Author Topic: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles  (Read 3440 times)

Offline TMX

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2015, 04:16:33 am »
Great list but not sure agave wheat is a Basic/Classic style lolz
"The ART of brewing Beer, is the ACT of brewing Beer"
https://txbrewing.wordpress.com

Ferm 1: Irish Red Ale
Ferm 2:

On Deck: American Wheat

Keg 1: Un-Common
Keg 2: Switchback Stout

Total Gallons brewed (2015) - 10

Offline ranchovillabrew

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2015, 04:29:07 am »
Agreed.  I was more calling out my "always ready and improving recipes"
- Charles

Offline erockrph

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2015, 05:14:17 am »
Mine are:

1) IPA
2) Maerzen
3) Saison
4) ESB
5) Robust Porter
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Joe T

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2015, 05:39:02 am »
In no special order:
Imperial Stout: master roasty + creamy + BIG and you've got something truly special. 4
German pilsner: does anyone not love a good German pilsner?
American IPA: a well made IPA just plain rocks.
American pale ale: because it's the German pilsner of american beer.
Barley wine/ordinary bitter parti gyle: it's the gift that keeps on giving!

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2015, 04:20:18 pm »
I brew mostly lagers, so I agree with S.Cerivisae on this point, but a Saison in the summer months is pretty hard to beat, also.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline factory

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2015, 04:30:15 pm »
Mine would have to be:

Kolsch (trying to get the diacetyl under control AND make it crisp)
IPA  ('cause HOPS!)
American Brown (I like it year round)
Wit (same here)
Lite American Lager (because I'm close and still haven't hit it out of the park yet)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2015, 04:58:11 pm »
My taps usually rotate between these, so this is a general 5 :

1/ American hoppy - APA, AIPA, American Brown
2/ Pale lager - Bo and German pils, Helles, Dort, CAP
3/ Pale yeast-driven ales -  Saison, Belgian blond , Kolsch
4/ Trappist type beer - Dubbel, Tripel, Quad
5/ Seasonal/One off - Cider, dark lager, stout, fruit beer -  the 'whatever' tap
« Last Edit: January 24, 2015, 08:13:07 pm by HoosierBrew »
Jon H.

Offline TMX

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #22 on: January 23, 2015, 06:06:26 pm »
I think this is the final list for me, but please continue to discuss and offer up suggestions.
I brew American style ales for the most part, and this list reflects that.

Next step will be to post up the recipes for each, stay tuned.

1. Irish Red Ale – First beer I ever brewed, time to get it nailed down
2. Stout/Porter – I think everyone should know and understand the DarkSide
3. IPA- because IPA!
4. Fizzy Yellow Ale – for the masses/ this will be pitched with a cal common yeast
5: American Wheat - because

prelim for #4

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: #4
Author: TxAleWorks

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: Blonde Ale
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 12 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 13.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.037
Efficiency: 70% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.041
Final Gravity: 1.012
ABV (standard): 3.91%
IBU (tinseth): 23
SRM (morey): 4.95

FERMENTABLES:
15 lb - American - Vienna (75%)
5 lb - American - Pilsner (25%)

HOPS:
1 oz - Magnum, Type: Pellet, AA: 14.2, Use: First Wort, IBU: 15.33
1 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 7.1, Use: Boil for 20 min, IBU: 7.67

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Temp: 150 F, Time: 75 min
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.75 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
1 each - whirlfloc, Time: 15 min, Type: Fining, Use: Boil

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - American Ale Yeast US-05
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 72%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Temp: 59 - 75 F
Fermentation Temp: 62 F

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Local CoSprings Water
Ca2: 66
Mg2: 15
Na: 46
Cl: 24
SO4: 45
HCO3: 192
Water Notes:
"The ART of brewing Beer, is the ACT of brewing Beer"
https://txbrewing.wordpress.com

Ferm 1: Irish Red Ale
Ferm 2:

On Deck: American Wheat

Keg 1: Un-Common
Keg 2: Switchback Stout

Total Gallons brewed (2015) - 10

Offline TMX

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2015, 02:02:12 am »
I think this is the final list for me, but please continue to discuss and offer up suggestions.
I brew American style ales for the most part, and this list reflects that.

Next step will be to post up the recipes for each, stay tuned.

1. Irish Red Ale – First beer I ever brewed, time to get it nailed down
2. Stout/Porter – I think everyone should know and understand the DarkSide
3. IPA- because IPA!
4. Fizzy Yellow Ale – for the masses/ this will be pitched with a cal common yeast
5: American Wheat - because

#1

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: #1
Author: Texas AleWorks

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: Irish Red Ale
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 11.5 gallons (ending kettle volume)
Boil Size: 13.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.043
Efficiency: 70% (ending kettle)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.050
Final Gravity: 1.014
ABV (standard): 4.74%
IBU (tinseth): 26.39
SRM (morey): 16.89

FERMENTABLES:
15 lb - United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (67.3%)
5 lb - United Kingdom - Munich (22.4%)
1 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 40L (4.5%)
1 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 120L (4.5%)
4.5 oz - American - Black Barley (1.3%)

HOPS:
3 oz - East Kent Goldings, Type: Pellet, AA: 5, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 26.39

