Author Topic: Lager Success Finally  (Read 3167 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2015, 07:33:04 PM »
It's a bit premature to claim mastery. But by george I think I've got it. What I've done different this time is pitch huge and O2 huge, pitch at a temp below target, and start the temp increase at first sign of krausen slowing. Seems to be the way to do it for me

I'm curious about the exact timing of temp increase... I've been waiting until airlock activity slows to 10 seconds plus between bubbles.  Do you think I should start the increase earlier?
Airlock activity can be misleading but my method is to slowly increase at first notice of decrease in activity

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2015, 07:36:49 PM »
I normally start increasing temp around day 5 or 6. 
Jon H.

Offline yso191

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2015, 08:43:01 PM »
On a side note...  I noticed that you clicked off post #4000 today Jim!  Congrats!  We started on this forum within a month or so of each other and I haven't reached 1000 yet.  Apparently I am the slow learner with less question-answering acumen.
Steve
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2015, 09:06:46 PM »
Apparently I am the slow learner with less question-answering acumen.
Or you prefer to listen and choose to use your words wisely. The rest of us simply spout off compulsively.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2015, 09:09:07 PM »
Apparently I am the slow learner with less question-answering acumen.
Or you prefer to listen and choose to use your words wisely. The rest of us simply spout off compulsively.

:D
Jon H.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2015, 10:20:39 PM »
On a side note...  I noticed that you clicked off post #4000 today Jim!  Congrats!  We started on this forum within a month or so of each other and I haven't reached 1000 yet.  Apparently I am the slow learner with less question-answering acumen.
Wow! Not sure how I feel about that LOL

But I guess I'm keeping my cost per post low

Offline Pandabeer

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2015, 08:31:31 PM »
Klick how long did it take u to get to that pitching temp?  ive got a vienna lager on a d Rest at around 58F for two days before i lower it again . Still on the yeast cake . Gonna prime in bottles around day 18?

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2015, 08:38:54 PM »
Klick how long did it take u to get to that pitching temp?  ive got a vienna lager on a d Rest at around 58F for two days before i lower it again . Still on the yeast cake . Gonna prime in bottles around day 18?
From boil to 48 in about 15-20minutes

Offline beersk

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2015, 03:41:18 AM »
Pretty much everything is covered here. I love lagers...actually thinking about doing lagers most of the time now as they're the beers I enjoy drinking the most. I keep trying to brew all of these oatmeal stouts and stuff and just get disappointed because they're not what I want to be drinking. Some of the best beers I've brewed have been lagers...I need to keep rollin' with that. Got a helles in the fermenter now...so excited for that.

I like to start the fermentation cold, around 48, let it roll for a few days, then increase the temp by 5 or so degrees, let it roll for a couple days more, then increase again 5 or so degrees. Then after a couple days I'll let it free rise to room temp, which is anywhere  between 63 and 70 for another week, about. Good clean beers... Best beer I ever made was a schwarzbier I made a few months ago...damn that was good. Liquid Schwarz! (patent pending ;)  )

Offline Master_Dam

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2015, 04:00:21 PM »
Guys a quick question since i am thinking to go with my first lager soon: on forums and books i have read the lagering process is suggested for 4-6 weeks at 32F after fermentation is over.. But if i have not misunderstood you guys hold it at that temperature a lot less (a week or so).. I will not keg but bottle. What do you suggest? Am i interpreting this wrong?


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Offline erockrph

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2015, 06:15:12 PM »
Guys a quick question since i am thinking to go with my first lager soon: on forums and books i have read the lagering process is suggested for 4-6 weeks at 32F after fermentation is over.. But if i have not misunderstood you guys hold it at that temperature a lot less (a week or so).. I will not keg but bottle. What do you suggest? Am i interpreting this wrong?
Yeah, I think you might be confusing our discussions about fermentation schedules with lagering. Many of us start fermentation in the upper 40's or lower 50's, then start to ramp the temperature up over a period of time to 60+ degrees to help the yeast finish up fermentation and clean up diacetyl. After that, the temp goes down to near freezing for the lagering phase. I usually shoot for 4-6 weeks of lagering, but since I lager in the keg I may cheat and sneak a taste or five earlier than that.
Eric B.

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Offline Master_Dam

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2015, 06:23:05 PM »
That's what i thought! Thanks for clarifying it!


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Online a10t2

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2015, 06:34:12 PM »
Guys a quick question since i am thinking to go with my first lager soon: on forums and books i have read the lagering process is suggested for 4-6 weeks at 32F after fermentation is over.. But if i have not misunderstood you guys hold it at that temperature a lot less (a week or so).. I will not keg but bottle. What do you suggest?

The idea of ending fermentation warm is that it accelerates the yeast metabolism and cleanup of off-flavors, reducing the need for extending cold conditioning. My average-gravity lager are generally ready after about two weeks of lagering, or about four weeks after brew day.

When bottling, I would follow the same fermentation guidelines, but then bottle and carbonate at room temperature before lagering. That will scrub any O2 out of the bottled beer and prevent potential carbonation issues from the dormant yeast.
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Offline 69franx

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2015, 08:07:19 PM »
Guys a quick question since i am thinking to go with my first lager soon: on forums and books i have read the lagering process is suggested for 4-6 weeks at 32F after fermentation is over.. But if i have not misunderstood you guys hold it at that temperature a lot less (a week or so).. I will not keg but bottle. What do you suggest?

The idea of ending fermentation warm is that it accelerates the yeast metabolism and cleanup of off-flavors, reducing the need for extending cold conditioning. My average-gravity lager are generally ready after about two weeks of lagering, or about four weeks after brew day.

When bottling, I would follow the same fermentation guidelines, but then bottle and carbonate at room temperature before lagering. That will scrub any O2 out of the bottled beer and prevent potential carbonation issues from the dormant yeast.
Sean, just looking for a little clarification here: are you saying to bottle at room temp as well as carb at room temp, or just hold at room temp after bottling to carb? I know it needs to be at room temps to carb, just wondering if its better to have at room temps when bottling rather than at lager temps. I know I have bottled fresh out of my chest freezer at lagering temps, and the only issue I had was condensation evdrywhere from my bottling bucket as the lager temp beer warmed up waiting to be bottled. In the end my carb level was fine, just checking for your thoughts
Frank L.
Fermenting: Ringler Pilsner (thanx Ron)
Conditioning: BVIP (thanx Denny)
In keg: Traquair House Clone (Skotrat style)
In the works:  Czech Dark Lager, American Pale Ale

Online a10t2

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Re: Lager Success Finally
« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2015, 10:19:12 PM »
Sean, just looking for a little clarification here: are you saying to bottle at room temp as well as carb at room temp, or just hold at room temp after bottling to carb?

I'd bottle at room temp, rather than cooling it down only to warm it back up for conditioning. Full disclosure, I've never bottled a lager, but that makes sense to me.
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