Author Topic: Dry yeast for English styles  (Read 10555 times)

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #45 on: February 11, 2016, 06:08:05 PM »
I ended up using some Muntons Gold yeast that I have been wanting to try. I brewed a Premium/Best Bitter and pitched 2 6g packets of rehydrated yeast at 65* and I oxygenated only slightly. It fermented 65-66*. It started showing some activity within hours of pitching and by morning was bubbling away. I seen full krausen at day two and by day 3 it was dropping. Day for the krausen was all but gone and only a bubbles were on top of the beer while I can see it was still doing it's thing. I bumped the temps to 68* after 4 days and it's finishing up and I can see the beer is actually clearing. I'm going to dry hop it soon and see how well it clears, then cold crash just before kegging.

I'm interested in trying the final beer since a few have mentioned it's actually a good English yeast. Another reason I'm so glad to have found this place. Just more and more bits of good info going around. So far it seems to be a good performer...just have to see what it did for the beer.

Offline chumley

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #46 on: February 12, 2016, 04:37:14 PM »
Check the gravity before you cold crash, Porterhous.  I found that Munton's Gold is similar to Fuller's as it tends to drop fast, and you may need to rouse it a couple of times to get to your target FG.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #47 on: February 12, 2016, 09:10:26 PM »
Just remember that calcium content of the water directly influences how quickly yeast flocculate. High calcium content causes faster and more complete clearing of beer. That is a reason why Burton ales were noted for their clarity.

If your yeast flocs too fast, you may have too much calcium in your water. Remember, yeast get ALL the calcium that they need for their metabolism from the malt. The extra provided by the water is not really needed. Zero calcium water can be used to brew with, it just might take forever for the beer to clear!
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Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2016, 07:34:36 AM »
Thanks guys. Chumley it was your recomendations that got me to try the Muntons. Ill check the gravity before crashing. Its dry hopping now and when I added tthe hops yesterday there was still some activity or at least some co2 coming out of solution which I was glad to see for the dry hopping.

Martin my tested tap water has about 35ppm Ca. I didnt do any mineral additions this time around. I dont thi k the yeast is floccing prematurely, just maybe that it is naturally a strong floccing yeast. I bumped the temps and gave it a rousing at dry hopping so that should help it finish off.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #49 on: February 13, 2016, 05:13:43 PM »
Some people will cringe but I use regular Munton's in some beers. I split a batch of ordinary bitter between S-04 and Munton's. I liked the S-04 better at first, but the Munton's half as the beers got a couple of weeks on them.  I used it on an ESB that went from 1.050 to 1.009 and turned out pretty good.
And I made a pretty good coconut cider with it.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #50 on: February 14, 2016, 12:55:41 AM »
I liked the S-04 better at first, but the Munton's half as the beers got a couple of weeks on them. 

I also have noted that S-04 beers were pretty nice initially, but developed a sharp flavor with time. Since it was multiple beers, I'm guessing it was something to do with the yeast and not an infection...unless the yeast had a bit of an infection.
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Offline brewsumore

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #51 on: February 14, 2016, 02:11:41 AM »
Bumping an old thread  but a great one. I am primarily a dry yeast user. Its cheap, easy and works for me with the basic brews I brew. I never know exactly when I will be brewing and for the beers I brew I havent noticed any better rrsults for the same strains in liquid form. I do use liquid for certain styles but I mosy brew everyday beers. There are a lot of new yeasts out there. Does anyone have any experience with the Mangrove Jack yeasts? I used the M07 British Ale once but dont really remember it. I have used S-04 and that is a go to yeast for me like US-05 is as well. Has anyone used the Mangrove Burton Union? It is said to be great for English Bitters which is the batch im brewing next. Then there is the Muntons Gold...I have never considered Muntons yeast but after reading through this thread it looks like the Muntons Gold can be something to try. Especially if its anything similar to the Fullers strain.
I also tried Windsor once in a Mild but I cant remember much about that one either. Another new dry yeast I am curious about is the Mangrove Newcastle yeast said to be great for dark beers...I considered it for a Bitter but it might be too much for that style unless someone can say otherwise.

So anyone have anything else to add about any of these yeasts?

I've found them to be pretty long laggers. Aside from that, they results have been mixed based on strain.

British Ale: did not like, too neutral, vodka-like esters (fusels?), better yeasts are available for this profile
Burton Union: excellent and unique british yeast, nutty quality, moderately fruity, great yeast
Newcastle Dark: yeast character is mild but pleasing, VERY LOW attenuator (mash in the 140s for sure)
US West Coast: excellent alternative to chico, more character than chico but subtle, more tart/tangy, very good
Belgian Ale: expect saison character, similar to belle saison but a little more subtle, good

That's my experience so far. I have Workhorse in my fridge but have read poor reports on it so I'm saving it for a special day :D

Thanks for sharring. Im intersted in trying the Burton Union for an English Bitter. I asko didnt care for the M07...too nuetral and finished very dry. Didnt leave much there.

I recently brewed and am now drinking an English Brown Ale fermented with MGJ Burton Union.  It's the 2nd time I've used that yeast and I love it and have read other positive comments in past research.  I start in the low-mid 60's and ramp over a couple days to 68F and leave it there until done.

Very clean.  None of the twangy bready thang of US-04 (I quit using that yeast).  Fairly low - mid ester and fruitiness, very easy drinking but English character.  I have read on sites including Rebel Brewer that its the Thames Valley yeast.

And you can sprinkle it on, which I did with 1.5 packets (15 g) per 5.5 gal of wort at 1.056 and that worked great.  It is a bit of a slow starter, but my ferment completed in 6 - 7 days, and it floculated well, although a few mini-floaties left down by the yeast cake when racking.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2016, 02:13:38 AM by brewsumore »

Offline brewsumore

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #52 on: February 14, 2016, 02:15:08 AM »
I've heard that the other MGJ dry English yeast is not as good.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #53 on: February 14, 2016, 04:56:19 PM »
I liked the S-04 better at first, but the Munton's half as the beers got a couple of weeks on them. 

I also have noted that S-04 beers were pretty nice initially, but developed a sharp flavor with time. Since it was multiple beers, I'm guessing it was something to do with the yeast and not an infection...unless the yeast had a bit of an infection.

I still liked the S-04 half, but the Munton's half seemed to get better with a bit of time.
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Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #54 on: April 21, 2016, 02:00:45 AM »
Check the gravity before you cold crash, Porterhous.  I found that Munton's Gold is similar to Fuller's as it tends to drop fast, and you may need to rouse it a couple of times to get to your target FG.

I like the Bitter that I used the Muntons Gold in but it didn't clear for crap. I had to use gelatin to drop the yeast haze, even after a couple weeks in the keg. Is this something you have found with Munton's Gold?