and I finally came to the conclusion that it was not the way to great beer. If I want a sweeter beer, I reduce the bittering. If I want fuller body, I include unmalted wheat, rye, or barley (typically flaked). Chasing low attenuation just doesn't seem to be a good method.

In addition, I know that most commercial brewers pursue higher attenuation and they alter those other aspects of the recipe (like I mention above) to achieve the flavor and balance they want. In addition, this method is a win-win for the brewer since it improves drinkability while producing similar flavor and reduces the amount of grain and hops in the recipe.

(I forgot to add changing the yeast strain to the list of variables for balance) ;-)
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 10:08:25 PM by mabrungard »
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2014, 09:50:10 PM »
I went through the phase where I wanted lower attenuation and I finally came to the conclusion that it was not the way to great beer. If I want a sweeter beer, I reduce the bittering. If I want fuller body, I include unmalted wheat, rye, or barley (typically flaked). Chasing low attenuation just doesn't seem to be a good method.

In addition, I know that most commercial brewers pursue higher attenuation and they alter those other aspects of the recipe (like I mention above) to achieve the flavor and balance they want. In addition, this method is a win-win for the brewer since it improves drinkability while producing similar flavor and reduces the amount of grain and hops in the recipe.

+1 to all of this.
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mash temp for porter
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2014, 11:04:34 PM »
I mashed the Porter that's now in my primary at 152*F. Of course, I do it cause I was told to. Not because of the great reasoning above. LOL
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Offline erockrph

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2014, 01:34:35 AM »
How's your water? Roasted grains can lower your mash pH. I'm wondering if it's getting low enough to affect conversion for you.
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Offline goschman

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2014, 02:41:17 AM »
How's your water? Roasted grains can lower your mash pH. I'm wondering if it's getting low enough to affect conversion for you.

I have no idea...haha. I got a water report but it doesn't seem to list what brewers expect. I can tell you that my efficiency is below average but I haven't been able to figure out why. I suspect it could be water or mash ph since the other usual suspects I think I have addressed adequately. As I mentioned I don't do many dark beers but the last one I did seemed to be right around my average efficiency. With as many batches as I have brewed and all the experience I have gained I am still novice although the quality of my beers has increased.

Water is definitely something that needs to be addressed.
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Offline tress

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Re: mash temp for porter
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2014, 09:23:37 AM »
I find that when I brew my robust porter, my efficiency is actually slightly higher than my average.  I don't do water adjustments (I've tried PH 5.2 Stabilizer but it doesn't work with my N. Illinois water) and I've just started using a smidgen of freshly ground coffee beans to my mash which has a pH of less than 5.  The coffee may be the reason why I get a better efficiency with my porter.
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