Author Topic: Timing a D rest  (Read 2592 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2014, 02:04:09 PM »
This brings to mind that many seem to pay less attention on brew day and then fuss over that fermentor way too much. Some of my better beers were left alone at the end, because I had other things taking up my time. Maybe a good thing to do is just find something else to do for a week or two after terminal gravity.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2014, 02:34:01 PM »
This brings to mind that many seem to pay less attention on brew day and then fuss over that fermentor way too much. Some of my better beers were left alone at the end, because I had other things taking up my time. Maybe a good thing to do is just find something else to do for a week or two after terminal gravity.


^^^^^ I agree, Jim. At the home level, little or nothing bad (and usually something good) comes from leaving the beer on the yeast an extra week. I never have the byproducts in my beers that come from racking too soon. No coincidence.
Jon H.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2014, 02:41:42 PM »
I'll kick with what I have been doing with lagers:

pitch at 45-50f and hold there until day 5ish. bump 5 degrees every 12 hours (or so) until I get to 65. hold there until done and then back off 5 degrees every 12 hours (or so) until I'm at or around 32 and hold till there is space in a keg.

Have you noticed any O2/airlock liquid suckback when you are dropping the temps in this fashion or even when you are holding it at 32 until there is an available keg?

I use an 'S' type airlock so no liquid suck back happens. air, I assume, does enter but I have not seen any ill effects from that. I have not brewed a very delicate light lager as of yet but I have brewed marzens that stood up just fine over the 1-3 month life of a batch, kolsch as well.
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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2014, 11:20:48 PM »
I missed the D rest window i think..it has been in primary since oct 23rd..i pulled a sample today( day 9) and i was at the target final gravity of 1010 already..I tasted it and i detect diacetyl..not a butter bomb but its there..I took it out of the chamber gonna let it rise to the 60's..Is there still hope that the yeast will clean it up? i gave the fermenter a little swirl to rouse the yeast..Anything else i can or should do?

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2014, 11:26:53 PM »
its going to be tough-just depends on how much of the yeast is still in suspension and working on your behalf. let it rise up to 65F and hold for 48 hours anyway. if you still detect it, you can make a small 1 liter starter and when it krausens, pitch it in. us-05 works well for this.
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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2014, 11:33:37 PM »
its going to be tough-just depends on how much of the yeast is still in suspension and working on your behalf. let it rise up to 65F and hold for 48 hours anyway. if you still detect it, you can make a small 1 liter starter and when it krausens, pitch it in. us-05 works well for this.

it is still pretty cloudy with yeast and when i pulled a sample there was lots of yeast rafts on the surface..Hopefully that will be enough for the D rest..good to know i can pitch a active starter if all else fails..thanks alot Wort Hog..you da man

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2014, 11:40:30 PM »
what lager did you make? just curious.

couple lessons i learned that really helped with diacetyl: pitch lots of yeast-1 gal + starter. pitch at 45-46F, let it come up to 48-49F and hold it there for about 5 days of active fermentation. let temp rise 3-5 deg per 12 hours and when you get to 65F, let it go there for another 48hours. when i do this, all is well and clean as a whistle.
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2014, 11:52:35 PM »
I made a Boston lager style except i used munich lager yeast..I did a 2L starter decanted stepped up with another 2L and added a smack pack( it was getting old so i threw it in)..pitched cool at around 50 give or take a few degrees and lowered it to about 46 and let it rise to 48 and held it steady since oct 23..today i started to ramp the temp..It tasted very much like boston lager just had that slight buttery flavor a little bit of slickness..if i can get rid of the butter i think i have a winner..First time i messed with water chemistry aswell..I appreciate all your help.

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2014, 12:01:09 AM »
good-so next time try pitching at 46F vs at 50+ and lowering, then follow the schedule from there. its can be frustrating making lagers at first, but stick to it, keep good notes, and you'll be where you want to be in no time.
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2014, 12:04:01 AM »
good-so next time try pitching at 46F vs at 50+ and lowering, then follow the schedule from there. its can be frustrating making lagers at first, but stick to it, keep good notes, and you'll be where you want to be in no time.

+1. I pitch @ 46-47F and ferment @ 50F for most lagers.
Jon H.

Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #25 on: December 03, 2014, 12:09:36 AM »
Yup pitching at 46 for now on..it was difficult getting the wort temp down..I gonna buy a small pump and recirculate ice water thru the chiller..With the  tap water i was only able to get it down to around 55 and that took awhile then i threw it in the chest freezer to drop it down more but i started to worry about it just sitting there without yeast so i pitched in the 50 degree neighborhood..Once i take care of this diacetyl either by raising the temp or active starter..im gonna lager this sucker for at least 2 months maybe more..im pretty confident it will be quaffable..cheers

Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2014, 12:22:16 AM »
One more question..This beer calls for a dry hopping i quess during the D rest is a good idea right? or should i make sure this diacetyl is sorted out first?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2014, 12:30:35 AM »
One more question..This beer calls for a dry hopping i quess during the D rest is a good idea right? or should i make sure this diacetyl is sorted out first?

Dry hopped beer is best fresh, so do your D rest, lager it, then dry hop @ room temp a week before packaging.
Jon H.

Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #28 on: December 03, 2014, 12:44:56 AM »
One more question..This beer calls for a dry hopping i quess during the D rest is a good idea right? or should i make sure this diacetyl is sorted out first?

Dry hopped beer is best fresh, so do your D rest, lager it, then dry hop @ room temp a week before packaging.

Cool sounds like a plan..thanks bud

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2014, 12:47:00 AM »
One more question..This beer calls for a dry hopping i quess during the D rest is a good idea right? or should i make sure this diacetyl is sorted out first?

Dry hopped beer is best fresh, so do your D rest, lager it, then dry hop @ room temp a week before packaging.

Cool sounds like a plan..thanks bud

Good luck ! Be sure to post how it comes out.
Jon H.