Author Topic: What style is this recipe most like?  (Read 867 times)

Offline codymclelland

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What style is this recipe most like?
« on: November 09, 2014, 08:04:14 PM »
I'm trying to figure out exactly what style this recipe is most like. As far as I can figure, it's very close to a Winter Warmer that is influenced by a Russian Imperial Stout, with both styles being widely variable.

Estimates according to Brewer's Friend calculator:
OG: 1.104
FG: 1.029
ABV%: 9.88
IBU: 90-110
SRM: 32-34

Recipe for 5 Gallon Batch

Extracts:
13 lb Maris Otter Extract
1 lb D180 Candi Syrup

Steeping Grains:
1.5 lb Crystal 60L
.75 lb Breiss Aromatic
.75 lb Breiss Chocolate

Hops:
2 oz Magnum (AA 10-14%) for 90 mins - for bittering
2 oz Kent Goldings (AA 4-6%) for 60 mins - for bittering
2 oz Kent Goldings (AA 4-6%) for 20 mins - for aroma

Yeast:
Edinburgh Ale Yeast (Whitelabs WLP028)

Additives:
2 packs vanilla beans (6 beans) - Added in primary for 2 weeks
2 oz bourbon chunks, heavy char - Added in primary for 1 week

Additional notes: Rack to secondary at 2 weeks after fermentation start.

Let me know what you think! Thanks everyone!



Offline jeffy

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2014, 08:25:20 PM »
It doesn't look roasty enough to be a stout.  Too many BU's to be an Old Ale.  Perhaps an American Barleywine?  The oak and vanilla throw it into a whole other genre anyway.
Can I have some?  Without the vanilla?
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2014, 08:35:36 PM »
I agree, not roasty enough for stout. Bourbon Barrel Vanilla Imperial American Brown Ale ? Now say that 3 times. Sounds good to me !
Jon H.

Offline codymclelland

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2014, 08:33:22 PM »
Yeah I didn't think there was enough roast to bring out characteristics like a stout, the guesstimation was based more on SRM, IBU, and ABV.

Bourbon Barrel Vanilla Imperial American Brown Ale ? Now say that 3 times. Sounds good to me !

I like the thought of an Imperial American Brown Ale! What specifically qualifies a beer as Imperial?

Can I have some?  Without the vanilla?

I'll let you know how it turns out so that if you are interested, you can brew a batch and get more feedback about the particular style!

Thanks for the feedback guys!

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2014, 08:43:54 PM »

I like the thought of an Imperial American Brown Ale! What specifically qualifies a beer as Imperial?


Generally, bigger or scaled up.  Whereas American Brown Ale is listed as ~ 1.045 - 1.060ish OG, an 'Imperial' version would be well above 1.060 OG.

EDIT -  I have an American Brown on tap now with an OG of 1.069, so it could technically be called an Imperial American Brown Ale.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 08:55:12 PM by HoosierBrew »
Jon H.

Offline codymclelland

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2014, 09:02:15 PM »

Generally, bigger or scaled up.  Whereas American Brown Ale is listed as ~ 1.045 - 1.060ish OG, an 'Imperial' version would be well above 1.060 OG.


Ah, well then this would certainly qualify since the OG came in a 1.102.

Offline codymclelland

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2014, 11:19:08 PM »
Update:

So I racked the beer to a secondary after 2 weeks of fermentation (2 weeks with vanilla beans and 1 week with bourbon chunks). I racked it to get the beer off of the bourbon chunks since I read that after a week the wood has given off most of its flavors and can start to give off flavors.

When I racked I did a quick gravity test and the beer came in at 1.033. I just did another gravity test today (4 days after racking) and the gravity is still at 1.033.

The estimate that I had from Brewer's Friend for FG was 1.029. It looks like the attenuation that I got up to this point is about 66%. So my question is if I hit the mark and fermentation is done or if there is something I can/should do to bring the gravity down a hair more?

Thanks for the help everyone!
« Last Edit: November 20, 2014, 11:20:56 PM by codymclelland »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2014, 11:26:32 PM »
Update:

So I racked the beer to a secondary after 2 weeks of fermentation (2 weeks with vanilla beans and 1 week with bourbon chunks). I racked it to get the beer off of the bourbon chunks since I read that after a week the wood has given off most of its flavors and can start to give off flavors.

When I racked I did a quick gravity test and the beer came in at 1.033. I just did another gravity test today (4 days after racking) and the gravity is still at 1.033.

The estimate that I had from Brewer's Friend for FG was 1.029. So my question is if I hit the mark and fermentation is done or if there is something I can/should do to bring the gravity down a hair more?

Thanks for the help everyone!

Gently rouse the yeast and warm up the beer to 70-75F - even by carrying it to a warmer room for a few days. The rousing and warmer temp may spur the yeast into chewing a couple more gravity points. If not, keep in mind that software estimates are just that - estimates. Lots of factors go into detemining FG. Give the warming and rousing close to a week and check. If you're still @ 1.033, bottle or keg it. Good luck !
Jon H.

Offline codymclelland

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2014, 11:30:41 PM »

Gently rouse the yeast and warm up the beer to 70-75F - even by carrying it to a warmer room for a few days. The rousing and warmer temp may spur the yeast into chewing a couple more gravity points. If not, keep in mind that software estimates are just that - estimates. Lots of factors go into detemining FG. Give the warming and rousing close to a week and check. If you're still @ 1.033, bottle or keg it. Good luck !

Sounds like a solid plan! Also, for future brews that have high ABV, should I double pitch on brew day and would that make much of a difference for the final gravity?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2014, 11:43:36 PM »
Don't know how much you pitched , but using Mr Malty won't steer you wrong in terms of how much yeast to pitch :

http://www.mrmalty.com/
Jon H.

Offline codymclelland

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Re: What style is this recipe most like?
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2014, 12:54:21 AM »
Don't know how much you pitched , but using Mr Malty won't steer you wrong in terms of how much yeast to pitch :

http://www.mrmalty.com/

I did one vial of the Edinburgh Ale Yeast, looks like the calculator recommended 3! I'm surprised that I got as high of a level of attenuation that I did.

Thanks again!