Author Topic: Airlock blow out  (Read 2503 times)

Offline Hickory

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Airlock blow out
« on: October 17, 2014, 11:37:01 PM »


Hey everyone new to the site and was looking for some advice. My airlock completely blew off of my carboy and there is junk everywhere. Anybody have suggestions on what I can do to save this beer or is it already too far gone?

Offline narcout

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2014, 11:47:25 PM »
I would clean off the gunk with some sanitized paper towels and attach a sanitized blow off tube.  When the krausen subsides enough, remove the blow off tube and re-attach a sanitized airlock.

Other than losing some yeast, you should be ok. 
It's too close to home
And it's too near the bone

Offline Stevie

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2014, 11:58:12 PM »
+1. Hard lesson, but you're fine.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2014, 12:02:06 AM »
Yep, all good.
Jon H.

Offline Hickory

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2014, 12:24:29 AM »
Phew that's a relieve. To be honest this is only my 3rd brew and it's never happened before. I'm not 100% clear what the airlock is for except to keep wondering bacteria out?

Offline pete b

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2014, 01:32:48 AM »
Phew that's a relieve. To be honest this is only my 3rd brew and it's never happened before. I'm not 100% clear what the airlock is for except to keep wondering bacteria out?
To let CO2 out but not let oxygen, bacteria, etc. in. If all that gas, liquid, and foam run out of space it will push the airlock and bung out though. When using a carboy you really need either a lot of headspace or put a tube running from the whole in the bung into a pail of sanitizing solution to take the pressure off for a couple days then replace the hose with a sanitized airlock. Even easier is a fermenting bucket that is 6.5 at least gallons for a five gallon batch. That gives more headspace. This has happened to most of us.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2014, 01:40:12 AM »
Phew that's a relieve. To be honest this is only my 3rd brew and it's never happened before. I'm not 100% clear what the airlock is for except to keep wondering bacteria out?
For active primary fermentation that's all it is for. A lot of times I'll just use foil loosely over my carboys and Better Bottles at the beginning of fermentation.

For extended aging, then an airlock serves the more important function of allowing CO2 to escape without letting oxygen in.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2014, 01:47:12 AM »
Some beers are more prone to blow off as well as certain yeasts.

Offline Hickory

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2014, 04:15:17 AM »

Some beers are more prone to blow off as well as certain yeasts.

This is supposed to be a clone of Rhar and Sons Winter Warmer, and the recipe called for two packs of S-04 yeast. This is the first time I've used this yeast or more than 1 pack.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2014, 04:21:26 AM »
Bigger dark beers tend to go crazy. I have brewed my imperial stout at 4.5 gallons for the extra head space.

Offline Henielma

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2014, 04:54:03 PM »
Nothing wrong with your beer only with your carpet.  ;)

Temperature control with active cooling during the fermentation peak reduces the change on such a mess. Also a bigger fermentation vessel will help you next time.
Automated mashing and fermentation is not so strange

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2014, 12:41:35 AM »
Some beers are more prone to blow off as well as certain yeasts.

Wyeast 1007 is a well-known volcanic fermenter.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2014, 12:57:27 AM »

Some beers are more prone to blow off as well as certain yeasts.

Wyeast 1007 is a well-known volcanic fermenter.

2565 and 3068 tend to go nuts on me as well.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2014, 01:08:32 AM »
Yep, and I'd add 3787 as an insane fermenter as well.
Jon H.

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Re: Airlock blow out
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2014, 02:57:14 AM »
Two packs may be overpitching a bit, depending on OG.  Next time use the blowoff tube and check on pitching rate using Mr Malty or similar yeast calculator.  You are probably fine, but keep those temperatures under control.  I love this time of year, because here in Northern IL I can put a heat wrap on my ales and ferment them right in the sweet spot.
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