Author Topic: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...  (Read 2369 times)

Offline hokerer

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2010, 07:14:09 AM »
Also do a Google search on "Son of fermentation chiller".  I use a modification of that design for my fermentation temp control.
Joe

Offline majorvices

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2010, 07:42:37 AM »
What would a cooler setup with a Ranco or Johnson run me?  Sounds like $200+ and is it pretty technical to get together?  Is there a well known web site that sells these things or does home depot have them?

Look at Northern Brewer, MoreBeer or Rebelbrewer .com (or you LHBS) - you can get an analog controller for ~50 bucks. It's not technical at all, plug the controller into the wall, plug fridge or chest freezer into controller and put probe in fridge/freezer. Your done! The nice thing is it takes the work out of fermentation, where as you need to monitor a swamp cooler.
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Offline troy@uk

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2010, 10:45:28 PM »
Back to the yeast.  How about San Francisco Lager WLP 810.  What with a lager recipe and ale temps. it only seems natural.
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Offline cowardm

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2010, 07:26:37 PM »
Thanks to all for replies.  Just wanted to let you know where I stand now.

I do have a refrigerator that I loaned to a friend.  It's one of those glass gas-station types.  The problem is, it may not be big enough and I'm waiting for him to measure it out and let me know if it will fit.

Of course, if it does fit that does still poses a couple of problems
1) Though it's a 6.5 gallon carboy I've had to do a blow off hose the first couple days for my last 2 batches.  I'm pretty sure this fridge doesn't have room for that.
2) It's all glass, so I'll have to work hard to keep light out.

If the refrigerator isn't big enough, I'll definitely opt for the swamp cooler method.

One great idea I'm probably going to invest in in the future is a wine cooler than can do red and white temps.

I canned the honey ginger lager idea.  My wife and I tried various beers that seemed close to it and we just didn't like them.  We can't seem to like pilsners or wheat beers or anything like them.  What can I say? We are hopheads.  So far I've done an amber ale (which turned out really well), an IPA that was right up our alley, and an Imperial Stout which is promising.    I went ahead and put together a pale ale that I think will promise a nice summery and balanced hop-malt flavors.

Thanks for all your help.  I hope to learn enough in the next while to be able to contribute to this forum.  Thanks.

Also, picked up How to Brew on someone's recommendation.  What a life-saver!  Answered most of my questions.
Michael

Offline uthristy

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2010, 08:26:26 AM »
Here's the thing about honey: it doesn't leave much character in the beer. Mostly it is just an expensive way of adding sugar. The exception to the rule is if you a) use a good, raw, local honey (never use the grocery store stuff) and b) add it AFTER fermentation. The very delicate honey characteritics will simply get blown out druing the boil or during the fermentation.


cough,cough ???  I have to disagree with that blanket statement

I make a honey wheat (panty dropper) that can be a tad over-powering with honey aroma/taste.

Honey of choice >
http://www.leightonshoney.com/

Offline a10t2

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2010, 08:32:32 AM »
Aren't you doing both (a) and (b), uthristy?
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2010, 08:43:06 AM »
Aren't you doing both (a) and (b), uthristy?

Doesn't sound like (b) so much.  He says he adds the honey after flameout.  That's well before (b)'s "after fermentation".  Wisdom being that the honey character gets blown off during the vigorous part of fermentation but evidently, uthirsty isn't seeing that.
Joe

Offline uthristy

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2010, 12:31:02 PM »
I used to add .25lb before the boil `2007`

But now @ 5 mins after flameout.

I don't find the honey being scrubbed out during fermentation and in fact have backed down the amount of honey.


Offline majorvices

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2010, 06:09:29 PM »
Here's the thing about honey: it doesn't leave much character in the beer. Mostly it is just an expensive way of adding sugar. The exception to the rule is if you a) use a good, raw, local honey (never use the grocery store stuff) and b) add it AFTER fermentation. The very delicate honey characteritics will simply get blown out druing the boil or during the fermentation.


cough,cough ???  I have to disagree with that blanket statement

I make a honey wheat (panty dropper) that can be a tad over-powering with honey aroma/taste.

