Author Topic: Timing a D rest  (Read 2832 times)

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #30 on: December 03, 2014, 12:48:03 AM »
Also, don't be overly concerned about letting the wort chill for a period in your lager freezer. If your sanitation is sound, that wort will be fine chilling to proper pitching temps.


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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #31 on: December 03, 2014, 01:31:47 AM »
Also, don't be overly concerned about letting the wort chill for a period in your lager freezer. If your sanitation is sound, that wort will be fine chilling to proper pitching temps.

Very good to know for my next lager run

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Offline theDarkSide

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #32 on: December 03, 2014, 02:21:25 PM »
Also, don't be overly concerned about letting the wort chill for a period in your lager freezer. If your sanitation is sound, that wort will be fine chilling to proper pitching temps.


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I always let my lagers sit in the fermentation chamber overnight, then I transfer to another carboy, hit with O2, and pitch the yeast.  It's amazing how much break material settles in just 12-14 hours.  Pitch at 45F, free-rise to 50F then a D-Rest at 55-56F for a couple days.
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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2014, 02:42:45 AM »
i just kegged and started the lagering process..was kinda strange,  it almost had a wine like character but finished malty/hoppy ..Anybody know what this wine flavor is? is very subtle but very annoying..im hoping the lagering will take care of it..Lager styles are tricky i am quickly realizing

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2014, 03:00:33 AM »
i just kegged and started the lagering process..was kinda strange,  it almost had a wine like character but finished malty/hoppy ..Anybody know what this wine flavor is? is very subtle but very annoying..im hoping the lagering will take care of it..Lager styles are tricky i am quickly realizing

hmm. if by wine like you mean vinegar like, that can be acetobacter infection.

what kind of beer was it you made?
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2014, 03:31:13 AM »
I could see acetaldehyde giving an impression of wine-like if you're not familiar with it. Sherry like could be oxidized ingredients (grain) I suppose

Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #36 on: December 10, 2014, 05:04:28 AM »
I could see acetaldehyde giving an impression of wine-like if you're not familiar with it. Sherry like could be oxidized ingredients (grain) I suppose
[/quote

you know since you said that it made me notice im getting a apple note rather then wine..there is no sour vinegar presence at all..i just confused wine with apple some how..im getting sam adams with a splash of apple juice..gonna let her rip @ 33 for 2 months

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #37 on: December 10, 2014, 06:16:02 AM »
My guess, acetaldehyde. It might reduce in time, might not. If its still drinkable but just annoying,  maybe dry hop it to cover.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #38 on: December 10, 2014, 01:13:44 PM »
+2 to acetaldehyde.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #39 on: December 10, 2014, 06:53:29 PM »
if it's acetaldehyde you should be able to 'boil' it out. acetaldehyde boils at around 70*f so if you take a sample and warm it to 75 for a day you should no longer taste the apple, or at least it should be reduced.

You might also be able to deal with it by krausening the beer (pitching a large active starter into the beer).
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Offline AnimALE

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2014, 07:49:40 PM »
if it's acetaldehyde you should be able to 'boil' it out. acetaldehyde boils at around 70*f so if you take a sample and warm it to 75 for a day you should no longer taste the apple, or at least it should be reduced.

You might also be able to deal with it by krausening the beer (pitching a large active starter into the beer).

Thats what im gonna do..Does the yeast choice matter for krausening? I have a pack of S-33 on hand will that work? Or go with a clean strain like us 05?

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Timing a D rest
« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2014, 08:35:47 PM »
if it's acetaldehyde you should be able to 'boil' it out. acetaldehyde boils at around 70*f so if you take a sample and warm it to 75 for a day you should no longer taste the apple, or at least it should be reduced.

You might also be able to deal with it by krausening the beer (pitching a large active starter into the beer).

Thats what im gonna do..Does the yeast choice matter for krausening? I have a pack of S-33 on hand will that work? Or go with a clean strain like us 05?

it shouldn't matter much but I would lean towards either the same yeast you used in primary or a neutral yeast. make a 1 or 2 liter starter and when it's cranking pitch into the apple batch.
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