Author Topic: With German pils, must have food to pair  (Read 1251 times)

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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With German pils, must have food to pair
« on: March 01, 2015, 07:11:44 PM »
Whipped up some spatzle, sauerbraten, and baked potato to go with the German pils.

Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2015, 07:24:44 PM »
very nice!
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2015, 08:17:35 PM »
Looks great, the food and the pils !
Jon H.

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2015, 08:20:16 PM »
Looks great, the food and the pils !

thanks..it doesn't suck  ::)
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline pete b

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2015, 09:01:58 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2015, 09:09:06 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

and did you know on many bock's in Germany is a picture of a goat? originated from the early days and where Maibock is said to have originated in the town of Einbeck. like many things, it got lost in translation and people said ein bock (instead of Einbeck) which translates to billy goat....and the rest is history.
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline pete b

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2015, 09:18:45 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

and did you know on many bock's in Germany is a picture of a goat? originated from the early days and where Maibock is said to have originated in the town of Einbeck. like many things, it got lost in translation and people said ein bock (instead of Einbeck) which translates to billy goat....and the rest is history.
I've been appreciating that language lately. I have been working with quite a few German speakers lately. I like that the have words for things like emotions or ideas that in English we need sentences for. Shaedenfreude and stuff like that. I had heard the goat/ bock story. Love that stuff!
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2015, 09:23:25 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

and did you know on many bock's in Germany is a picture of a goat? originated from the early days and where Maibock is said to have originated in the town of Einbeck. like many things, it got lost in translation and people said ein bock (instead of Einbeck) which translates to billy goat....and the rest is history.
I've been appreciating that language lately. I have been working with quite a few German speakers lately. I like that the have words for things like emotions or ideas that in English we need sentences for. Shaedenfreude and stuff like that. I had heard the goat/ bock story. Love that stuff!

Yes great culture and language.

I like to refer to my beer  literally...may goat, double goat, ice goat,  dark goat, Christmas goat.......you get the idea.


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Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2015, 11:24:01 PM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
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Offline pete b

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2015, 12:08:47 AM »
I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
Somehow Nick is a folk name for the devil. " old Nick" etc. The Adam Sandler movie "Little Nicky" used this. So yes, I think your right that its a different idiom, just like English has several different words and stories for the devil. Given that its easy to see pumper= fart.
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2015, 12:11:46 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


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Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2015, 12:18:04 AM »
This is outstanding - part interesting linguistics, part fart history. Win-win.    ;D
Jon H.

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2015, 12:23:49 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


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St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Most references to Old Nick that I can find say it is old English for the devil. How it got to Germany is something I don't know.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2015, 12:34:21 AM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2015, 12:29:00 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


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St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Apparently very old in origin regarding reference to nick or Nicholas and the devil.

Edit: perhaps Saint Nicholas , the one who dispenses gifts is to mean the gift that dispenses from us after eating pumpernickel


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« Last Edit: March 02, 2015, 12:32:06 AM by Wort-H.O.G. »
Ken- Chagrin Falls, OH
CPT, U.S.Army
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Harveys-Brewhaus/405092862905115

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=The_Science_of_Mashing

Serving:        In Process:
Vienna IPA          O'Fest
Dort
Mead                 
Cider                         
Ger'merican Blonde
Amber Ale
Next:
Ger Pils
O'Fest

Offline pete b

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Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2015, 01:06:06 AM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?

I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.

I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Most references to Old Nick that I can find say it is old English for the devil. How it got to Germany is something I don't know.
My girlfriend's birthday is December 6 and every year we try to find this beer: http://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/285/776/
Its only brewed on St. Nick's day and sold the following fal/winter. I believe we have had it twice. It was the world's strongest beer for awhile.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.