Author Topic: Darkening the beer  (Read 828 times)

Offline DW

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Darkening the beer
« on: November 13, 2014, 03:20:27 AM »
Can you darken a beer without affecting gravity or flavor?  I ask this because I wanted to brew a bock that comes in at 18 SRM, but I was really hoping to take it to 22-25 SRM.  This is the bock recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. 

Offline Stevie

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2014, 03:24:41 AM »
You could cold steep the dark grains, add the dark grains late in the mash, or use sinamar.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2014, 04:03:54 AM »
Sinamar is probably the best way.

Alternatively you could figure out how much D-180 Extra Dark Belgian Candi Syrup you would have to use to get your SRMs up... probably about 3/4 lb for 5 gallons or something like that.  Then from there, calculate exactly how much water to mix it with to hit exactly your original original gravity, then add it and let it ferment out.  This will impact flavor a little bit, but in nothing but a good way I would think.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2014, 11:35:21 AM »
Getting the beer darker will be easy using either Sinmar or carafa special (I, II or II). For the malt cold steep will help you achieve color but with minimizing the roast character pick up. By far Sinmar is the easiest way to go.

Offline DW

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2014, 03:54:33 PM »
How much sinamar would I put in?  If I did the Sinamar how would I know how much to put in to get an extra 4-6 SRM?  Also, how would the cold steep work?  Would I have to cold steep the sinamar?  Would I have to cold steep all of the partial mash grains?  Would I have to only add the cold steeped liquid late in the boil?  Thanks for all the help!

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2014, 04:20:52 PM »
How much sinamar would I put in?  If I did the Sinamar how would I know how much to put in to get an extra 4-6 SRM?  Also, how would the cold steep work?  Would I have to cold steep the sinamar?  Would I have to cold steep all of the partial mash grains?  Would I have to only add the cold steeped liquid late in the boil?  Thanks for all the help!

sinamar is a liquid extract of carafa malt. there are directions on the container I think and i beleive it's included in the database in beersmith, possibly other calculators as well.

if you go cold steep you only steep the dark grains and add the liquor to the boil. mini mash at mash temps so ~155f.
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Offline denny

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2014, 04:48:44 PM »
How much sinamar would I put in?  If I did the Sinamar how would I know how much to put in to get an extra 4-6 SRM?  Also, how would the cold steep work?  Would I have to cold steep the sinamar?  Would I have to cold steep all of the partial mash grains?  Would I have to only add the cold steeped liquid late in the boil?  Thanks for all the help!

You put in as much as you need to get the color you want.  That's the beauty of sinamar.  I add some to the kettle pull a sample and look at it, and adjust as needed.  The cold streep refers to steeping grain to make your own Sinamr like extract.
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Offline hamiltont

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2014, 07:05:56 PM »
At 550 Lovibond Briess' Midnight Wheat will definitely adjust your color with minimal alteration to the flavor. You can add it late in the mash if you're concerned at all about any flavor coming through..

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Assets/PDFs/Briess_PISB_MidnightWheatMalt.pdf
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Offline blatz

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2014, 07:16:04 PM »
At 550 Lovibond Briess' Midnight Wheat will definitely adjust your color with minimal alteration to the flavor. You can add it late in the mash if you're concerned at all about any flavor coming through..

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Assets/PDFs/Briess_PISB_MidnightWheatMalt.pdf

been using that a lot the last few years.  I like it a lot.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Darkening the beer
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2014, 07:39:21 PM »
+2 for Midnight Wheat. Plenty of color, very mild roast.
Jon H.