Author Topic: cold crashing  (Read 4736 times)

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2015, 11:57:23 am »
Thanks for the advice. I bottled today after cold crashing for 24 hours @ 5C, because I want to reuse the yeast.
Slightly off topic, but still, it's my thread: I put all the yeast and trub (no dry hops) in a sanitized jar with a 5 cm of beer floating on top of it. Is that OK? How long will it keep in the fridge?
Frank P.

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Offline Black Sands Brewery & Supply

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2015, 12:57:13 pm »
Thanks for the advice. I bottled today after cold crashing for 24 hours @ 5C, because I want to reuse the yeast.
Slightly off topic, but still, it's my thread: I put all the yeast and trub (no dry hops) in a sanitized jar with a 5 cm of beer floating on top of it. Is that OK? How long will it keep in the fridge?

I would read up on "yeast washing" if you want to harvest from a previous batch.

I'd say you are ok w/ what you did but try to use what you saved w/in 30 days. The sooner the better.
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Offline denny

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2015, 01:03:01 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.
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Offline Black Sands Brewery & Supply

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2015, 01:26:16 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

I agree. Not worth the time or effort IMO. I just use fresh yeast every batch.
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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2015, 01:40:21 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

OK, that's what I thought I had read somewhere on this forum. And the yeast remains relatively healthy for how long in the fridge? Longer than a month?
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Offline erockrph

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2015, 01:48:11 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

OK, that's what I thought I had read somewhere on this forum. And the yeast remains relatively healthy for how long in the fridge? Longer than a month?
I've gone 6+ months. As long as you make a starter most strains should be fine for a while in the fridge. You might need to start slow and do a few steps with your starters for older yeast slurries.
Eric B.

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2015, 02:03:11 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

OK, that's what I thought I had read somewhere on this forum. And the yeast remains relatively healthy for how long in the fridge? Longer than a month?
I've gone 6+ months. As long as you make a starter most strains should be fine for a while in the fridge. You might need to start slow and do a few steps with your starters for older yeast slurries.
My philosophy lately is rinsing is no bueno. I store it on the beer it made itself. If I have time to make a starter, I make a starter.  Meaning, if I repitch the next day (or that week) I just measure and repitch.  If im brewing more than a week out, I make a starter.

Offline Black Sands Brewery & Supply

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #37 on: January 04, 2015, 02:10:23 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

OK, that's what I thought I had read somewhere on this forum. And the yeast remains relatively healthy for how long in the fridge? Longer than a month?
I've gone 6+ months. As long as you make a starter most strains should be fine for a while in the fridge. You might need to start slow and do a few steps with your starters for older yeast slurries.

+1 if its a lower OG beer under 1.060 you could just pitch what you have. Over that and a starter is a good idea There is no real set time 1 month 6 months no real way to tell. The fresher the yeast the better
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Offline denny

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2015, 02:23:11 pm »
I've found yeast washing/rinsing offers no advantages and I stopped doing it years ago.

I agree. Not worth the time or effort IMO. I just use fresh yeast every batch.

I save and resue the yeast, but I just pour everything into a sanitized container and keep it refrigerated until I'm ready to use it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2015, 08:51:34 am »
OK, one more newbie question now that we're at it: I bottled Drew's citra saison (with French Saison, and NOT dry-hopped) yesterday. Should I drink this beer fresh or let it mature for a number (how many?) months? Saison and citra seem to compete with one another here...
Frank P.

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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2015, 08:54:46 am »
why choose? taste one in a couple weeks. if you then need to pick up your socks, you are probably good to go! if not, wait it out.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2015, 08:56:42 am »
OK, one more newbie question now that we're at it: I bottled Drew's citra saison (with French Saison, and NOT dry-hopped) yesterday. Should I drink this beer fresh or let it mature for a number (how many?) months? Saison and citra seem to compete with one another here...

If the Citra is a little more present than you bargained for (very strong hop), it will diminish over time, even week by week. I say give it time.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2015, 09:01:23 am »
OK, one more newbie question now that we're at it: I bottled Drew's citra saison (with French Saison, and NOT dry-hopped) yesterday. Should I drink this beer fresh or let it mature for a number (how many?) months? Saison and citra seem to compete with one another here...
Here's yet another vague answer for you - decide that one for yourself. Personally, I prefer my own Saison's with 3711 fresh. But if the hop character is too much for you right now, then let it sit for a month or so and taste one every couple of weeks from there. Once it's right where you like it, then make a note for next time and start enjoying the fruits of your labor.

It's also not too bad of an idea to save a few bottles to taste 6-12 months down the road so you can get an idea for how it ages over the long-term. While I usually drink my Saisons fresh, they age just fine for a year or more. As a newbie, each batch can be a learning experience. Taking the time to learn now through experience will pay huge dividends as you continue brewing.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer