Author Topic: Danstar Windsor  (Read 11308 times)

Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #45 on: April 18, 2016, 08:11:06 AM »
Coming back to my "fermenting a 1.120 OG Barley Wine with Windsor" question: would it be a better (or in fact at all realistic) idea to ferment with a blend of Windsor and Thames Valley? Or are neither of these at all suitable for a barley wine?
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #46 on: April 18, 2016, 11:47:53 AM »
I don't know yet if it's a good idea... but I'll know more in a few more days.  I've just pitched a 50/50 combination of Windsor and Nottingham into my barleywine that I brewed yesterday.  So we'll see what happens.  I hope the Windsor doesn't flocculate out anything else in its path.
Dave

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Offline pete b

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2016, 11:52:19 AM »
I don't know yet if it's a good idea... but I'll know more in a few more days.  I've just pitched a 50/50 combination of Windsor and Nottingham into my barleywine that I brewed yesterday.  So we'll see what happens.  I hope the Windsor doesn't flocculate out anything else in its path.
Dry or slurry from a previous batch?
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #48 on: April 18, 2016, 01:51:21 PM »
I don't know yet if it's a good idea... but I'll know more in a few more days.  I've just pitched a 50/50 combination of Windsor and Nottingham into my barleywine that I brewed yesterday.  So we'll see what happens.  I hope the Windsor doesn't flocculate out anything else in its path.
Dry or slurry from a previous batch?

2-gallon batch, OG=1.077, new dry yeast packs, half pack of Notty, half pack of Windsor, sprinkled on top literally 2 hours ago, no rehydration.  I'm sure it will take off like gangbusters within 24 hours.
Dave

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Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #49 on: April 19, 2016, 08:09:04 AM »
Curious as to how that works out, Dave!
All truth is fiction.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #50 on: April 19, 2016, 11:10:05 AM »
Huge krausen within 10 hours at 60 F.
Dave

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Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #51 on: April 21, 2016, 01:45:02 AM »
I have used Windsor only twice and it was loooooong ago. I used it back to back, on a Mild and then a Bitter. I do not really remember much about it other than I was not happy with either beer. I need to try Windsor again, I feel like I'm missing out since it seems to get a lot of good remarks here on the forum. Especially the mix of Notty and Windsor.

I think I need to formulate an English Ale and split that into a few 1 gal batches to test out a few yeasts I haven't worked with in a long time. I would try out Windsor again, Notty, and a Windsor and Notty mix.


Offline Onthebrew

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #52 on: September 29, 2016, 07:44:54 PM »
Hi guys first post here and thought I'd pick this thread up as came  across this forum on a search for Windsor yeast. Very informative. my fermentation seems to have stopped at 1020 which seems a common point. It's been 10 days now and the ale is still quite cloudy. Alcohol ok as it started at 1060.

I would be happy to let it sit there for a few weeks but I've dry hopped loose leaves 4 days ago and wouldn't want to leave them. This is my first all grain brew and one mistake was not topping up with enough water so fermenter is  only half full, as would the secondary fermenter be if I transferred to that. I would worry about oxegising.  How long do you guys think it will take for the Windsor yeast to drop?
« Last Edit: September 29, 2016, 07:46:58 PM by Onthebrew »

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #53 on: September 29, 2016, 08:12:31 PM »
Hi guys first post here and thought I'd pick this thread up as came  across this forum on a search for Windsor yeast. Very informative. my fermentation seems to have stopped at 1020 which seems a common point. It's been 10 days now and the ale is still quite cloudy. Alcohol ok as it started at 1060.

I would be happy to let it sit there for a few weeks but I've dry hopped loose leaves 4 days ago and wouldn't want to leave them. This is my first all grain brew and one mistake was not topping up with enough water so fermenter is  only half full, as would the secondary fermenter be if I transferred to that. I would worry about oxegising.  How long do you guys think it will take for the Windsor yeast to drop?

This is unusual for Windsor.  If I recall correctly, the Windsor yeast flocculates very fast within a day or two after fermentation is complete.

In any case, you can get the yeast out faster by adding gelatin.  My process for doing that: Microwave about 1/2 cup of water until it boils.  Then add 1/2 teaspoon unflavored gelatin and stir to dissolve.  Allow to cool for a few minutes then add to your fermenter and swirl the fermenter to mix it in.  About 24-48 hours later, your beer should be clear.

Hope this helps.  I still think it seems unusual for Windsor yeast not to settle out right away.  I wonder if your dry hops introduced contamination.  However the gelatin would help with that as well.
Dave

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Offline Onthebrew

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #54 on: September 29, 2016, 09:01:21 PM »
Cheers Dave. Gelatin is an option. Earlier n the thread a couple people did advise that Windsor needs a good couple of weeks to clear, so trying to work out how long to give it. Varied experiences with it it seems.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #55 on: September 30, 2016, 02:45:27 PM »
Clarity could also be affected by your mash and any unconverted starches.

My recollection is that my Windsor beers were typically pretty bright.

EDIT:  I tend to leave the beer in primary for about a month or so prior to packaging, so it may be that I just never noticed any prolonged time to clear.
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Offline zifferent

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Re: Danstar Windsor
« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2016, 04:29:41 PM »
I'm a really big fan of Windsor. So take this with a grain of salt, but two things I've found that Windsor likes are moderate temperatures and longish fermentation times to clean up and finish.

So I ferment in a room usually right around 70-75 F and give each beer, dependent on OG at least 3 weeks of fermentation time, before cold crashing. I usually find that it will attenuate between 75% and 80% which I find acceptable.

While I like and use US-05, I find that it flocculates too well, as in even before a bigger beer is finished. I've had to swirl some beers just to get them to finish fermenting. Maybe if I fermented at 60 F I'd have better results.