Author Topic: Homemade cheese  (Read 840 times)

Offline erockrph

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Homemade cheese
« on: October 05, 2014, 04:30:15 AM »
After several batches of mozzarella, I decided to branch out a bit in my home cheesemaking. I bought some chèvre culture a little while back. I didn't have a chance to get goat milk, but I wanted to make some cheese so I used cow's milk instead from my local dairy farm.

I must say, it was way easier than mozz and the results are great so far. I let the curds set for about 8 hours, then drained it overnight for about 8 more hours. At this point the cheese was softer than cream cheese, but firmer than ricotta. I split the batch in 4. One part got salted with truffle salt. I added honey and ginger to the next. I mixed sriracha in with the next (this one is the best of all). The last portion got salted and packed into a "mold" (a red solo cup with some holes poked in the bottom) and was left out to drain for another 10 hours or so while I went to work. I haven't tasted the last one yet, but it smells like some super tangy chèvre.

I'm going to the Pats game tomorrow night with some guys from work. I'm bringing a keg of O'fest and the three soft cheeses. Sometimes you just have to show off :)  I'll save the extra tangy cheese for cooking. Nothing beats roasted beets with chèvre and fig paste.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Stevie

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Re: Homemade cheese
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2014, 02:41:07 AM »
Looks like Brady showed up ready to play.

Offline pete b

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Re: Homemade cheese
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2014, 02:56:26 PM »
After several batches of mozzarella, I decided to branch out a bit in my home cheesemaking. I bought some chèvre culture a little while back. I didn't have a chance to get goat milk, but I wanted to make some cheese so I used cow's milk instead from my local dairy farm.

I must say, it was way easier than mozz and the results are great so far. I let the curds set for about 8 hours, then drained it overnight for about 8 more hours. At this point the cheese was softer than cream cheese, but firmer than ricotta. I split the batch in 4. One part got salted with truffle salt. I added honey and ginger to the next. I mixed sriracha in with the next (this one is the best of all). The last portion got salted and packed into a "mold" (a red solo cup with some holes poked in the bottom) and was left out to drain for another 10 hours or so while I went to work. I haven't tasted the last one yet, but it smells like some super tangy chèvre.

I'm going to the Pats game tomorrow night with some guys from work. I'm bringing a keg of O'fest and the three soft cheeses. Sometimes you just have to show off :)  I'll save the extra tangy cheese for cooking. Nothing beats roasted beets with chèvre and fig paste.
This is a good way to get invited back.
We have a friend who has been a cheese maker at a couple farms and we have exchanged brewing and mead making lessons for cheese making lessons a couple times. I make ricotta and paneer from local raw milk on a regular basis. Our friend taght us how to make halloumi and feta which use some more advanced techniques and is a bridge to the next step, aged cheeses. Aged, stinky, runny cheeses.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Homemade cheese
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2014, 04:53:49 PM »
This is a good way to get invited back.
We have a friend who has been a cheese maker at a couple farms and we have exchanged brewing and mead making lessons for cheese making lessons a couple times. I make ricotta and paneer from local raw milk on a regular basis. Our friend taght us how to make halloumi and feta which use some more advanced techniques and is a bridge to the next step, aged cheeses. Aged, stinky, runny cheeses.

I've made paneer a few times and I've made ricotta from the whey left over after making mozzarella. I've also screwed up a few batches of mozzarella. I'm not into the stinky, runny cheeses so much. What I'd like to get into eventually is stuff like gouda, cheddar and provolone.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline pete b

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Re: Homemade cheese
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2014, 05:14:13 PM »
This is a good way to get invited back.
We have a friend who has been a cheese maker at a couple farms and we have exchanged brewing and mead making lessons for cheese making lessons a couple times. I make ricotta and paneer from local raw milk on a regular basis. Our friend taght us how to make halloumi and feta which use some more advanced techniques and is a bridge to the next step, aged cheeses. Aged, stinky, runny cheeses.

I've made paneer a few times and I've made ricotta from the whey left over after making mozzarella. I've also screwed up a few batches of mozzarella. I'm not into the stinky, runny cheeses so much. What I'd like to get into eventually is stuff like gouda, cheddar and provolone.
IIRC those are some of the trickier ones to make, or at least among the longest to age. I would love to learn to make a really good cheddar. Although I like fancy cheeses of all kinds cheddar is my favorite cheese to just grab a hunk of and chow.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.