Author Topic: Faster Finished Beer  (Read 1779 times)

Offline flbrewer

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Faster Finished Beer
« on: January 24, 2015, 04:47:22 PM »
Is anyone getting ready to drink beer in 3 weeks or under out there?

Are particular yeast strains finishing much faster?

Is kegging carbing much faster than bottling?


Offline majorvices

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2015, 04:52:57 PM »
Is anyone getting ready to drink beer in 3 weeks or under out there?

Are particular yeast strains finishing much faster?

Is kegging carbing much faster than bottling?

Heck yes, believe it or not a lot of beers can be finished in 2-3 weeks. IPA, Pale Ales, Stouts, lots of beers. The key is to aerate well, pitch enough yeast on the cool side, let the beer stay on the cool side for about 72 hours then start warming the temp.

At Yellowhammer one of our flagship beers is a Belgian Wheat beer and I can turn it around in 10 days!

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2015, 04:53:10 PM »
Is anyone getting ready to drink beer in 3 weeks or under out there?

Are particular yeast strains finishing much faster?

Is kegging carbing much faster than bottling?

yes beers in 3 weeks possible. most my ales finish up within 7 days, set for another 7 days to clean up and let some yeast floc, and then racked to keg for fining and carb. EDIT: forgot to mention as Keith did, for me at the end of the 12-14 days in cold crashing before kegging and fining.

sure some yeast work faster or slower than others, however its not only factor. depends on your OG also, proper pitch, etc.

keg carb is faster the bottle. keg forced carb in 24 hours. set at 10-12 psi....about a week or so.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2015, 05:00:57 PM by wort-h.o.g. »
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2015, 04:55:45 PM »
Yes, bottle conditioning may be hard to do. But a couple other tips is cold crashing and fining (I really like Biofine). Yeast nutrient also speeds up a fermentation.

Offline brewday

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2015, 04:57:30 PM »
I brewed an amber with WY 1968 last weekend and it's going in the keg tomorrow.  I'll be drinking it by Wednesday.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2015, 05:02:17 PM »
I've had quite a few beers pouring from the keg in 2 weeks. As said, pitching plenty of healthy yeast and cool temps are key.
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Offline denny

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2015, 05:11:43 PM »
Is anyone getting ready to drink beer in 3 weeks or under out there?

Are particular yeast strains finishing much faster?

Is kegging carbing much faster than bottling?

Sure.  It depends on the beer recipe, the yeast and fermentation temp, but I've had low gravity beers ready to drink in 5-10 days.  Carbing in a keg will get you carbonated beer in a day or 2.  Carbig in a PET bottle with a carb cap will get it done in less than an hour.
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Offline flbrewer

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2015, 05:42:38 PM »
Is anyone getting ready to drink beer in 3 weeks or under out there?

Are particular yeast strains finishing much faster?

Is kegging carbing much faster than bottling?

Sure.  It depends on the beer recipe, the yeast and fermentation temp, but I've had low gravity beers ready to drink in 5-10 days.  Carbing in a keg will get you carbonated beer in a day or 2.  Carbig in a PET bottle with a carb cap will get it done in less than an hour.

OK, now you are making me want to order those refrigerator plastic keg setup things again.

Offline denny

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2015, 05:47:09 PM »
OK, now you are making me want to order those refrigerator plastic keg setup things again.

Not sure exactly what product you're talking about, but make sure it can be force carbed.  Some of those things need priming, which is no faster than priming bottles.
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Offline bboy9000

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2015, 06:01:08 PM »
I've had a Boulevard Wheat clone ready to pour from the keg on day 10.  I force carb at 40psi for 20-24 hours as long as the beer is warm when it goes into the keg.  It will carb faster than that if the beer is already cold.
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Offline brewday

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2015, 06:12:41 PM »
I've had a Boulevard Wheat clone ready to pour from the keg on day 10.  I force carb at 40psi for 20-24 hours as long as the beer is warm when it goes into the keg.  It will carb faster than that if the beer is already cold.

I thought the opposite was true - my beer goes in the keg cold at 32° and I set it at 30 psi overnight.  It's usually fully carbed in ~18 hrs.

You're saying warm is faster?
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2015, 06:15:53 PM »
I once brewed a dunkelweizen and had it drinking from bottles in seven days. Three in the fermentor, four in the bottle. It got a little smoother by the next week but the fresh wheat taste was fantastic.

Most yeast strains will deliver beer ready for carbonation in two weeks or less, particularly if you have good fermentation processes and you ramp temperatures as primary fermentation starts to wind down. Bigger beers often need more time, as well as lagers. Various strains can need more or less time based upon how you use them. For example, I ferment my saisons at very warm temperatures and those beer benefit from some additional aging, particularly at cooler temperatures, to mellow the harsher yeast character present in younger beer (a process I adopted from commercial saison brewers who also ferment hot) but those same strains fermented cooler can be ready to drink quicker.

The idea that you need weeks and weeks before you can drink a beer comes partially out of the old 1-2-3 schedule advocated in Joy of Homebrewing and other older homebrewing texts and partially out of the nonsense concocted on certain homebrewing forums in the previous decade that has taught new brewers that you don't need to worry about fermentation techniques because it's unthinkable to brew beer that doesn't need a month or more in the fermentor and another two months to bottle condition.
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Offline bboy9000

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2015, 06:27:45 PM »

I've had a Boulevard Wheat clone ready to pour from the keg on day 10.  I force carb at 40psi for 20-24 hours as long as the beer is warm when it goes into the keg.  It will carb faster than that if the beer is already cold.
You're saying warm is faster?

No colder beer carbs faster.  Unfortunately I found out from experience even though I knew better.
Brian
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Offline brewday

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2015, 06:34:06 PM »

I've had a Boulevard Wheat clone ready to pour from the keg on day 10.  I force carb at 40psi for 20-24 hours as long as the beer is warm when it goes into the keg.  It will carb faster than that if the beer is already cold.
You're saying warm is faster?

No colder beer carbs faster.  Unfortunately I found out from experience even though I knew better.

Gotcha - agreed.  Sorry, misread your post.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Faster Finished Beer
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2015, 06:41:31 PM »
Well, sort of. Yes, colder beer will absorb CO2 quicker. But that is just the first part of carbonation. The second part is the hydration of the dissolved CO2. Since it is a chemical process, I am pretty sure that it will proceed quicker when the beer is warmer.

I think that most of us recognize fresh carbonation. The bubbles are big and coarse, just like at the soda fountain. It takes time for the carbonation, that we can easily inject into the beer, to hydrate and produce those nice fine bubbles that we prefer in our glasses.

So it seems to be a balance between time and temperature for carbonation. In my experience, it still takes about 2 weeks to get the fine bubbles in beer. But you can still enjoy that beer with coarse bubbles in the interim.
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