Poll

Which type of yeast do you prefer for an American IPA?

One that produces Fruity Esters
8 (30.8%)
One that is Clean & Crisp
18 (69.2%)

Total Members Voted: 24

Author Topic: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?  (Read 2343 times)

Offline a10t2

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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2014, 05:29:19 AM »
^ Preach it!
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Offline beersk

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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2014, 02:00:08 PM »
My personal favorite yeasts for APA are the fruitier American yeasts (1272, 1332) and the cleaner British yeasts (1028, WLP007) I think the subtle ester profile of those yeasts provide a nice backbone for the hops, along with a clean malt bill. Sometimes I think the super clean yeasts end up too clean without some light complexity under the hops.

+1. I'm just not a fan of hop teas.
Agreed. I think there does need to be some malt characteristics in there too.
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Offline The Professor

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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2014, 05:59:08 AM »
Siebel Bry 97 (a.k.a. Ballantine "Ale Brewery" Strain, Anchor, Wyeast 1272, White Labs WLP051, and Lallemand Bry 97) has become my favorite non-British/non-European ale strain.   Brewtek CL-50 (a.k.a. Wyeast 1450) is a very close second (it's probably the best strain for American red/amber ales on the planet).  Siebel Bry 96 (a.k.a. Ballantine "Beer Brewery" Strain, "Chico," Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, Fermentis Safale US-05, ...) has become my least favorite ale strain.

Agree about Bry 97...it's a great yeast and does  quite well in a wide variety of ale styles.  It's worth noting however that it's probably not entirely accurate to characterize it as a 'non British' strain.   While a number of American breweries have used it (and continue to use it)   it's origins actually do lead back to the UK;  Some research has suggested that it may have been brought over to the USA by Ballantine for all of their ales when the brewery re-booted after Prohibition.
(Ballantine's post-Prohibition  brewmaster was a Scotsman).
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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2014, 05:48:50 PM »
If we are talking origins than all yeast is likely Pangean...

If you look at the top APA's there are just as many using neutral yeast such as WLP001 as are using british like WLP002/WLP007.

I think both can be used to great effect in an American Pale Ale.  Like many homebrewers I started brewing beers with WLP001/US-05; now, after a few years, I've gravitated to WLP002 more and more.

Offline a10t2

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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2014, 07:25:00 PM »
If we are talking origins than all yeast is likely Pangean...

Yeast is actually quite new, by fungal standards. It evolved alongside the first flowering plants ~200 Mya.
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Re: AIPA yeast: Fruity Esters or Clean & Crisp?
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2014, 11:36:51 PM »
Siebel Bry 97 (a.k.a. Ballantine "Ale Brewery" Strain, Anchor, Wyeast 1272, White Labs WLP051, and Lallemand Bry 97) has become my favorite non-British/non-European ale strain.   Brewtek CL-50 (a.k.a. Wyeast 1450) is a very close second (it's probably the best strain for American red/amber ales on the planet).  Siebel Bry 96 (a.k.a. Ballantine "Beer Brewery" Strain, "Chico," Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, Fermentis Safale US-05, ...) has become my least favorite ale strain.

Agree about Bry 97...it's a great yeast and does  quite well in a wide variety of ale styles.  It's worth noting however that it's probably not entirely accurate to characterize it as a 'non British' strain.   While a number of American breweries have used it (and continue to use it)   it's origins actually do lead back to the UK;  Some research has suggested that it may have been brought over to the USA by Ballantine for all of their ales when the brewery re-booted after Prohibition.
(Ballantine's post-Prohibition  brewmaster was a Scotsman).

However, Siebel Bry 96 (a.k.a "Chico") is also of English extraction, which makes neither strain truly American.  Siebel Bry 96 and Siebel Bry 97 are both Ballantine strains.   These strains are also part of the USDA-ARS NRRL Collection.   

NRRL Y-7407 (Siebel Bry 96)
  Accession numbers in other collections: Lange 2
  Isolated from (substrate): BR, Beer pitching yeast
  Substrate location: Ballantine Brewery, New Jersey, USA
  Comments: ID from 26S renal partial sequences.
 
NRRL Y-7408 (Siebel Bry 97)
  Accession numbers in other collections: Lange 4
  Isolated from (substrate): BR, Ale pitching yeast
  Comments: ID from 26S rDNA partial sequences

With that said, an interesting factoid about Bry 96 is that it is a diploid yeast strain (2x16 chromosomes), which makes it fairly unique in the world of brewing yeast strains.  Most brewing strains are triploids (3x16 chromosomes) or tetraploids (4x16 chromosomes), usually with some level aneuploidy (a loss or an addition of chromosomes that makes the total number chromosomes not evenly divisible by 16).  I have another yeast strain in my bank that is a diploid S. cerevisiae strain.  It was used by the ACME Brewing Company in San Francisco to produce "beer."  As ACME did not close during prohibition, this yeast strain is more than likely a very old.  The culture was deposited in the UC Davis Culture Collection long before Liebmann acquired ACME as part of their expansion into the West Coast.