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Temperature, Temp: 152 F
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.75 qt/lb

YEAST:
White Labs - Irish Ale Yeast WLP004
Starter: Yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 71.5%
Flocculation: Med-High
Optimum Temp: 65 - 68 F
Fermentation Temp: 67 F
Pitch Rate: 1.25 (M cells / ml / deg P)

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Local CoSprings Water
Ca2: 66
Mg2: 15
Na: 46
Cl: 24
SO4: 45
HCO3: 192
Water Notes:
"The ART of brewing Beer, is the ACT of brewing Beer"
https://txbrewing.wordpress.com

Ferm 1: Irish Red Ale
Ferm 2:

On Deck: American Wheat

Keg 1: Un-Common
Keg 2: Switchback Stout

Total Gallons brewed (2015) - 10

Offline TMX

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2015, 04:00:40 pm »
I think this is the final list for me, but please continue to discuss and offer up suggestions.
I brew American style ales for the most part, and this list reflects that.

Next step will be to post up the recipes for each, stay tuned.

1. Irish Red Ale – First beer I ever brewed, time to get it nailed down
2. Stout/Porter – I think everyone should know and understand the DarkSide
3. IPA- because IPA!
4. Fizzy Yellow Ale – for the masses/ this will be pitched with a cal common yeast
5: American Wheat - because

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: #5
Author: Texas AleWorks

Brew Method: All Grain
Style Name: American Wheat or Rye Beer
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 11.5 gallons (ending kettle volume)
Boil Size: 13.5 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.039
Efficiency: 70% (ending kettle)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.045
Final Gravity: 1.011
ABV (standard): 4.55%
IBU (tinseth): 24.78
SRM (morey): 5.62

FERMENTABLES:
10 lb - American - Red Wheat (50%)
8 lb - American - Pale 2-Row (40%)
2 lb - Belgian - CaraVienne (10%)

HOPS:
0.5 oz - Amarillo, Type: Pellet, AA: 9, Use: First Wort, IBU: 4.99
0.5 oz - Amarillo, Type: Pellet, AA: 9, Use: Boil for 50 min, IBU: 7.84
2 oz - Amarillo, Type: Pellet, AA: 9, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 11.95

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Infusion, Temp: 154 F, Time: 75 min
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.75 qt/lb

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
1 each - whirlfloc, Time: 15 min, Type: Fining, Use: Boil

YEAST:
White Labs - California Ale Yeast WLP001
Starter: Yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 76.5%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Temp: 68 - 73 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.5 (M cells / ml / deg P)

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Local CoSprings Water
Ca2: 66
Mg2: 15
Na: 46
Cl: 24
SO4: 45
HCO3: 192
Water Notes:
"The ART of brewing Beer, is the ACT of brewing Beer"
https://txbrewing.wordpress.com

Ferm 1: Irish Red Ale
Ferm 2:

On Deck: American Wheat

Keg 1: Un-Common
Keg 2: Switchback Stout

Total Gallons brewed (2015) - 10

Offline majorvices

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2015, 04:50:47 pm »
You say "Fizzy Yellow Ale" but if you master the art of brewing a good Kölsch you and the masses will be appreciative. I'm going to get back into brewing it again this year because my wife and I both really enjoy it, especially in summer time. It can be a very delicate and delicious beer and in spite of the more traditional Kölsch you may find in Germany you can really play around with and "Americanize" the style with hints of American and Noble hops. This can be a great crossover beer that will appeal to beer snobs as well as beer noobs.

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2015, 05:12:46 pm »
my 5 are:

1. German Pils or Helles
2. Pale Ale / Amber Ale
3. Dort, Oktoberfest
4. Porter or Stout
5. Cider or Apple Ale
Bottled: Always have hefeweizen or dunkelweizen
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
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Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2015, 05:47:22 pm »
I wouldn't say much of my brewing falls into classic styles in their normal form. I brew a lot of saisons and sours, which are historical but not necessarily considered among the classics, and when I do brew more traditional styles I usually put some type of spin on it that makes it abnormal. There's certainly nothing wrong with the classics in their native form. I can go to the store and find several great porters but I have a harder time finding rye porters, which I enjoy, so I am more likely to brew a rye porter to fill my desire for that particular type of porter.
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Offline riceral

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #28 on: January 24, 2015, 07:58:48 pm »
The five styles I would like to brew well and consistently would be:
       1. Porter
       2. Belgian strong ales
       3. Dark lager
       4. English brown ales
       5. Scottish ales

Ralph R.

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Brewing the Basic/Classic styles
« Reply #29 on: January 24, 2015, 11:37:16 pm »
You say "Fizzy Yellow Ale" but if you master the art of brewing a good Kölsch you and the masses will be appreciative. I'm going to get back into brewing it again this year because my wife and I both really enjoy it, especially in summer time. It can be a very delicate and delicious beer and in spite of the more traditional Kölsch you may find in Germany you can really play around with and "Americanize" the style with hints of American and Noble hops. This can be a great crossover beer that will appeal to beer snobs as well as beer noobs.

+1

This is very true. I have converted many BMC drinkers to homebrew/craftbrew drinkers with my Kolsch. It is a beer for everybody.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'