Author Topic: fermentation schedule for first lager.  (Read 2761 times)

Offline goschman

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fermentation schedule for first lager.
« on: December 31, 2014, 07:59:42 PM »
Just pitched 34/70 into 1.056 wort at 59F. I am thinking about keeping it around 60F until fermentation takes off then bringing it down to 55F or so. Does this sound about right? In a couple of weeks do a diacetyl rest around 65 before lagering?

How much lag time should I expect? I was thinking 24-36 hours.
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Offline denny

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2014, 08:13:18 PM »
Reduce the temp now.  A faster start isn't worth the off flavors created by starting warm.
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Offline Jimmy K

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2014, 08:16:26 PM »
From what I understand, most yeast flavors are produced during the growth phase. So waiting to cool will be too late.
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Offline goschman

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2014, 08:21:18 PM »
Thanks. What temp should I bring it down to? Apparently it can run at 45f though I doubt I can get it that low. It is currently in a 55F water bath so I will get some frozen water bottles in. How much lag should I expect?

EDIT: Found this from the website: "9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)" so I am not too worried. Gonna try to get it down a couple of degrees...
« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 08:29:15 PM by goschman »
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Offline goschman

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2014, 10:07:06 PM »
Found another thread with the 18 day fermentation schedule with 24 days of lagering. I will try to follow this the best that I can. Thanks for the input.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2014, 10:10:47 PM by goschman »
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2014, 11:01:25 PM »
The best schedule is determined by your yeast under your conditions. Always go by gravity rather than calendar.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2014, 11:20:23 PM »
The best schedule is determined by your yeast under your conditions. Always go by gravity rather than calendar.


Yep
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Offline goschman

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2014, 11:24:34 PM »
The best schedule is determined by your yeast under your conditions. Always go by gravity rather than calendar.

That is kind of a given. I should have said I will try to stick to that schedule depending on my gravity.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2015, 12:34:17 AM »
The best schedule is determined by your yeast under your conditions. Always go by gravity rather than calendar.

That is kind of a given. I should have said I will try to stick to that schedule depending on my gravity.
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Offline quattlebaum

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2015, 04:06:57 AM »
I use this yeast a lot. I pitch cold 48 to 50F and let free rise to 54 till finished. just pitched a 3 gal batch of 1.050 and it finished in 9 days. Great yeast but does not like below 50. Takes up to 48 hrs to really see "signs" of fermentation mostly.

Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2015, 03:02:49 PM »
As Denny pointed out, you will not get lager-like flavors by starting fermentation out warm. During the first 72 hours is when the yeast make most of the fermentation characteristics that will be the flavor of the beer. If your fermenting warm, you won't get the flavor characteristics you are looking for in a lager. It may not make a bad beer, but if your going to create ale-like esters in your lager, why not just stick with ale yeasts? That doesn't make much sense, now, does it?

For my lager schedule I start out at 48 before I pitch yeast. Aerate twice as long as ales (I prefer pure o2) pitch twice as much yeast, and let fermentation kick into high krausen at those cold temps. After about 72-96 hours you might decide to bump the temp up 2 degrees, and continue doing so every 24 hours until you get up to 56-58 degrees and let the fermentation slowly finish up. When signs of fermentation seriously start to slow down you could even let the temp raise to 60-62 to really let the beer finish cleaning itself up. Wait a few days around the 58-62 degree mark after fermentation has mostly stopped, then you can crash down to 32-34 degrees and lager for at least 1-2 weeks.

For low gravity lagers, you really only need a couple of weeks lagering time as long as you had a healthy fermentation, pitched at proper temps and got a good d-rest, etc.

Higher gravity you may want 4-6 weeks lagering.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2015, 03:16:49 PM by majorvices »

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2015, 05:33:48 PM »
As Denny pointed out, you will not get lager-like flavors by starting fermentation out warm. During the first 72 hours is when the yeast make most of the fermentation characteristics that will be the flavor of the beer. If your fermenting warm, you won't get the flavor characteristics you are looking for in a lager. It may not make a bad beer, but if your going to create ale-like esters in your lager, why not just stick with ale yeasts? That doesn't make much sense, now, does it?

For my lager schedule I start out at 48 before I pitch yeast. Aerate twice as long as ales (I prefer pure o2) pitch twice as much yeast, and let fermentation kick into high krausen at those cold temps. After about 72-96 hours you might decide to bump the temp up 2 degrees, and continue doing so every 24 hours until you get up to 56-58 degrees and let the fermentation slowly finish up. When signs of fermentation seriously start to slow down you could even let the temp raise to 60-62 to really let the beer finish cleaning itself up. Wait a few days around the 58-62 degree mark after fermentation has mostly stopped, then you can crash down to 32-34 degrees and lager for at least 1-2 weeks.

For low gravity lagers, you really only need a couple of weeks lagering time as long as you had a healthy fermentation, pitched at proper temps and got a good d-rest, etc.

Higher gravity you may want 4-6 weeks lagering.

This is close to what I do. Lagering at -1C is something I did for all of my lagers last year.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2015, 05:37:20 PM »
Yeah, I should say as cold as you can without freezing the beer. For me about 33 is as cold as I can get my conicals and BBTs. On the 12 gallon size batches I do that in a walk-in and it only gets down to about 38.

Offline goschman

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2015, 08:00:14 PM »
I am seeing airlock activity within 24 hours which surprises me. It is currently at 52F. Maybe I shouldn't trust Fermentis but they say 53.6F - 59F is ideal for this strain. I am not worried that the temp dropped from pitching temp of 59 to 52 overnight. I am confident it will be a good beer.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2015, 08:01:45 PM by goschman »
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Offline majorvices

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Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2015, 08:40:56 PM »
I am seeing airlock activity within 24 hours which surprises me. It is currently at 52F. Maybe I shouldn't trust Fermentis but they say 53.6F - 59F is ideal for this strain. I am not worried that the temp dropped from pitching temp of 59 to 52 overnight. I am confident it will be a good beer.

My post was just meant as a guideline. You probably didn't do any serious harm by pitching warm but understand that it is not ideal. Ideally you should cool all the way to fermentation temps before pitching.

Some of the dry strains do require a warmer ferment. The only dry strain I use any more is S-189 which can handle the colder temps. 52 is probably about right for that strain.