Author Topic: cold crashing  (Read 1923 times)

Offline homoeccentricus

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cold crashing
« on: December 29, 2014, 08:38:52 PM »


Drew's Citra Saison. Finished at 1.002. Still in primary. Simple newbie question: should I cold crash or not?
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Offline majorvices

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2014, 08:42:33 PM »
I cold condition every beer I brew for at least a few days. Even wheat beers, and yes ... saisons.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2014, 08:52:59 PM »
+1. it's easier to transfer with minimal gunk that way. and it does seem to clean the flavor up a bit.
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2014, 08:56:11 PM »
+1 i cold crash all-some longer than others as mentioned.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2014, 09:14:57 PM »
I crash everything except hefe and wit.  As for saison, it depends on the strain I use - I don't want a turbid looking beer, but I do think saison (being a yeast driven beer) is best with a slight amount of haze. I remember using gelatin on the first saison I made and feeling it was too clean, as all the yeast obviously dropped out.
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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2014, 09:32:28 PM »
It's French Saison.
Frank P.

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Offline brewinhard

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2014, 10:59:02 PM »
If it has dropped fairly bright, then I would not bother cold crashing as i too like saisons with a bit of haze.  But if it is still quite yeasty, then by all means a 24-48 hr cold crash would not hurt it whatsoever. 

Offline Stevie

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2014, 11:02:39 PM »
I don't bother crashing saisons. I too like a touch of haze.

Offline JT

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2014, 11:12:22 PM »
I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 

Offline majorvices

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2014, 11:13:43 PM »
I don't bother crashing saisons. I too like a touch of haze.

I cold crash my belgian wheat to collect the yeast for harvesting and still have plenty of haze. Low floccing strains won't usually drop clear just from cold crashing alone and will require some fining to drop bright. I think the main reason to cold crash is to drop the yeast out for harvesting but I think it also helps to round out the flavor of the beer. And, of course, you want to store all your beer cold (or at least cool) to preserve freshness. I personally feel that every beer, even German Wheat beers, benefit from a period of cold conditioning.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2014, 11:20:56 PM by majorvices »

Offline Stevie

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2014, 11:51:24 PM »

I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2014, 12:23:54 AM »

I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.
At the very end I bring them up to 98.6º as rapidly as I can for final filtering

Offline Stevie

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2014, 12:24:42 AM »


I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.
At the very end I bring them up to 98.6º as rapidly as I can for final filtering
Took me a second.  long day

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2014, 01:18:32 AM »


I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.
At the very end I bring them up to 98.6º as rapidly as I can for final filtering
Took me a second.  long day

Took me a minute too. Well done, Jim.  ;)
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Offline Hooper

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2014, 02:05:27 AM »


I cold crash all of my beers... In the keg. 
What he said.
At the very end I bring them up to 98.6º as rapidly as I can for final filtering
Took me a second.  long day

Took me a minute too. Well done, Jim.  ;)

+ 1 at least Jim...

I don't secondary or cold crash...(all general statements are untrue)...Just fine with gelatin and keg...pretty beer...
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