Author Topic: Rest Mash and Mash Out  (Read 1924 times)

Offline irob1992

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Rest Mash and Mash Out
« on: December 27, 2014, 12:46:32 AM »
I'm trying to follow a recipe and am a little confused as how to handle the mash times. The recipe says:

"employ an upward infusion mash with a 30 minute rest at 152 F. Raise the temperature to 165 F for mash off"

So do I only mash at 152 F for 30 min total?

How long do I mash at 165 F for?

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2014, 01:35:32 AM »
I would do the 152º for 60 to 90 minutes then run off. If you are sparging I'd sparge with 170-175

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2014, 01:55:59 AM »
I would mash at 152 for at least 40 minutes.  No need to perform a mashout in a normal homebrew setting.  Just get the sweet wort heating up towards a boil as soon as you are able.  This way the "mashout" at 165 takes care of itself as the temperature continues to climb towards 212.  Mashouts are for huge batches (e.g. commercial brewing) where you cannot get up to a boil within an hour or so.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2014, 02:06:10 AM »
You wouldn't really be resting @ 165F. The idea in the recipe is to do a mashout, which sort of locks in your fermentable sugar profile by stopping additional enzyme activity. Most homebrewers don't do a true mashout since, especially in the case of batch sparging, the time between mash runoff and bringing the wort to a boil is pretty small anyway. Like Jim said, I'd do a 60 minute mash @ 152F. It'll make a good beer.

EDIT - I see now you covered mash out, Dave !
« Last Edit: December 27, 2014, 02:07:47 AM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline irob1992

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2014, 02:21:45 AM »
I see, that makes much more sense! Thank you!!
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2014, 03:51:47 AM »
I like the hotter water for sparging because I have a whacky idea that it rinses the grain better. Plus its all got to be heated to a boil anyway, why not get a bump in that direction

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2014, 04:01:41 AM »
I like the hotter water for sparging because I have a whacky idea that it rinses the grain better. Plus its all got to be heated to a boil anyway, why not get a bump in that direction

Me too. I still sparge at round 190ish.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2014, 05:40:26 PM »
I like the hotter water for sparging because I have a whacky idea that it rinses the grain better. Plus its all got to be heated to a boil anyway, why not get a bump in that direction

Me too. I still sparge at round 190ish.

Same here.
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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2014, 09:57:08 PM »
Yep, me too (long as we're all jumping on this bandwagon).
Dave

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2014, 12:11:28 AM »
Me too

Offline Hooper

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2014, 03:04:20 AM »
I fly sparged and decided to go cowboy and sparge in the 190s...those beers tasted grainy and/or astringent. I am now doing a modified batch sparge and keeping my grain bed at 168 max. I am much happier with the results. Taste your wort before you boil and see what you think.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2014, 03:25:48 AM »
I fly sparged and decided to go cowboy and sparge in the 190s...those beers tasted grainy and/or astringent. I am now doing a modified batch sparge and keeping my grain bed at 168 max. I am much happier with the results. Taste your wort before you boil and see what you think.

I use 190F water for batch sparging and don't get astringency, BUT only since I started better pH control. I got astringency before when I sparged @ 160F with sub par pH control. So I'm convinced it's much more a pH issue than a sparge temp issue.
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Offline Hooper

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2014, 03:51:34 AM »
I fly sparged and decided to go cowboy and sparge in the 190s...those beers tasted grainy and/or astringent. I am now doing a modified batch sparge and keeping my grain bed at 168 max. I am much happier with the results. Taste your wort before you boil and see what you think.

I use 190F water for batch sparging and don't get astringency, BUT only since I started better pH control. I got astringency before when I sparged @ 160F with sub par pH control. So I'm convinced it's much more a pH issue than a sparge temp issue.

If you are Batch Sparging...Aren't you shooting for ~168 prior to draining?
“Stay with the beer. Beer is continuous blood. A continuous lover.”
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2014, 03:59:49 AM »
I fly sparged and decided to go cowboy and sparge in the 190s...those beers tasted grainy and/or astringent. I am now doing a modified batch sparge and keeping my grain bed at 168 max. I am much happier with the results. Taste your wort before you boil and see what you think.

I use 190F water for batch sparging and don't get astringency, BUT only since I started better pH control. I got astringency before when I sparged @ 160F with sub par pH control. So I'm convinced it's much more a pH issue than a sparge temp issue.

If you are Batch Sparging...Aren't you shooting for ~168 prior to draining?

Nope. In a true mashout (which homebrewers generally don't do), the grain bed temp is raised and held to around 168F.  It would take water considerably hotter to raise the grain bed to 168.
Jon H.

Offline Hooper

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Re: Rest Mash and Mash Out
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2014, 04:13:14 AM »
I fly sparged and decided to go cowboy and sparge in the 190s...those beers tasted grainy and/or astringent. I am now doing a modified batch sparge and keeping my grain bed at 168 max. I am much happier with the results. Taste your wort before you boil and see what you think.

I use 190F water for batch sparging and don't get astringency, BUT only since I started better pH control. I got astringency before when I sparged @ 160F with sub par pH control. So I'm convinced it's much more a pH issue than a sparge temp issue.

If you are Batch Sparging...Aren't you shooting for ~168 prior to draining?

Nope. In a true mashout (which homebrewers generally don't do), the grain bed temp is raised and held to around 168F.  It would take water considerably hotter to raise the grain bed to 168.

True on first mash out...but when i get down to about 2 inches above the bed...I stop draining and mash out again at 168 for what I call a modified Batch Sprage...That takes water about ~168...
“Stay with the beer. Beer is continuous blood. A continuous lover.”
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