Author Topic: fermentation schedule for first lager.  (Read 6966 times)

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2015, 01:45:17 pm »
Yeah I just have a lot to learn. I didn't realize pitching at 59 was too warm. I thought it might help it take off quicker and didn't realize it would do more harm than good.
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Online tommymorris

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2015, 02:53:28 pm »
I learned this the hardway. There is a lot of misinformation on the internet. I got diacetyl the first few lagers I made. If you get diacetyl try krausening as fix. It works.

Offline jeffy

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2015, 02:54:57 pm »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2015, 04:34:24 pm »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

Yeah that seems counterintuitive to do that. I've tried a beer fermented like that and it was clean. The guy used 2124 which is pretty clean obviously. But I wouldn't do it myself either.
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Offline JT

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2015, 08:25:42 pm »
I think the only real advantage would be faster fermentation start = less time time for wild yeast to take hold.  I know some of the big yeast brands recommend this method, but I personally don't do it either. 

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2015, 04:37:07 am »
I think the only real advantage would be faster fermentation start = less time time for wild yeast to take hold.  I know some of the big yeast brands recommend this method, but I personally don't do it either.
Thats my guess but (at the risk of sounding snotty) I don't follow the thought process. I'm worried about wild yeast throwing an off flavor so I'll force my pitched yeast to throw off flavors...

Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2015, 04:48:06 am »
I think the only real advantage would be faster fermentation start = less time time for wild yeast to take hold.  I know some of the big yeast brands recommend this method, but I personally don't do it either.

Otoh cooler temps also inhibit wild yeast and other microbes. Not many beer spoiling microorganisms grow very fast at 48 degrees.

Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2015, 04:49:31 am »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

Guess it can be done then. But I would always advice against it from my own personal experience.

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2015, 07:43:27 am »
Day 3 and it is holding steady at 52F. Should I expect a sulfury smell because that has been absent? Once I decide to start bumping up the temp, I will move it from the water bath to ambient room temp and to an insulated fermentation chamber with space heater if needed. It will be hard to control but 2 degrees per day will be the goal. 

My buddy uses s23 quite a bit at ale temps then cold crashes and lagers. His most popular beer is made this way which is why I try not to worry too much. He does multiple things against convention but continues to make better beer than I...haha!

Due to equipment restrictions, I only have the ability to lager probably 3 months out of the year and it still isn't ideal. If this recipe turns out good I may just do it as a 'pseudo lager' during the warm months with US05, WY1007, or something that I can run around 60F.
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Up Next: mexi lager, Germerican pale ale

rabeb25

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2015, 08:10:20 am »
Also for future refernce pay attention to the recommended pitch rates of the yeast at certain temperatures.. They vary dramatically, referencing 34/70 specifically.

This famous yeast strain from Weihenstephan in Germany is used world-wide within the brewing industry. Saflager W-34/70 allows to brew beers
with a good balance of floral and fruity aromas and gives clean flavors and high drinkable beers.
fermentation
temperature
:
9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)
dosage
instructions
:
80 to 120 g/hl for pitching at 12C – 15°C (53-59°F).
increase dosage for pitching below 12°C (53°F), up to 200 to 300 g/hl at 9°C (48°F)


So for 5 gallons
100g/hl, pitching rate is 19 grams (56f)~ 2 packets
200g/hl, pitching rate is 37.85 (53f)~ 3.5 packets
300g/hl,pitching rate that is 56.78 grams (48f) ~ 5 packets
This is for a modest sub 1.050 beer.


 
« Last Edit: January 02, 2015, 08:16:00 am by rabeb25 »

rabeb25

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #25 on: January 02, 2015, 08:13:01 am »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

http://brulosophy.com/2014/12/15/the-temp-at-which-we-pitch-exbeeriment-results/

Offline erockrph

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #26 on: January 02, 2015, 11:31:27 am »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

http://brulosophy.com/2014/12/15/the-temp-at-which-we-pitch-exbeeriment-results/
Interesting experiment, but it was for an ale, where some esters are appropriate. I'd love to see the same experiment for a lager yeast pitched at 60F vs 45F
Eric B.

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Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #27 on: January 02, 2015, 12:40:55 pm »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

http://brulosophy.com/2014/12/15/the-temp-at-which-we-pitch-exbeeriment-results/
Interesting experiment, but it was for an ale, where some esters are appropriate. I'd love to see the same experiment for a lager yeast pitched at 60F vs 45F

Yes, another experiment is in order. I believe it is also yeast dependent. I also believe warm temps are more a problem with fusels on ales, not esters.