Honey of choice >
http://www.leightonshoney.com/

Uhhm - I wouldn't call it a "blanket statement". Its my experience and it is corroborated by many others. If you disagree, that's fine. I certainly respect your opinion and your experience. The "cough, cough" question mark BS is unnecessary. You can disagree politely and informatively without the drama.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2010, 06:17:45 PM by majorvices »
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Offline uthristy

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2010, 08:09:42 AM »
Here's the thing about honey: it doesn't leave much character in the beer. Mostly it is just an expensive way of adding sugar. The exception to the rule is if you a) use a good, raw, local honey (never use the grocery store stuff) and b) add it AFTER fermentation. The very delicate honey characteritics will simply get blown out druing the boil or during the fermentation.


cough,cough ???  I have to disagree with that blanket statement

I make a honey wheat (panty dropper) that can be a tad over-powering with honey aroma/taste.

Honey of choice >
http://www.leightonshoney.com/

Uhhm - I wouldn't call it a "blanket statement". Its my experience and it is corroborated by many others. If you disagree, that's fine. I certainly respect your opinion and your experience. The "cough, cough" question mark BS is unnecessary. You can disagree politely and informatively without the drama.


You know I was going to let this slide but after thinking about it and reading your results with the DuPont yeast decided to bring it back.

First I bolded & colored your remarks to show it was a "blanket statement" by you.
Second do you have images turned off? it was a tongue in cheek remark (cough,cough) with a smiley face next to it.
You called  it drama while  I thought it was lighthearted joke, but to each his own.

I seem to get great results with honey via the specific process I posted-- after FLAME-OUT, ferment cool 58F with a clean neutral yeast and listed  the best honey to use --> BTW is  sold most grocery stores. 
This was learned after trail & error. Seems other people also get good results  with that recipe.

You seem to get good results with the DuPont yeast while "my experience and it is corroborated by many others don't have much luck--ie: stuck/stalled,ect.

Why is that? because  thur trail & error have learned what works for (you) with that yeast.

Hell I could just say based on "my experience and it is corroborated by many others" say that yeast doesn't work but I didn't feel the need to chime in on that thread with a "blanket statement".

Good grief :-X


Offline mabrungard

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2010, 10:50:20 AM »
Regarding Honey:

All brewers should visit the BJCP website where there is a new Mead Study Guide that is an incredible resource for any mead maker and anyone using honey in their beer.  One of the authors was Ken Schramm who authored the book "The Compleat Meadmaker".  There is a very good summary of honey characteristics in the study guide.

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Offline denny

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2010, 10:57:30 AM »
Hi, Martin.  Nice to see you here.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2010, 02:37:55 PM »

You know I was going to let this slide but after thinking about it and reading your results with the DuPont yeast decided to bring it back.

.....
Good grief :-X



I might could agree that I was a little "touchy" ... but don't deny you weren't being drmatic.  ;) I guess I just don;t like being coughed at.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2010, 02:41:17 PM by majorvices »
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Three questions about yeasts and honey and stuff...
« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2010, 06:13:22 PM »
Fermentation control is one of the most critical and sensitive parts of the beer making process. The quality and consistency of the end product rely on it.

I find that fermenting most of my ales in the 60-65F range yields pretty consistent results, whereas I like to ferment my lagers in the 48-50F range. However there are some ales (Saison, Steam beer, etc) as reported by Michael Jackson which are fermented warmer with good results especially Farmhouse ales. Bigger and bolder flavors are achieved by increased ferm temps, but be careful with those temps...bigger and bolder flavors aren't necessarily better.

I have found that cooler fermentations yield smoother flavors in most of my beers.
Ron Price