Author Topic: Batch Sparge Water  (Read 2513 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Batch Sparge Water
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2010, 02:30:46 PM »
One day I hope to be able to just fill and brew too! 

Denny, after the mash is complete and adding additional 1.375 Gal of water to compensate for absorbtion, what temperature should that water be heated to?

I generally go anywhere form 190 to boiling.  I also don't bother with that extra "pre mash runoff" addition as often as I used to. I've found that if that addition looks to be a gal. or less, there isn't much benefit gained by adding it.  Being lazy, I'd just as soon skip it if I can!
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Offline bbump22

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Re: Batch Sparge Water
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2010, 11:57:35 AM »
One day I hope to be able to just fill and brew too! 

Denny, after the mash is complete and adding additional 1.375 Gal of water to compensate for absorbtion, what temperature should that water be heated to?

I generally go anywhere form 190 to boiling.  I also don't bother with that extra "pre mash runoff" addition as often as I used to. I've found that if that addition looks to be a gal. or less, there isn't much benefit gained by adding it.  Being lazy, I'd just as soon skip it if I can!


When I read a mash directions such as this "Mash in at 145° F (63° C) and hold for 60 minutes.  Slowly raise the mash temperature to 169° F (76° C), then sparge with 173° F (78° C) water."  How would I slowly raise the mash temp to 169?  Also, what is considered "slowly"?  I also get confused when it says to sparge with 173 degree water...This means the grain bed should be raised to 173, right?  So I would adjust my sparge water appropriately then.
mmmm....beer

Offline denny

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Re: Batch Sparge Water
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2010, 12:00:18 PM »
When I read a mash directions such as this "Mash in at 145° F (63° C) and hold for 60 minutes.  Slowly raise the mash temperature to 169° F (76° C), then sparge with 173° F (78° C) water."  How would I slowly raise the mash temp to 169?  Also, what is considered "slowly"?  I also get confused when it says to sparge with 173 degree water...This means the grain bed should be raised to 173, right?  So I would adjust my sparge water appropriately then.

You don't go "slowly"...it just doesn't matter.  Really, it doesn't matter all that much of you even go to the 169 step.  Generally, your sparge water will need to be hotter than the final temp you're shooting for.  For instance, if I want to hit that 169 step, I need to use water from 190-boiling in order to raise the grain bed temp from the mash temp.  The lower your mash temp, the hotter the sprage water will need to be in order to hit the 169 temp.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline micsager

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Re: Batch Sparge Water
« Reply #18 on: April 29, 2010, 05:32:10 PM »
Cool, thanks!  I need to get my sparge calculation down better and get an accurate volume measurement.  I am tempted to buy a kettle with a sight glass just to be more certain of my volume. 

I'm with on that.  I'll just add one to my keg though.  If you can't accurately measure your water, you can't calculate efficiency.  I "guess" I'm between 60-70%.  But it's a total guess. 

Offline danetrain

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Re: Batch Sparge Water
« Reply #19 on: April 29, 2010, 07:18:37 PM »
To measure the volume on my brewpot I just used a wooden dowel which I marked with a pencil.  Nothing fancy but it gets the job done with reasonable accuracy and consistency. 
Also I'd recommend keeping track as best you can all your volume measurements for a while.  This will help you better understand how your system operates, which is really what it all comes down to.  Once you get used to things you'll find you have to think about it alot less to get the desired results.
Cheers