Author Topic: diacetyl in a lite american lager  (Read 2051 times)

Offline thirsty

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2014, 08:45:21 PM »
Well, I'm with Dave. I find that warmth and time really help get rid of any diacetyl I might have.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2014, 09:45:26 PM »
All I know is, with many of the lagers I have made, a few of which had diacetyl very early on, it was gone in 3 weeks in the bottles conditioning at cellar temps around 60-ish degrees.  The priming sugar no doubt wakes up the yeast again.  If kegging and lagering ice cold in the 30s, this might not work at all.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2014, 02:13:05 PM »
All I know is, with many of the lagers I have made, a few of which had diacetyl very early on, it was gone in 3 weeks in the bottles conditioning at cellar temps around 60-ish degrees.  The priming sugar no doubt wakes up the yeast again.  If kegging and lagering ice cold in the 30s, this might not work at all.

I wish it would have worked for me. I won't argue that it won't fade. But once a lager has had diacetyl I have never had it go away completely without the krausening method, and even that didn't always work.

Since I haven't bottle conditioned a lager in 10 years or so I don't have anything helpful to add to that.

I am extremely sensitive to diacetyl. Perhaps I am picking up what some others can't? If so, lucky you. ;)

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2014, 03:02:13 PM »
I don't mind a slight hint of diacetyl in some beer styles, as long as it is quite slight, but this is a matter of personal preference.  I know a lot of people HATE it with a passion, and that's their choice.  I'm about as sensitive to it as many good judges are (I'm Certified) so I don't think I'm missing it either, but of course there's always somebody else out there more sensitive and more picky than I am.  So yeah, it's possible I'm not perfect.  However I do try to be.
Dave

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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2014, 03:26:42 PM »
Yeah I'm in the hater camp. I've picked up taste of diacetyl in commercial brews, mostly lighter pills. It may be an intentional attribute but it's not my favorite.


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Offline erockrph

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2014, 04:00:18 PM »
Yeah I'm in the hater camp. I've picked up taste of diacetyl in commercial brews, mostly lighter pills. It may be an intentional attribute but it's not my favorite.

+1 - I'm super sensitive myself. I can't drink Red Hook at all any more. Their Pils tastes like drinking liquid movie theater popcorn to me.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #21 on: November 07, 2014, 02:57:03 AM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #22 on: November 07, 2014, 03:57:44 AM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.

A high % of the population is blind to diacetyl. That is due to genetics and you can't learn to taste diaceyl if you can't, it is like being color blind to some colors. My sensitivity is medium high to high. I have to use the slickness test for levels sensitive people call out Diacetyl! Sam Smiths beers, I get it. Ringwood breweries, I usually get it.

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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2014, 04:23:32 AM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.

A high % of the population is blind to diacetyl. That is due to genetics and you can't learn to taste diaceyl if you can't, it is like being color blind to some colors. My sensitivity is medium high to high. I have to use the slickness test for levels sensitive people call out Diacetyl! Sam Smiths beers, I get it. Ringwood breweries, I usually get it.



I heard of a few guys that either get it on the end of their nose, or as slickness or as a soapiness.  Hopefully I will fall in there somewhere as I had a lager recently that a couple guys said was not great and as it was a step up lager, to just get enough yeast to do a full batch to pitch into, I wasn't too worried, but I suspected diacetyl issues.  Nobody could give me a good descriptor for the flaw, so I don't know what the issue was for sure,but I suspect diacetyl. I tried my best to tell what they tasted, but at this point I guess I must admit my blind spot...
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2014, 04:41:50 AM »
I have almost no sensitivity to diacetyl but I am crazy sensitive to clove and similar spiciness.  I have 20 gallons of German lager made for a Christmas party that I will do a D rest on this weekend just for safety sake, but I won't be able to tell if it gets rid of it or just reduces it.  I was at a club meeting at a regional brewpub and an accomplished judge told me to try a beer to be able to taste what diacetyl is and I told him that I perceived a little slickness on the tongue, but no discernible taste issue.  He said I have much to learn, so I am signed up for his BJCP tasting class this winter.  Call me palate deprived, but willing to learn.

A high % of the population is blind to diacetyl. That is due to genetics and you can't learn to taste diaceyl if you can't, it is like being color blind to some colors. My sensitivity is medium high to high. I have to use the slickness test for levels sensitive people call out Diacetyl! Sam Smiths beers, I get it. Ringwood breweries, I usually get it.



I heard of a few guys that either get it on the end of their nose, or as slickness or as a soapiness.  Hopefully I will fall in there somewhere as I had a lager recently that a couple guys said was not great and as it was a step up lager, to just get enough yeast to do a full batch to pitch into, I wasn't too worried, but I suspected diacetyl issues.  Nobody could give me a good descriptor for the flaw, so I don't know what the issue was for sure,but I suspect diacetyl. I tried my best to tell what they tasted, but at this point I guess I must admit my blind spot...

I should I say the % is around 20. I judge fairly often with a National Lever that is blind to diacetyl. We make a great pair! Another National Level judge is hyper sensitive to diacetyl, but readily admits he is blind to DMS.

We all have our palates and have to live/adapt to them.

Good luck on the BJCP tasting class.

Jeff Rankert
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BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline brewinhard

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2014, 12:01:07 AM »
A high % of the population is blind to diacetyl. That is due to genetics and you can't learn to taste diaceyl if you can't, it is like being color blind to some colors. My sensitivity is medium high to high. I have to use the slickness test for levels sensitive people call out Diacetyl! Sam Smiths beers, I get it. Ringwood breweries, I usually get it.

And that is why I don't care for the Ringwood strain at all!

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: diacetyl in a lite american lager
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2014, 01:21:44 AM »
Not a Ringwood fan either.
Jon H.