Author Topic: Dry yeast for English styles  (Read 10601 times)

Offline chumley

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2014, 04:39:13 PM »
My favorite dry yeast for English styles, hands down, is Munton's Gold. It's the closest dry yeast to Fuller's yeast that I have ever used.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2014, 05:20:37 PM »
I forgot about Munton's.  I believe I've had pretty good experience with that one as well, although it's been many many years.
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Offline beersk

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2014, 05:21:05 PM »
My favorite dry yeast for English styles, hands down, is Munton's Gold. It's the closest dry yeast to Fuller's yeast that I have ever used.
Ya don't say?? I may have to try this sometime...

Offline erockrph

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2014, 05:45:49 PM »
My favorite dry yeast for English styles, hands down, is Munton's Gold. It's the closest dry yeast to Fuller's yeast that I have ever used.
You serious? I've never tried Munton's because I can't say I've ever heard anything good about it. If it's really that close to Fullers I'd definitely give it a shot. My biggest complaint about dry English strains is that the ones I want aren't available.
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Offline chumley

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2014, 05:59:40 PM »
Yes I am serious.  But be sure to get Munton's Gold, not Munton's.  Munton's is meh, has that bready thing going on like S-04.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #20 on: September 22, 2014, 06:32:13 PM »
When I think Munton's I think of the little foil packet that used to come with cans of extract back in the 90s, stamped with "ale yeast" or something like that.

But I know that we are worlds away from those days.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2014, 06:54:33 PM »
When I think Munton's I think of the little foil packet that used to come with cans of extract back in the 90s, stamped with "ale yeast" or something like that.

But I know that we are worlds away from those days.

+1.   My thoughts too. Things have come sooooo far since then.
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Offline brewsumore

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2014, 04:35:48 AM »
I just used Mangrove Jack's Burton Union Yeast for a premium bitter.  I've only tasted the hydro sample when racking to keg (it's carbing/conditioning), but among the "English" dry yeasts I'd say that it's as close as I've come to the quality of a specialty liquid yeast.

Per Rebel Brewer website:

Suitable for English ales. Ideal for Ordinary Bitter, Extra Special Bitter (ESB), Golden Ale and more.
Mangrove Jack’s Burton Union Yeast M79 is very similar to Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley or White Labs WLP023.

Mangrove Jack's also carries M07 dry yeast, English Ale Yeast, which I have not tried yet:

Per Rebel Brewer website:
Ideal for brewing India Pale Ale, ESB, Porter, Stouts, Barley Wine and more.
Mangrove Jack’s British Ale Yeast M07 is very similar to White Labs WLP007.

I don't care for either Nottingham or S-04.

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2014, 05:20:06 AM »
Mangrove Jack's also carries M07 dry yeast, English Ale Yeast, which I have not tried yet:

Per Rebel Brewer website:
Ideal for brewing India Pale Ale, ESB, Porter, Stouts, Barley Wine and more.
Mangrove Jack’s British Ale Yeast M07 is very similar to White Labs WLP007.

I don't care for either Nottingham or S-04.

S-04 is the same strain as WLP007 and Wyeast 1098; namely, Whitbread "B." 

Offline majorvices

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2014, 10:29:31 AM »
Mangrove Jack's also carries M07 dry yeast, English Ale Yeast, which I have not tried yet:

Per Rebel Brewer website:
Ideal for brewing India Pale Ale, ESB, Porter, Stouts, Barley Wine and more.
Mangrove Jack’s British Ale Yeast M07 is very similar to White Labs WLP007.

I don't care for either Nottingham or S-04.


S-04 is the same strain as WLP007 and Wyeast 1098; namely, Whitbread "B."

