Author Topic: First All Grain test  (Read 523 times)

Offline flbrewer

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First All Grain test
« on: January 16, 2015, 12:06:44 AM »
This weekend there is a 99.9% chance that I'll be giving my all-grain setup a test run. Is there any benefit to doing a smaller batch (2.5-3 gallons) vs. doing a full 5 gallon batch?


Offline JT

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2015, 12:16:15 AM »
Less grain to buy.  Less weight to carry. That's about it. 

Offline 69franx

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2015, 12:22:25 AM »
Less finished beer to drink. Wait, that's not a benefit, but JT has the plusses
Frank L.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2015, 12:35:26 AM »
+1.  You can brew more often, more different styles by doing small batches. And if it helps you feel less skittish doing your first AG batch, then go for it. I brew most batches in 5 gallons (personal preference) but have brewed many smaller batches , so remember - it's just as easy and quick to mash for 5 gallons as it is for half that, and you'll have more beer. After you collect the runoff in your pot, it's essentially an extract batch from then on, except that you made your own superior extract. I say memorize dennybrew, rdwhahb, and do what you like. It's easier than you think.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2015, 03:36:50 AM »
It will take some time to dial in your new system. I'd really suggest brewing your typical batch sizes for a few brews. I think that's the best way to learn your new system.
Eric B.

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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2015, 04:23:11 PM »
It will take some time to dial in your new system. I'd really suggest brewing your typical batch sizes for a few brews. I think that's the best way to learn your new system.

+1. even if goes less than optimal, you will be learning and dialing in your process for your system. other than a few bucks lost (and perhaps some pride), you'll survive and probably make beer you can drink. good notes on everything you do so you can figure out improvements.

EDIT: I'm an all in type of guy-cant help myself  8)   anyway, keep it simple and just have fun whatever you decide.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 04:27:28 PM by wort-h.o.g. »
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2015, 04:33:56 PM »
It will take some time to dial in your new system. I'd really suggest brewing your typical batch sizes for a few brews. I think that's the best way to learn your new system.

+1. even if goes less than optimal, you will be learning and dialing in your process for your system. other than a few bucks lost (and perhaps some pride), you'll survive and probably make beer you can drink. good notes on everything you do so you can figure out improvements.

EDIT: I'm an all in type of guy-cant help myself  8)   anyway, keep it simple and just have fun whatever you decide.

+2.  May as well start dialing in your system from the first batch.
Jon H.

Offline denny

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2015, 04:40:56 PM »
This weekend there is a 99.9% chance that I'll be giving my all-grain setup a test run. Is there any benefit to doing a smaller batch (2.5-3 gallons) vs. doing a full 5 gallon batch?

Not the question you asked, but I wanted to pass on my first batch advice....don't freak out.  Inevitably, something won't go the way you thought it would.  Keep calm and think it through.  Take good notes so you can adjust next time.  Remember, malted barley WANTS to become beer!  No matter what happens, you'll make beer and you'll learn more about making beer.  And I repeat, don't freak out.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: First All Grain test
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2015, 12:56:29 AM »

This weekend there is a 99.9% chance that I'll be giving my all-grain setup a test run. Is there any benefit to doing a smaller batch (2.5-3 gallons) vs. doing a full 5 gallon batch?

Not the question you asked, but I wanted to pass on my first batch advice....don't freak out.  Inevitably, something won't go the way you thought it would.  Keep calm and think it through.  Take good notes so you can adjust next time.  Remember, malted barley WANTS to become beer!  No matter what happens, you'll make beer and you'll learn more about making beer.  And I repeat, don't freak out.

Words to brew by.
Huntsville AL