General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Rousing Yeast

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guvna:
If anyone's unfamiliar with the concept, here's a nice piece on it: http://www.brews-bros.com/index.php/topic/921-rousing-yeast-aka-swirling/

My questions:

Even if we don't have a stuck fermentation, would rousing the yeast be a good thing? Other than keeping the yeast in suspension, would there be a benefit from driving off CO2 or sulfur components?

Also, even if there's still an active fermentation -- meaning there are frequent bubbles in the air-lock -- do we even need to worry about oxidation?

bonjour:
Rousing yeast is a great technique for keeping active yeast suspended in the wort as you are nearing the end of the fermentation of really big beers.  And No, as long as you are producing CO2 you shouldn't have to worry about oxidation.

Fred

tony:
But why bother rousing yeast if the fermentation is chugging along, unless you've selected
a strain that's unattentuative and a great flocculater?
Usually there's enough yeast in suspension to keep things going to finish.

bonjour:

--- Quote from: tony on November 11, 2009, 11:48:42 AM ---But why bother rousing yeast if the fermentation is chugging along, unless you've selected
a strain that's unattentuative and a great flocculater?
Usually there's enough yeast in suspension to keep things going to finish.

--- End quote ---
When you are brewing really big beers, they all are

Fred

guvna:

--- Quote from: tony on November 11, 2009, 11:48:42 AM ---But why bother rousing yeast if the fermentation is chugging along, unless you've selected a strain that's unattentuative and a great flocculater?
Usually there's enough yeast in suspension to keep things going to finish.

--- End quote ---

That was part of one of my questions. Is rousing yeast beneficial in other ways, i.e. does it help release CO2 and H2S from solution? One would seem beneficial for yeast health, the other for your beer's final flavor profile.

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