That's what I had always heard but the last time I tried it I thought that it had a good bit of diacetyl so I always stuck with liquid yeast. I love WLP007 - it's my favorite English strain.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2014, 11:57:15 AM »
S-04 is the same strain as WLP007 and Wyeast 1098; namely, Whitbread "B."
That's what I had always heard but the last time I tried it I thought that it had a good bit of diacetyl so I always stuck with liquid yeast. I love WLP007 - it's my favorite English strain.
I haven't gotten diacetyl, but I've gotten the "bready" thing that a lot of brewers say they get. I don't generally repitch dry yeast, but if it's the same strain as 007 & 1098, then I'm wondering whether it starts to act more like the liquid brands after a repitch or two. It seems like there's some quirk with the Fermentis version that doesn't give quite the same result as the liquid right out of the gate.
Eric B.

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Offline majorvices

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2014, 12:01:56 PM »
It's been 10 years or more since I have used it but I definitely got diacetyl. Might have been fermenting too cool.

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #27 on: December 09, 2015, 07:47:58 PM »
Bumping an old thread  but a great one. I am primarily a dry yeast user. Its cheap, easy and works for me with the basic brews I brew. I never know exactly when I will be brewing and for the beers I brew I havent noticed any better rrsults for the same strains in liquid form. I do use liquid for certain styles but I mosy brew everyday beers. There are a lot of new yeasts out there. Does anyone have any experience with the Mangrove Jack yeasts? I used the M07 British Ale once but dont really remember it. I have used S-04 and that is a go to yeast for me like US-05 is as well. Has anyone used the Mangrove Burton Union? It is said to be great for English Bitters which is the batch im brewing next. Then there is the Muntons Gold...I have never considered Muntons yeast but after reading through this thread it looks like the Muntons Gold can be something to try. Especially if its anything similar to the Fullers strain.
I also tried Windsor once in a Mild but I cant remember much about that one either. Another new dry yeast I am curious about is the Mangrove Newcastle yeast said to be great for dark beers...I considered it for a Bitter but it might be too much for that style unless someone can say otherwise.

So anyone have anything else to add about any of these yeasts?

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2015, 08:01:40 PM »
There's a whole thread on the Mangrove Jack yeasts.  I think the consensus was they weren't that great, but you'll have to read the thread.

Windsor is OK.  It tends to finish high.  I haven't used it recently, but I used it a fair amount in the past and liked it.  If you're going Windsor, mix it with Nottingham.  The mix makes both better.
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Offline stpug

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Re: Dry yeast for English styles
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2015, 08:13:36 PM »
Bumping an old thread  but a great one. I am primarily a dry yeast user. Its cheap, easy and works for me with the basic brews I brew. I never know exactly when I will be brewing and for the beers I brew I havent noticed any better rrsults for the same strains in liquid form. I do use liquid for certain styles but I mosy brew everyday beers. There are a lot of new yeasts out there. Does anyone have any experience with the Mangrove Jack yeasts? I used the M07 British Ale once but dont really remember it. I have used S-04 and that is a go to yeast for me like US-05 is as well. Has anyone used the Mangrove Burton Union? It is said to be great for English Bitters which is the batch im brewing next. Then there is the Muntons Gold...I have never considered Muntons yeast but after reading through this thread it looks like the Muntons Gold can be something to try. Especially if its anything similar to the Fullers strain.
I also tried Windsor once in a Mild but I cant remember much about that one either. Another new dry yeast I am curious about is the Mangrove Newcastle yeast said to be great for dark beers...I considered it for a Bitter but it might be too much for that style unless someone can say otherwise.

So anyone have anything else to add about any of these yeasts?

I've found them to be pretty long laggers. Aside from that, they results have been mixed based on strain.

British Ale: did not like, too neutral, vodka-like esters (fusels?), better yeasts are available for this profile
Burton Union: excellent and unique british yeast, nutty quality, moderately fruity, great yeast
Newcastle Dark: yeast character is mild but pleasing, VERY LOW attenuator (mash in the 140s for sure)
US West Coast: excellent alternative to chico, more character than chico but subtle, more tart/tangy, very good
Belgian Ale: expect saison character, similar to belle saison but a little more subtle, good

That's my experience so far. I have Workhorse in my fridge but have read poor reports on it so I'm saving it for a special day :D